RPG Forums

Go Back   RPG Forums > Role Playing Game Section > Twilight 2000 Forum

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 01-30-2009, 01:28 AM
General Pain's Avatar
General Pain General Pain is offline
...not exactly open casket material
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Tiger City
Posts: 1,953
Send a message via MSN to General Pain
Talking T2K Cuisine - Food in the aftermath

What would people eat? I guess it's all up to GM on how heavy the apoc. has been and how long ago it has happened.

I'd guess in the big (formerly big) cities rat-o-van (rat run over by a van) and the like would be possible ....or maybe the PCs will see the following sign?

__________________
The Big Book of War - Twilight 2000 Filedump Site
Guns don't kill people,apes with guns do.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 01-30-2009, 02:37 AM
Targan's Avatar
Targan Targan is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Perth, Western Australia
Posts: 3,435
Default

In the NYC part of my current campaign Rat-On-A-Stick has proved to be a very popular dish with the locals. The funny thing is my group are mostly former Harnmaster players so we are all fully accustomed to that sort of urban snack from our Harnmaster PCs having partaken of it innumerable times.
__________________
"It is better to be feared than loved" - Nicolo Machiavelli
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 01-30-2009, 04:57 AM
General Pain's Avatar
General Pain General Pain is offline
...not exactly open casket material
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Tiger City
Posts: 1,953
Send a message via MSN to General Pain
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Targan
In the NYC part of my current campaign Rat-On-A-Stick has proved to be a very popular dish with the locals. The funny thing is my group are mostly former Harnmaster players so we are all fully accustomed to that sort of urban snack from our Harnmaster PCs having partaken of it innumerable times.
Before we nuked Manila in HQs Campaign we experienced the rat-on-a-stick
__________________
The Big Book of War - Twilight 2000 Filedump Site
Guns don't kill people,apes with guns do.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 01-30-2009, 05:19 AM
headquarters's Avatar
headquarters headquarters is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Norways weather beaten coasts
Posts: 1,825
Default heheh

Quote:
Originally Posted by General Pain
Before we nuked Manila in HQs Campaign we experienced the rat-on-a-stick

..and you will again..

..if you are LUCKY!!
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 01-30-2009, 08:26 AM
General Pain's Avatar
General Pain General Pain is offline
...not exactly open casket material
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Tiger City
Posts: 1,953
Send a message via MSN to General Pain
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by headquarters
..and you will again..

..if you are LUCKY!!
hmmm...seems we have to go back to canibalism....

and in case I'm right - here is some inspiration

http://www.indiefilm.com/cookbook/en...yclopedia.html
__________________
The Big Book of War - Twilight 2000 Filedump Site
Guns don't kill people,apes with guns do.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 01-30-2009, 10:12 AM
Mohoender's Avatar
Mohoender Mohoender is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Near Cannes, South of France
Posts: 1,653
Default

I advise you to watch this french movie if you can find it: "Delicatessen". It's a nice idea that is perfectly relevant to canibalism in a post-apoc setting (a rare type of movie in France).

Here is the link to the english wiki on it.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delicatessen_(film)

Last edited by Mohoender; 01-30-2009 at 10:21 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 01-30-2009, 03:06 PM
kato13's Avatar
kato13 kato13 is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Chicago, Il USA
Posts: 3,250
Send a message via ICQ to kato13
Default

In response to the question, the simplest answer is "whatever they could get their hands on".

In areas with European agricultural influence (Americas, Europe, Some of Africa) i would expect the staples to be grain based gruel, bread and beer. Asia would, as always, focus on rice. Each would be supplemented with what ever vegetable and meat protein they could find locally, including insects and rats.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 01-30-2009, 04:42 PM
jester jester is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Equaly at home in the water, the mountains and the desert.
Posts: 919
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mohoender
I advise you to watch this french movie if you can find it: "Delicatessen". It's a nice idea that is perfectly relevant to canibalism in a post-apoc setting (a rare type of movie in France).

Here is the link to the english wiki on it.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delicatessen_(film)

I saw that a couple years ago. Interesting but it didn't really grab me. And everyone was just too weird. I think its on par with preformance art or Circ Du Oile or Circe De Sol or one of those similiar just to out there.

Although the irony was good, the butchers daughter liked the handyman and was also trying to save him.
__________________
"God bless America, the land of the free, but only so long as it remains the home of the brave."
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 01-30-2009, 08:40 PM
Mohoender's Avatar
Mohoender Mohoender is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Near Cannes, South of France
Posts: 1,653
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jester
I saw that a couple years ago. Interesting but it didn't really grab me. And everyone was just too weird. I think its on par with preformance art or Circ Du Oile or Circe De Sol or one of those similiar just to out there.

