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  #421  
Old 03-31-2018, 08:01 PM
Matt Wiser Matt Wiser is online now
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Those who have run the Satellite Down module will recognize this class of ship, if not the lead unit...



The Virginia Class Cruisers in World War III


The Virginia class guided-missile cruisers were the largest class of nuclear surface combatants built for the U.S. Navy, until the postwar Puget Sound class strike cruisers. At the outbreak of war, they were the most capable nuclear cruisers in the U.S. Navy, primarily being employed as escorts for carrier battle groups. Planned as a five-ship class, only four were built, while the fifth, which was hoped to be equipped with AEGIS, was never funded.

The ships had an active war, escorting carrier battle groups, protecting their charges from air and submarine attack, and all four survived the war.


U.S.S. Virginia (CGN-38): Commissioned in 1976, she was active in the Atlantic Fleet at the beginning of the war, she had escorted the Eisenhower battle group on its last peacetime deployment. She remained with Eisenhower throughout the war, seeing combat during raids against Soviet-occupied Iceland, the liberation of Iceland, the Kola Raid, and operations in the Gulf of Mexico (GULF HAMMER and the reduction of the Brownsville Pocket). A brief yard period in 1986 had the “Fem Mods” (accommodations for female officers and crew) added. Virginia participated in the sinkings of three Soviet submarines: the Victor-I class SSN K-147 off Norfolk on 27 November 1985, the November-class SSN K-60 during the Liberation of Iceland in May, 1987, and the Tango-class SS B-319 on 8 June 1989, during the transit from Norfolk to the Gulf of Mexico. Virginia, during Gulf of Mexico operations, also took SAM shots at Soviet aircraft engaged in the airlift to Texas and Mexico, scoring several kills in the process. She was overhauled and refueled from 1994-1997, and after routine deployments with both the Sixth Fleet and the Fourth Fleet in the Caribbean, Virginia was decommissioned and stricken in 2014, and has been sold for scrap after defueling and all nuclear components removed.


U.S.S. Texas (CGN-39): Commissioned in 1977, she was active in the Pacific Fleet at the outbreak of war, as part of the Carl Vinson Battle Group. The group had returned from a WestPac deployment when war began, and as soon as war began, deployed to protect the California coast, and conducted carrier air strikes against targets in Baja California. Later, Texas participated in operations against Soviet convoys on the Alaska run, and in strikes against occupied Alaska and the Kamchatka Peninsula, protecting the carrier from Soviet air, submarine, and missile attack on several occasions. A brief yard period at San Diego followed, with the “Fem Mods” being added. Later, as part of the Vinson group, Texas also participated in the final reduction of the Soviet base at Cam Ranh Bay, before taking part in further raids against Kamchatka, the Kuriles, and Alaska, as well as covering the movement of forces into Alaska after the Soviet surrender in the Northern Theater in October, 1989. During the war, she sank three Soviet submarines: an unknown Whiskey-class SS on 24 March, 1986, the Juliett-class SSG K-63 during the Cam Ranh Bay strike, and the Charlie-I class SSGN K-25 on 6 October, 1989. (This was the last Soviet submarine sunk by USN surface vessels in the war) Overhauled and refueled in 1995-98, Texas resumed WestPac and Indian Ocean deployments with the Abraham Lincoln carrier group, before being decommissioned and stricken in 2015. She will be scrapped after defueling and all nuclear components have been removed.


U.S.S. Mississippi (CGN-40): Commissioned in 1978, she was part of the Nimitz carrier battle group in the Mediterranean when the war began, and she, along with the other escorts, was able to successfully defend the carrier against a “First Salvo” attack by the Soviet Mediterranean Squadron. The battle group then attacked the Soviet squadron, sinking several ships, before being diverted to attack targets in Libya, after the Soviet/Libyan occupation of Gibraltar. Mississippi then participated, with the battle group, in operations in the Eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean for much of 1986-7, taking part in the Liberation of Gibraltar and strikes against Libya and Soviet naval facilities in Syria. She also participated in strikes against both Cuba and Occupied Iceland, before the Liberation of Iceland and the Kola Raid, serving as AAW “Gatekeeper” to Nimitz. After Kola, a brief yard period followed, where she received the “Fem Mods” for female officers and crew. Mississippi then served with the carrier during operations against Cuba, before the Nimitz shifted to the Pacific Fleet, but she remained in the Atlantic Fleet. During her time with the Nimitz group, she sank three Soviet submarines: the Juliett class SSG K-67 on 6 September 1985, the Echo-II SSGN K-22 during the Iceland campaign, and the Foxtrot-class SS B-2 on 7 August 1987. She next provided AAW cover for the amphibious force in Operation GULF HAMMER, and again during the reduction of the Brownsville Pocket. After supporting the Cuba Blockade, she was part of the Theodore Roosevelt battle group, before her nuclear refueling and overhaul from 1997-2000.

