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General Pain 12-06-2008 04:11 AM

Subways
 
Subways has not been discussed in this forum. As I see it it is a excellent asset.

FOR PLAYERS:

Bombshelter
transportation
mobile hq
etc etc
u could probably hide a small factory in some of the bigger tunnels

FOR GMs:

the subways could be infested with all kinds of dangerous shit -
sewerpeople,scruffies,cannibals,mutants(if allowed), other armed enemies
angry rat swarms etc etc

subways also has quite a different look/feel after a nuke / conventional war has hit a city.The power is gone....

(sadly, in this picture the light fictures worked)
http://www.jonathanstephens.com/newy...rk-Subways.jpg

http://fdelaitre.club.fr/KWS-Works.jpg

General Pain 12-06-2008 06:15 AM

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/23/31...d7a82db2ee.jpg

chico20854 12-06-2008 07:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by General Pain
Subways has not been discussed in this forum. As I see it it is a excellent asset.

FOR PLAYERS:

Bombshelter
transportation
mobile hq
etc etc
u could probably hide a small factory in some of the bigger tunnels

FOR GMs:

the subways could be infested with all kinds of dangerous shit -
sewerpeople,scruffies,cannibals,mutants(if allowed), other armed enemies
angry rat swarms etc etc

In general, I agree except for one thing: flooding. Almost all modern subways require regular, reliable electrical power to keep them dry. The DC metro system (the second largest in the US, although far behind New York) was shut down a few years ago when power failed during a heavy rain storm. Within a few hours several stations were flooded with over a meter of water on the tracks. After months or years of no electricity (and no regular maintenance of the tunnels) I think the subways would be quite deadly, dark and dangerous underground rivers/lakes.

Nowhere Man 1966 12-06-2008 09:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chico20854
In general, I agree except for one thing: flooding. Almost all modern subways require regular, reliable electrical power to keep them dry. The DC metro system (the second largest in the US, although far behind New York) was shut down a few years ago when power failed during a heavy rain storm. Within a few hours several stations were flooded with over a meter of water on the tracks. After months or years of no electricity (and no regular maintenance of the tunnels) I think the subways would be quite deadly, dark and dangerous underground rivers/lakes.

I wonder if most subways are like that. I assume Pittsburgh's joke of a subway needs to have pumps running as well, we have three rivers here plus a fourth underground one.

I've also heard that in an emergency, if you can open a manhole cover and go down, that could provide a quick bomb shelter. Trouble is, many cities are switching to locked manhole covers so that might not be an option, in fact, my millionaire (I'm part of the poor relations) cousin is involved in selling them. :(

Chuck M.

General Pain 12-06-2008 01:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chico20854
In general, I agree except for one thing: flooding. Almost all modern subways require regular, reliable electrical power to keep them dry. The DC metro system (the second largest in the US, although far behind New York) was shut down a few years ago when power failed during a heavy rain storm. Within a few hours several stations were flooded with over a meter of water on the tracks. After months or years of no electricity (and no regular maintenance of the tunnels) I think the subways would be quite deadly, dark and dangerous underground rivers/lakes.

very inspiring...thax for that one...

but I guess it rains alot more in dc/ny than LA ?

weswood 12-06-2008 03:30 PM

Are there subways in LA? I've never heard of any, and burrying a trian in an area known for earthqukes is questionable to me. But never been there, so I maight be wrong.

kcdusk 12-06-2008 05:21 PM

In twilight chronicles a few years ago now, i had a whole series of encounters planned to entice the PCs underground. I dont think we quite got there though.

But yes, in general, i think tunnels would be great for the reasons you mention. And even if there isnt anything you can see, its often the thought of "whats in the dark" that builds the tension.


There was that show on pay tv, and more recently on commercial tv in australia (where i seen it). It was called "Earth after humans" or something.

In it, they said the NYC subway system has 4 million gallons (!) of water pumped out of it each day.