Although the irony was good, the butchers daughter liked the handyman and was also trying to save him.
I had not thought of it that way but I understand what you mean and that is quite true.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 01-31-2009, 09:58 AM
pmulcahy11b's Avatar
pmulcahy11b pmulcahy11b is offline
The Stat Guy
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: San Antonio, TX
Posts: 3,722
Default

Imagine -- a roach coach where they actually serve roaches...
__________________
All that stuff we know -- what if we're wrong? --Science Channel

Entirely too much T2K stuff here: www.pmulcahy.com
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 01-31-2009, 10:32 AM
Targan's Avatar
Targan Targan is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Perth, Western Australia
Posts: 3,435
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by pmulcahy11b
Imagine -- a roach coach where they actually serve roaches...
And when you call someone a "goat smoker" its because they really do smoke goats...
__________________
"It is better to be feared than loved" - Nicolo Machiavelli
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 01-31-2009, 02:24 PM
Raellus's Avatar
Raellus Raellus is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Marana, AZ
Posts: 2,394
Default

Horses and dogs would go pretty fast, where food is really scarce. Rats too; Pigeons in urban areas.

In terms of more organized agriculture/animal husbandry, seems like goats would become popular again, being as they are relatively hardy and will eat just about anything.

And then, there's always Soilent Green...
__________________
Dulce bellum inexpertis. - Erasmus
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 01-31-2009, 03:40 PM
Littlearmies Littlearmies is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 108
Default

Funnily enough we have a veggie who works in our office and at our office party I asked if the reason she was a vegetarian was moral or because she didn't like eating cute furry animals or she just didn't like meat. She replied that she didn't think it was moral to kill something else just so she could eat. So I said if an animal just died of old age would she be okay with eating it then - she thought about and said she couldn't see why not.

So I bought her this for her birthday a couple of weeks ago:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Original-Roa.../dp/0898152003

It's actually pretty practical!

Malc
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 01-31-2009, 09:19 PM
pmulcahy11b's Avatar
pmulcahy11b pmulcahy11b is offline
The Stat Guy
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: San Antonio, TX
Posts: 3,722
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Littlearmies
Funnily enough we have a veggie who works in our office...She replied that she didn't think it was moral to kill something else just so she could eat.
Does she not know that plants are also alive?
__________________
All that stuff we know -- what if we're wrong? --Science Channel

Entirely too much T2K stuff here: www.pmulcahy.com
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 02-01-2009, 03:07 AM
Rupert Willies's Avatar
Rupert Willies Rupert Willies is offline
Out on bail
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Norway
Posts: 260
Talking mmmm Soylent Green

Quote:
Originally Posted by Raellus
And then, there's always Soilent Green...
Yes, as long as there are people, there will always be Soylent Green. Tastes like chicken!
__________________
If You're In A Fair Fight, You Didn't Plan It Properly.
I don't carry a gun in case I get in a gun fight. I carry a gun because I don't want to miss the opportunity to get in a gun fight.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 02-01-2009, 03:37 AM
Legbreaker's Avatar
Legbreaker Legbreaker is offline
Blood soaked, axe wielding psycho
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Tasmania, Australia
Posts: 4,053
Send a message via Yahoo to Legbreaker
Default

I heard it's more like pork....
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 02-01-2009, 05:20 AM
Targan's Avatar
Targan Targan is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Perth, Western Australia
Posts: 3,435
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Legbreaker
I heard it's more like pork....
That's what the Maoris say.
__________________
"It is better to be feared than loved" - Nicolo Machiavelli
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 02-01-2009, 05:43 AM
Mohoender's Avatar
Mohoender Mohoender is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Near Cannes, South of France
Posts: 1,653
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by pmulcahy11b
Does she not know that plants are also alive?
Yes but you can hardly imagine them screaming unless standing in a forest in a middle of a storm.

Nevertheless, people always have strange reaction concerning meat. I'm eating a lot of kangaroo lately and I will for some weeks. The village minimarket bought three types of meat (frozen) for christmas: Kangaroo, doe and ostrich. People have bought all the does and ostrichs but Kangaroos were left aside. Hopefully for him, I'll be a customer: it's very good.

From what I know, many Americans would avoid Rabbit (It's excellent). Reptiles are fairly good either and according to my cousin white worms are juicy.