After her yard period, Mississippi became part of the America battle group, seeing combat in the Cuba intervention and in the Baja War, supporting operations against the Mexican Gulf Coast. During the fall of the Rump USSR, the America battle group went to sea after DEFCON-3 was called, but saw no action. Mississippi is expected to decommission in FY 2017, and then she will be defueled, have her nuclear components removed, and then scrapped.


USS Arkansas (CGN-41): Commissioned in 1980, she was active in the Pacific Fleet as part of the Carl Vinson battle group. She participated in all of the Battle Group's actions in the initial part of the war, before being shifted to the Enterprise Battle Group in 1987, and the “Fem Mods” added during a brief yard period in San Diego. Arkansas participated in operations against Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kuriles, and also covered the movement into Alaska after the Soviet surrender in October, 1989. The Enterprise group then participated in Operation FORAGER II, the Liberation of Guam from North Korean occupation in November-December, 1989. After the war, she resumed normal deployments to WestPac and the Indian Ocean, with occasional anti-piracy operations in both Indonesian and Chinese waters. During the war, she participated in the sinking of two Soviet submarines: the November-class K-11, on 5 June 1987, during a raid on Alaska, and the Echo-I class SSN K-259 during the Kamchatka Raid. Arkansas also fired Tomahawks in that operation, and during FORAGER-II, sank an unidentified North Korean Romeo-class SS.

After her refueling and overhaul from 1998-2001, she returned to the Pacific Fleet, joining the Nimitz Battle Group. Arkansas participated in the Baja War in 2010, supporting the blockade of Mexico's Pacific Coast, and firing Tomahawk Cruise Missiles against targets in Mexico. The battle group put to sea during the fall of the Rump USSR, but saw no action. Arkansas is expected to decommission in FY 2018. She will be defueled, have all nuclear components removed, and then scrapped.


Class statistics:

Displacement: 11,300 full load

Length: 585 feet

Beam: 63 feet

Draft: 29.5 feet

Propulsion: 2 steam turbines driving two shafts for 60,000 shp

Reactors: 2 GE D2G Pressurized Water Reactors

Speed: 30+ knots

Crew:

CGN-38: 565 (45 Officers and 520 Enlisted)

CGN-39: 572 (39 Officers and 533 Enlisted)

CGN-40: 613 34 Officers and 579 Enlisted)

CGN-41: 562 (39 Officers and 523 Enlisted)

Missiles:

2 twin Mk 26 launchers for Standard-MR SAM

2 quad Mk 141 Harpoon SSM launchers

2 quad ABL launchers for Tomahawk SSM/TLAM

Guns:

2 single 5-inch 54 Mk 45 guns

2 20-mm Phalanx CIWS

Several pintle mounts for .50 caliber machine guns or Mk 19 AGL

ASW Weapons:

ASROC fired from forward Mk 26 launcher

2 triple Mk 32 torpedo tubes for Mk 46 torpedoes

Radars:

SPS-40B air search

SPS-48A 3-D search in GGN-38, 39, SPS-48C in CGN-40, 41

SPS-55 surface search

Sonar: SQS-53A bow-mounted

Helicopter: VERTREP area only: helicopter hangar with elevator originally provided. Issues with elevators and keeping the hangar watertight resulted in the hangar being sealed, and Tomahawk ABLs installed.