I guess most subway systems, being underground, are "below the water line".


.

kato13 12-06-2008 05:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kcdusk
In it, they said the NYC subway system has 4 million gallons (!) of water pumped out of it each day.
.

The math nut in me had to do this, and I figured I would share.

Ok the New York Subway system has 443 miles of Track tunnels and about 300 miles of supporting tunnels. Assuming a diamter of 16 feet for the track tunnels and 7 feet for the supporting tunnels. Gives about 60,959,463 cubic feet. I am going to round up to 65 million including stations. A gallon is .133 cubic feet. So the system would have filled in approximately 122 days.

I would guess you could calculate other cities by comparing annual rainfall, but my guess is that most would be flooded by the time T2k rolls around.

kcdusk 12-06-2008 06:50 PM

I'm not arguing with your math kato. But i got the feeling from the show that the subway would fill with water within 7 days.

I quoted 4 million gallons below, but part of me is now thinking hte number was 13 million. It just sounds like so much water.

Even if after a few days there was a few inches of water, or ankle to knee high, it would make travel underground wet and discomforting. And once its at waist high, with water rats swimming around ... it'd be "shivver".

kato13 12-06-2008 06:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kcdusk
I'm not arguing with your math kato. But i got the feeling from the show that the subway would fill with water within 7 days.

I quoted 4 million gallons below, but part of me is now thinking hte number was 13 million. It just sounds like so much water.

The volume of the tunnels is also massive. I remember reading that the mass of everything put on Manhattan Island. The steel, concrete, asphalt, people, wood, cars, buses, trucks, and everything else does not equal the weight of the granite removed to make the tunnels. And if the number is 13 million gallons then number becomes 37 days. New York could easily get the average rain of 37 days in only 7 days.

kato13 12-06-2008 07:00 PM

Found this

http://www.nysun.com/new-york/inside...looding/35672/

13 million on a dry day. So you could pretty much guarantee that it would be filled in a under a month (perhaps much under) if there was any appreciable rainfall.

General Pain 12-07-2008 12:50 AM

well...
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by kcdusk
I'm not arguing with your math kato. But i got the feeling from the show that the subway would fill with water within 7 days.

I quoted 4 million gallons below, but part of me is now thinking hte number was 13 million. It just sounds like so much water.

Even if after a few days there was a few inches of water, or ankle to knee high, it would make travel underground wet and discomforting. And once its at waist high, with water rats swimming around ... it'd be "shivver".

Think about the alternative...above ground (after about 8 nukes over 15 years) LA is populated by

-radioactive dustclouds
-various human mauraders,former militarycanibals,gangs,etc etc
-fire(s)
-oops forgot to say any people is probably armed with automatic rifles or the like...I could go on,...

I got the inspiration to this thread after looking at Los Angeles in Google Earth...

My plan was to get an escape route out of LA downtown...

kcdusk 12-07-2008 01:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by General Pain
Think about the alternative...above ground (after about 8 nukes over 15 years) LA is populated by

-radioactive dustclouds
-various human mauraders,former militarycanibals,gangs,etc etc
-fire(s)
-oops forgot to say any people is probably armed with automatic rifles or the like...I could go on,...

I got the inspiration to this thread after looking at Los Angeles in Google Earth...

My plan was to get an escape route out of LA downtown...



Well ... yeah ... but at least your dry :-)

WallShadow 02-17-2014 09:23 AM

lost/hidden underground structures
 
http://www.theverge.com/2014/2/5/528...-avenue-subway -- Atlantic Avenue abandoned subway tunnel in Brooklyn. 2570-ft long.

http://www.nycgo.com/slideshows/new-york-secrets/11/ Brooklyn Bridge (Manhattan side) Bomb shelter and hidden chambers--restocked by the folks who brought you the Strategic Reserve stockpile(s) of Allegheny Uprising?:cool:

http://www.nycgo.com/slideshows/new-york-secrets/2/ -- "Lost Station" subway stop under NYC City Hall, something one of the Duke's opponents might pay well to learn of.

http://gizmodo.com/how-one-inventor-...nde-1123695775 Mr. Beach's Pneumatic Subway, on Manhattan Island.