Anyway the most funny thing is that many meat eater are showing disgust when you ask them to kill an animal. Visit an aquarium with my wife and you'll quickly understand that many of these wonderful fishes are only want be sushis. Visit a zoo or a farm with me and you quickly realize that these animals are no more than walking steaks. Well done, medium or rare??
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 02-01-2009, 05:46 AM
Mohoender's Avatar
Mohoender Mohoender is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Near Cannes, South of France
Posts: 1,653
Default

In order to get back to the subject. One of my history teacher once told me that during WWII he would have been very happy to eat cat food or dog food. You can add these to the list along with insects of all sorts.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 02-01-2009, 05:55 AM
Targan's Avatar
Targan Targan is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Perth, Western Australia
Posts: 3,435
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Littlearmies
Funnily enough we have a veggie who works in our office and at our office party I asked if the reason she was a vegetarian was moral or because she didn't like eating cute furry animals or she just didn't like meat. She replied that she didn't think it was moral to kill something else just so she could eat.
I'm tempted to say that is madness but that would be intolerant of me. Anyone who uses a mirror to take a look inside their mouth can clearly see that we humans are omnivores. Throwing millions of years of evolution out the window because you think fluffy critters are too cute to eat seems a little odd to me. However I can sort of see where someone is coming from if they decide not to eat meat because they wouldn't be prepared to kill, gut and skin an animal themseves. The meat I eat tends to be from types of animals I have killed and eaten in the past or would be prepared to hunt. I don't eat beef very often because I'm not too keen on the idea of killing, gutting and skinning a cow. That would be a really big job.
__________________
"It is better to be feared than loved" - Nicolo Machiavelli

Last edited by Targan; 02-02-2009 at 08:39 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 02-01-2009, 06:26 AM
pmulcahy11b's Avatar
pmulcahy11b pmulcahy11b is offline
The Stat Guy
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: San Antonio, TX
Posts: 3,722
Default

I'm definitely not a vegetarian, but I'm not a hunter either. It's cowardice more than anything else -- I can't stand to look an animal in the eye (or even the ass) and shoot it, though I've done it in the past (along with some snaring and trapping) and could do it in the future. It's the duality of man; I love animals, yet I eat them too -- I just don't want to hunt them myself.
__________________
All that stuff we know -- what if we're wrong? --Science Channel

Entirely too much T2K stuff here: www.pmulcahy.com
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 02-01-2009, 08:30 AM
jester jester is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Equaly at home in the water, the mountains and the desert.
Posts: 919
Default

What would be eaten in T2K:

I am thinking danelions, millet as both tend to grow wild.

Rose bulbs would be used as a jam or even medicine <high in Vitimin C>

Thistles as portions of those are eaten.

Pine needles are a good source of Vitmin C


As for other items,

Insects, worm farms would be en vogue, A plate of worms served and slurped like one would spagehtti.

Rats, Rabbits and similiar small easily raised animals

Pigeons would also be another common fowl eaten, chickens and other fowl would be to valuable for their eggs and their size.

Fish, aquaculture in areas that can manage this could raise catfish and carp easily, you could turn a swimming pool into such a pond feeding them ground up table scraps.

A plant I have considered is raising two types of animals:

Chickens or Turkeys

And

Catfish or Carp

And maybe rabbits:

Rabits get the grain and grass and such.



Catch the fish, process the meat and preserve it, the cast off and bones get ground and fed to the chickens.

The chickens get processed, and the meat preserved. What is cast off is ground and fed to the fish.

The Rabbits, they just get processed and their cast offs fed to both fish and chickens.

Also, I can see fishing becoming more common much like in the days of old, people going out in rowboats.

In coastal areas I can see people raising muscles <easy really>

and harvesting kelp and seaweed.
__________________
"God bless America, the land of the free, but only so long as it remains the home of the brave."
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 02-01-2009, 12:25 PM
Mohoender's Avatar
Mohoender Mohoender is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Near Cannes, South of France
Posts: 1,653
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jester
What would be eaten in T2K:

... In coastal areas I can see people raising muscles <easy really>

and harvesting kelp and seaweed.
I like several of your ideas Jest but I'll ask for a few clarification and I'll add a few more.

First what do you call Pine Needle? Is that what we call Pignons (a Pine fruit)? Another thing: what is Danelion?

In terms of vegetables I think that you can add several things that are easily grown: Rutabaga, Jerusalem Artichoke and Oats.

You could also add several types of gourds and marrows (including pumpkin and pickles)

I don't know for the Americas but for Europe several wild plants are also eatable: rhubarb, nettle (soup) and... dandelion (I just found what it is ). Of course, you can add several type of berries including blackberries, wild cherries...

For the animals, I think you overlooked one: Guinea Pigs. Goats (milk and cheese) will be around also but someone else already said it.

Frogs of course are also easily raised and more easily captured than fish. I can catch about 10 frog in half an hour while I can spend several days trying to catch a single fish.