Fire-Control:

1 SWG-2 Tomahawk FCS

1 Mk 13 Weapon-direction system (replaced by Mk 14 WDS)

1 Mk 86 GFCS with SPG-60 and SPQ-9A radars

1 Mk 74 Missile FCS

1 MK 116 ASW FCS

2 SPG-51D radars

EW:

SLQ-25 Nixie

SLQ-32 (V)3 EW
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  #422  
Old 04-13-2018, 09:39 PM
Matt Wiser Matt Wiser is online now
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Any comments, thoughts, etc, fellows?
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  #423  
Old 04-16-2018, 04:38 PM
madmikechoi madmikechoi is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt Wiser View Post
Any comments, thoughts, etc, fellows?
Semi-pertinent one WRT to your M1 family write up.

I don't think Uncle Sugar would have dropped the dime for a M1 based heavy recovery vehicle- not when the 88A2 was significantly cheaper. Sometimes a 80% solution that can be delivered sooner and cheaper will win a contract. Interestingly enough, Teledyne Continental have cranked out 1500 hp version of the AVDS 1790 and that's fairly impressive with an air cooled V12 (although power going to the crank's gonna be a lot less since being air cooled you need a lot of power to run those cooling fans and those fans generally have to sit on top of the block). A good fit for the 88 let alone the M60 series which Uncle Sugar would need to retain because at some point numbers count; the US may have enough tanks for a Barbarossa or even two Kursk but what if we need to invade the Soviet hinterland twice and if we need to fight three or four epic battles and/or campaigns?

The Assault Breacher came about b/c of Big Army's failure of the Grizzly. Admittedly, a bucket arm would be pretty damn useful in reducing/neutralizing embankments/trenches and razor wire obstacles, etc. Still an argument can be made that combat engineers need both- a platform to launch line charges under armor and follow on to both plow through and wreck physical obstacles w/ the Garden Trowel of Doom (tm).


Third, building an ADA unit on a tank means one less tank. All things being equal- building tanks generally takes more resources than building an IFV/APC and there was already the LOS-F(H) ADATS (aka the original Bradley Linebacker). In fact a Twilight 2Kesque would have been a Bradley ADATS and a Bradley Blazer w/ two quad Stinger pods plus the GAU-12 w/ wide
FOV thermal, laser rangefinder/designator, and video/optical automatic tracking/lead; would have answered the ADA mantra of 3MI- mass, mix, mobility and integration and probably would have relegated the fiber optic FOG-M to either field arty or maneuver forces where it belonged.

I don't think anybody knows what a M1A3 would have been or will be since tank service lives tends to be extended w/ the new technologies driving doctrine or vice versa.
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  #424  
Old 04-16-2018, 07:33 PM
madmikechoi madmikechoi is offline
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And by failure, I mean failure to procure- either convincing the powers that be to listen that "union" of the army- believe or not every organization has a group of folks who advocate one pet project or the other b/c it benefits them either as individuals or as a group or both- the Wolverine bridge (the one with the Leguan Class 60-70 scissor bridge) or the Grizzly CEV. The ongoing War on Terror despite trying to wage it on the cheap has meant Big Army has had to axe numerous programs to support what amounts to a large brigade/small division sized force in Afghanistan and a kinda sorta corps sized force in Iraq until the Iraqis wouldn't give DC a SoFA agreement and now the US is sorta kinda back in Iraq if only because of ISIL; the fact that Arab armies for the most part are pretty much hopeless at all military aspects doesn't help. Usually most nations have at least a talent in one or more aspects at the art of war.
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  #425  
Old 04-16-2018, 09:02 PM
Matt Wiser Matt Wiser is online now
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Consider that in the Red Dawn timeline that M-1 chassis were being produced faster than turrets. With the failure of the M-247 (AKA SGT York), the Army needed a replacement for the M-163 Vulcan system right away. The production license for the Gepard turret was covertly acquired despite the neutralist government (Green-dominated) in West Germany, and the Gepard turrets fitted to the M-1 hull.