StainlessSteelCynic 02-17-2014 06:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by weswood (Post 2917)
Are there subways in LA? I've never heard of any, and burrying a trian in an area known for earthqukes is questionable to me. But never been there, so I maight be wrong.

I was well aware of LA's massive storm water drains and runoffs, they've featured in many, many movies but I didn't know about any subway systems. But yes, Los Angeles does have subways (something I didn't know until your question kicked my curiosity into gear!). Specifically it has two working lines and one abandoned line.
The working lines are the Red Line (16.4 mi / 26.4 km) opened in 1993 and the Purple Line (6.4 mi / 10.3 km) opened in 2006. The Purple Line runs most of its length on the Red Line although I am unsure if it has a physically separate track and platform system (seems unlikely). Extensions are planned for the subway system but funding appears to be a big problem.
The abandoned line was operating in the mid-1920s and had a short life, it ceased operations in 1955.

General info about the transit system including the subways
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metro_R...Angeles_County)
http://www.la-electric-travel.com/Lo...etro-Rail.html
Map of the passenger rail system (subways are red and purple)
http://subway.umka.org/map-los-angeles.html
Article from 2010 about subway expansion
http://secondavenuesagas.com/2010/11...-system-grows/
Article from 2012 about subway expansion
http://www.thetransportpolitic.com/2...-25-years-off/
And finally, (the most interesting one!), the abandoned system
http://www.awalkerinla.com/2012/05/1...iginal-subway/
http://www.uncanny.net/~wetzel/subwayarea.htm
http://laist.com/2008/07/12/laistory_the_19.php

Cdnwolf 02-18-2014 05:28 AM

Quote:

SUBWAYS
I hate closed-in places. I always have, but I hate them more
now. That trip down those endless, cold stone steps into
darkness must have been the longest walk I ever took in my
life. Turk had the torch and he was behind us, the light casting
weird and shifting shadows which rushed across wet stone
walls or vanished into pitch blackness, shifting and changing
with each step down. At the bottom there was water-bitter
cold and black as ink. The air stank, and the darkness pressed
around us like a blanket. I'd heard New York's subways were
bad, but this ...
Then Turk screamed and the torch went out, and right then
all of us about jumped out of our skins. There were shapes out
there in the dark, half seen by the faint light that was filtering
down from the top of the steps, and those shapes had grabbed
Turk. I could hear them.. .making low, wet, throaty gobbling
noises in the dark.
My rifle was bucking in m y hand before the echoes of Turk's
screams stopped. The muzzle flash lit up the targets like a strobe
at some horrible light-show. Dements, three ... five ... ten of them,
standing over Turk's ragdoll form, some of them pitching back
into the dark as rounds chopped into them at close range, but
the others were looking at me, their eyes very strange in the
strobe-flashing of m y rifle.
My magazine emptied and I sent it clattering to the floor. Backing
away, I pulled another from m y belt pouch.. . even in the dark,
I could sense them moving towards me...
Page 36 of Going Home deals with the New York subway system.

Gelrir 02-18-2014 05:13 PM

The old subway tunnels in Los Angeles appeared in a lot of movies in the 1980s and early 1990s. The "V" miniseries, for example, features the Toluca substation and the Belmont tunnel entrance a lot.

http://www.amymckenzie.net/web_galle...istoric25.html

--
Michael B.

WallShadow 02-18-2014 07:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by StainlessSteelCynic (Post 58052)
I was well aware of LA's massive storm water drains and runoffs, they've featured in many, many movies but I didn't know about any subway systems.