And of course, you can plan on snails. Raising them is very easy as you just need a small quite river. You just have to carve several artificial islands with plenty of grass on them. Put the snails on them and wait until the right period. When a snail is stuck on an island, they simply cannot get out.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 02-01-2009, 01:16 PM
Rupert Willies's Avatar
Rupert Willies Rupert Willies is offline
Out on bail
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Norway
Posts: 260
Default

I suspect Danelion = dandelion = pissenlit in French = løvetann in Norwegian http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dandelion
Millet http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Millet



Correct me if I'm wrong.
__________________
If You're In A Fair Fight, You Didn't Plan It Properly.
I don't carry a gun in case I get in a gun fight. I carry a gun because I don't want to miss the opportunity to get in a gun fight.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 02-01-2009, 01:53 PM
Earthpig's Avatar
Earthpig Earthpig is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Menomonie, Wisconsin
Posts: 79
Default

There is a movie called King Rat where pow's raised rats and sold them to other pow's, as small deer that grew in Maylasia. they grow fast and breed....well like rats.

Acorns once the tannin is bleached out are very good and full of fat and nutrients, plus when ground can make a flour. Young ferns (called fiddle head greens) can be very tasty. Water cress as a salad is very good. we have an abundance of wild onions/leeks in the area.....make for a very flatulance producing meal. Notice that during the summer/Fall you can find plenty, winter is another deal.best to save by drying/canning/pickling as much as possible.
__________________
"It's in russian it say's "front towards enem......."
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 02-01-2009, 04:09 PM
Webstral's Avatar
Webstral Webstral is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: North San Francisco Bay
Posts: 1,680
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mohoender
From what I know, many Americans would avoid Rabbit (It's excellent).
I had rabbit once--before I starting speaking Lapine. It was enjoyable. I couldn't do it anymore, though. In the event of the holocaust, I'd have to trade Stewie for his value in meat and pelt to someone else. I wouldn't have the heart to break the neck of and eat the little lop I've devoted so much to.

Totally OT, if anyone is interested in seeing how trainable rabbits can be, I have a couple of videos of mine here:

www.dragoncurls.blogspot.com

Webstral
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 02-01-2009, 04:18 PM
Webstral's Avatar
Webstral Webstral is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: North San Francisco Bay
Posts: 1,680
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Targan
Anyone who uses a mirror to take a look inside their mouth can clearly see that we humans are omnivores.
It's true that we can eat meat. That doesn't mean we should--at least not the way Western nations have come to eat meat. Our digestive tracts have a great deal more in common with the digestive tracts of rabbits (sans the cecum) than with wolves or cats. We don't handle cholesterol very well. Diseases brought on by over-consumption of animal products are the leading causes of death in the US. We can eat meat, but we're optimized for vegetable consumption. For everyone who equates meat consumption with being at the top of the food chain and thence with self-esteem, remember that lions and wolves don't have opposable thumbs.

That much said, no one is going to give a damn about such long-term niceties like cholesterol build-up after the Thanksgiving Day Massacre.

Webstral
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 02-01-2009, 08:06 PM
jester jester is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Equaly at home in the water, the mountains and the desert.
Posts: 919
Default

Mo;

Pineneedles, the small pointy leaves of evergreen pinetrees.

When green these can be boiled into a tea and are high in vitimin C.

Further, bark from many trees also contains vitimins and fiber.

I agree thistles and snails are easily produced as well.

I was thinking guinea pigs too but I chose to include them with rats and other rodents, I really hate the things! Although they were a staple in the precolumbian diet in South and Central America.

Oh, the minitature potbellied pigs could be something we may find in peoples yards as they raise this small pigs and chickens in home backyards as well.

In many areas of the US blackberries are very common to the point of being an invasion species that overgrows regular plants.

And in portions of the US South West cactus, the flat broadleaved type that produces the cactus or prickly pear. For both the leaf and the pear one must be carefull when removing them to avoid the cactus barbs and then peal them of their skin and any barbs remaining. The pear can be eaten or mashed into a jelly, the thick leaves cut into peices and eaten after cooking.


I remember reading a menu of a restraunt that specialized in "AZTEC" cuisine, and the most normal food on the menu was venison, everything else was ants, grubs, wasps, worns, snakes, lizards and beetles. And of course chocolate.
__________________
"God bless America, the land of the free, but only so long as it remains the home of the brave."
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 02-01-2009, 10:34 PM
Mohoender's Avatar
Mohoender Mohoender is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Near Cannes, South of France
Posts: 1,653
Default

Jest

I just didn't know you could eat pine needles. In fact, I couldn't even imagine it and that's why I asked. I thought it was something else. Thanks.
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 02-01-2009, 10:38 PM
Mohoender's Avatar
Mohoender Mohoender is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Near Cannes, South of France
Posts: 1,653
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Webstral
Our digestive tracts have a great deal more in common with the digestive tracts of rabbits (sans the cecum) than with wolves or cats.
Webstral
We have more in common with Pigs than with rabbits. Not only in the matter of food by the way.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Storing Food in T2K Mohoender Twilight 2000 Forum 63 02-25-2017 03:34 PM
Alternative Food Sources General Pain Twilight 2000 Forum 29 03-20-2009 09:16 AM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:55 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.