During the war, the Tunguska system was encountered on a number of occasions, and turned out to be very lethal. The Army wanted a similar system, but had to wait until after the war to get one. Hence the M-105 ADGS. M-1 style turret with two 35-mm guns and 12 ADATS missiles.
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  #426  
Old 04-17-2018, 07:38 PM
madmikechoi madmikechoi is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt Wiser View Post
Consider that in the Red Dawn timeline that M-1 chassis were being produced faster than turrets. With the failure of the M-247 (AKA SGT York), the Army needed a replacement for the M-163 Vulcan system right away. The production license for the Gepard turret was covertly acquired despite the neutralist government (Green-dominated) in West Germany, and the Gepard turrets fitted to the M-1 hull.

During the war, the Tunguska system was encountered on a number of occasions, and turned out to be very lethal. The Army wanted a similar system, but had to wait until after the war to get one. Hence the M-105 ADGS. M-1 style turret with two 35-mm guns and 12 ADATS missiles.
The problem with the mounting a Gepard turret on a M1 chassis is the fact the Leo's turret ring- at least from what I've been able to gather is 1980mm or a hair under 78 inches wheres the M1 series and M60s- 2159 or 85 inches. Supposedly the Leo 2's turret ring diameter is the same as its predecessor but don't quote me. That being said unless you start machining a fairly expensive adapter smaller turrets aren't going to fit on larger ring. IOW it would be fundamentally cheaper to develop a new turret with a similar armament setup and radar suite in that case.

Second, is one of the reason the DIVADS got the axe was besides dirty pool from the Left there was no way that any gun system at that time would reach out 6 km at slant ranges- at least not accurately and generally not with the self destruct of the fuzes go off. The Oerlikon KDAs and even the new revolver 35s are still 3500-4000m platforms even w/ the fancy new prefrag rounds and at the time 40mm L70 was the smallest proj that could use a proximity fuze (nowadays you can sort of cheat w/ in bore fuze setting and with a laser rangefinder to initiate detonation w/o putting what amounts to a radio antenna in the pointy end. Again, as a branch forgot it's own doctrine of mix- guns can do certain things pretty good, missiles can do some things pretty good, there is some overlap but not all so you need both.

Tunguska is a twofer. Yes, they wanted to replace the ZSU but at the time the Strela-10/SA-13 was still fairly new although I'm sure PVO SV might have overly worried about US jamming capabilities at the time against their second gen IR seekers. So it was a very expensive system that tried to address current liabilities and add capabilities to hedge future bets IMNSHO.


Finally, remember there were some really fairly cheap or soon to be cheap upgrades that could have been thrown on the M163 and the M48 Chap. Chaparral could have had the Chapfire system which included the ability to use the M299 quad Hellfire launcher, quad Stinger pods, and turret sighting systems of the Stinger Avenger. The Vulcan PIVADS could have lot the range only radar in favor of a Stinger pod, a laser rangefinder, and optics setup similar to the the M56 TOW nose found on the AH-1P/E/F (aka the AH-1S family).

If we go by accelerated development as usually found in war- we could expect the Alpha and Bravo model -92s to replaced almost from the getgo in 1985/86 w/ the Charlies aka Stinger RMP with introduction of the RMP Block 1 by the end of the war. A post war notional RMP Block 2 with an Igla like aerospike, an imaging IR seeker along w/ a laser proximity fuze would be ready for the long war after WWIII b/c there's now way any US administration would allow Mexico or the rest of Latin America to be a threat and by definition it would the annexation of a good deal if not all of Northern Mexico combined with a long counterinsurgency that would no doubt be bloody (Mexicans for all their faults are a fairly patriotic bunch and having lost half their country to the El Norte in 1848 they will not nor cannot abide losing another third even if they threw in their lot with a Red Army that lost)
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  #427  
Old 04-18-2018, 09:48 PM
Matt Wiser Matt Wiser is online now
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M-247 was a failure, period. It should be pointed out that Gepard turrets on the M-48 chassis were one of the contenders in the competition, but NIH kicked in,...

In the RD timeline, the Army wants an off-the shelf system NOW, Gepard on modified M-1 hulls met that requirement, as they need a system to keep up with the M-1/M-2 team. (another problem of SGT York: it couldn't keep up with the tanks it was supposed to protect) The M-105 ADGS is viewed by the Army as a logical successor to the M-1 Gepard.

Stinger RMP is fielded in 1987 TTL. Stinger-POST is the main version used from 1985 on, but RMP supplants it.
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