LA's storm drains? Think of the potential for rumors! D'ya think they'd find any giant mutated ants down there?:rolleyes:

mikeo80 02-18-2014 10:35 PM

I know that Philadelphia has a subway system. IIRC, basically a north/south run on Broad Street and an east/west line on Market Street. Again, IIRC, Market Street line is both underground and above ground.

http://subway.umka.org/map-philadelphia.html

I do not remember any mention of flooding on the North/South line. I used to use it to get to Temple University. While I went to Temple, the subways were a relatively safe and effective way to travel. The two years I went to Temple, I never had any problems.

With T2k both V1 and V2.2, Philly gets nuked pretty hard because of massive oil refineries in South Philly. I could see maybe the north end of the subway down to say City Hall MIGHT still exist....Could be a lead in for scavenging the Temple Library as an example of a scenario..

My $0.02

Mike

stormlion1 02-18-2014 11:13 PM

The Philadelphia Tunnels won't flood, there a good distance from the Delaware River but the Schuylkill is another story up by 30th Street Station where the tunnels and the River are only a few thousand feet from each other. Course there both above ground but let the river overflow its banks and they will begin to flood quick.
Also don't forget that there is one or two abandoned Stops in the Philly Subway System, one quite large and connecting old Steam Passages throughout some leading quite a distance from Central Philly. I used to ride a bike through them. Tight but doable and completely hidden from most Philadelphians and leading into the sub basements of a lot of older buildings or just dead ending where new construction has obliterated those passage. Don't recommend going down there, easy to get lost and the Bums are scrappers about there territory!

http://hiddencityphila.org/2013/01/t...n-underground/

StainlessSteelCynic 02-19-2014 03:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by WallShadow (Post 58078)
LA's storm drains? Think of the potential for rumors! D'ya think they'd find any giant mutated ants down there?:rolleyes:

Funny you should say that...
I have a varied collection of interests including underground & urban exploration and although I also enjoy many of the 1950s-60s "atomic horror" movies, I specifically wanted to see "Them!" because part of the movie takes place in those LA storm drains.

.45cultist 03-05-2014 10:04 AM

During my 1st ed. T2K, I'd look at men's adventure fiction for ideas, one about NYC stated there were 6900 miles of tunnels, subway and various utilities added together. But a subway tunnel in various stages of flooding and with brigands and critters would be a good spot for a forgotten CD stockpiles. Dungeon 21! This site has all the gear needed for a salvage job.

kalos72 03-05-2014 10:41 AM

Link please? :)

.45cultist 03-06-2014 05:01 AM

It was a dead tree series that inspired the 1990's militia movements, hence my interest for the game. Classic b rate stuff, but the tunnel part was real, "6900 miles, most big enough for a man to move through." They found a group of disfigured cannibals lived there..... I believe it may have been the "Ashes" series. The feds started showing displeasure at the author's influence and he started taking it personal. Be warned the series is rambling and disjointed. Also classic pulp weapons handling and effects.

kalos72 03-06-2014 07:17 AM

Not sure I follow...is it a book series named Dungeon 21?

Cdnwolf 03-06-2014 07:25 AM

1 Attachment(s)
I grab inspiration from Metro 2033...

kalos72 03-06-2014 08:04 AM

Side note: Metro any good?

Targan 03-06-2014 07:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kalos72 (Post 58452)
Side note: Metro any good?

Absolutely. Both of them. Would've preferred them to be a bit more "open world" though.

.45cultist 03-06-2014 08:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kalos72 (Post 58448)
Not sure I follow...is it a book series named Dungeon 21?

No, that was my reference to finding the extensive Civil Defense caches dismantled in the Clinton era, these had WWII small arms so particular attention was paid to destruction. The book series was the Ashes series, "Out of the Ashes was the first. Again these are shlock, not alternate history. But inspiration comes from the most surprising things at times.;)

.45cultist 03-06-2014 08:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Targan (Post 58464)
Absolutely. Both of them. Would've preferred them to be a bit more "open world" though.

I second this statement!:D


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