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  #31  
Old 06-26-2017, 09:32 PM
Adm.Lee Adm.Lee is offline
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Sending even a squadron of A10s to Panama seems like overkill when there's hundreds of Pact tanks to shoot in Europe and Iran.
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  #32  
Old 06-27-2017, 07:39 AM
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Sending even a squadron of A10s to Panama seems like overkill when there's hundreds of Pact tanks to shoot in Europe and Iran.
Thats true, Europe is a MUCH more target rich environment. Maybe move that to the A7's to help support the Amphibious capability and give a solid craft to give land forces?

Anyone have thoughts on the rest? All input is welcome as always...
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  #33  
Old 06-27-2017, 07:49 AM
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I put reactivated USMC reservist flying refurbished 12xF-4Ss in Panama in a composite squadron along with 4xC-130s and another 8xA-7Es flown by naval reservists.

I don't think you'ld have a full squadron of active duty 18xA-10s, but more like an 8 ship deployment of ANG or USAFR A-10s. Maybe a detachment of early 6xF-16As or reactivated A-7Ds as well. Everything organized to a composite wing.

Likely you'ld have at least one AC-130.

Never forget, Davis-Montham is being stripped of airframes as fast as they can be refurbished and put back in the air. Panama, being the relative backwater it would be, probably gets those aircraft.
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  #34  
Old 06-27-2017, 11:18 AM
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If you want to look at aircraft for Panama look at things like A-37's - they are a perfect match for that area and actually were the last place the US had them on active duty - with the Cold War going longer they may have stayed there

- but I agree you would need some kind of air superiority fighters there - but they might be survivors from earlier in the war that are still operational - i.e. the last three F-4's out of a group of fifteen or something like that
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  #35  
Old 06-27-2017, 11:30 AM
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Don't the F-16's handle air superiority? I love the A-37's but I wanted something with more punch so I thought the A-10 was the best suited. But I am changing that to the A-7 thinking all the A-10's would move overseas and fast.

Just need to find a suitable A-7 wing as the one I had in mind was moved to F-16's as below.


198th Tactical Fighter Squadron - San Juan PR: 24 F-16 A/B

24th Tactical Air Support Squadron: 10 A-37
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  #36  
Old 06-27-2017, 12:34 PM
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What about adding a Marine AV-8B squadron from the II MEF to replace the A-10/A-7 role and be able to support the amphibious capability? The 22nd MEU is part of the Fleet Marine Forces Atlantic as well...
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  #37  
Old 06-28-2017, 04:14 PM
dragoon500ly dragoon500ly is offline
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What about adding a Marine AV-8B squadron from the II MEF to replace the A-10/A-7 role and be able to support the amphibious capability? The 22nd MEU is part of the Fleet Marine Forces Atlantic as well...
For a MAU, they wouldn't deploy a full squadron, at most 4-6 Harriers.
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  #38  
Old 06-29-2017, 12:11 AM
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You can just make up a wing.

By 2000, you are going to have most air units grounded or disbanded. The way I saw it, from about spring 1996 till early 1998, you had most of Davis-Monthan emptied as they pulled airframes out, checked them out, and threw them back in service - minimal refurbishment for the most part.

A lot of these went to new squadrons. For example, probably over half of the A-10 airframes were in the bone yard. They would be standing up squadrons as fast as they could with every pilot they could get their hands on. Think Germany or Japan in 45 or the Brits and the Soviets in 40 - 41. So just make up a sqdn, stick colorful pilots in and go off to war.

Examples:
MICHAEL DORN
Dorn was an accomplished pilot and applied to a USAF initiative in April 1997 to allow pilots with at least 1,000 hours flight time including at least 250 hours jet time to apply as pilots up to age 40. Despite being older than 40, he managed to waive into the program. He was assigned to a newly formed Reserve F-20A unit in June 1997 and deployed to Europe in July 1997. His unit still actively flies sorties, and he is a quadruple-ace with three MiG-29s, one SU-30, three MiG-21s, two SU-24s, one SU-17, two SU-39s, one MiG-23BN, one MiG-23L, one MiG-23MLD, two MiG-27Ds, one SU-22, one TU-22, an Italian Tornado, an Italian AMX, and an Italian Alphajet credited as of 2000. One of the USAF top surviving aces, and 4th best in the F-20A.
Colt Double Eagle .45, Colt GAU-5/A/B w/4x optic

HARRISON FORD
A pre-war licensed pilot, in 2000 Ford routinely flies DIA operatives and Special Forces teams in and out of Mexican occupied California, Utah, Texas, Arizona, and New Mexico using his Cessna 208 Caravan. Also flies an F-100D SuperSabre with a militia unit based near NORAD Headquarters and has one DC-3 kill, an AN-22, a Jaguar, an L-39ZA, as well as a pair of helicopters credited. He has also tangled with MiG21Ms, MiG23BNs, and Mirage F1s, with one Mirage F1 recorded as probable and a MiG23BN damaged. Has been damaged in a dogfight with a Mirage 4000, losing his wingman in the encounter.
Also has flight time in a privately owned and restored MiG-17 and J.2, but has only flown the SuperSabre in combat.
Bushmaster A3 Carbine w/4x optic, Sterling SMG 9mm w/suppressor, S&W SW-380, Seecamp LWS-380, C.96 9mm w/reflex optic (a gift from a local gunsmith who restored a beat up mis-matched Broomhandle and modified it into a near-duplicate of Solo’s blaster from the “Star War” series)

KURT RUSSELL
Russell was a licensed pilot at the start of the war, but his age (45) prevented him from getting into the Air Force program for licensed pilots. However, he owned a P-47N Thunderbolt, and after Mexico invaded, was recruited and ended up flying missions in a militia unit operating near Vegas in his rearmed Thunderbolt (8xM3 .50). He managed to down a helicopter and damage a SU-17D before being recruited as part of an Army initiative to integrate fixed wing prop aircraft for close air support. He eventually ended up in the African Task Force flying his Thunderbolt, dubbed “Negro Lobo” (Black Wolf) with the volunteer group. He considers himself primarily an attack pilot, but often flies top cover for Army A-1 Skyraiders and OA-37s. He has cultivated a colorful reputation, wearing a large handlebar mustache, with nightly bouts of drinking and story-telling at various local bars. Well liked, and considered tough as hell. He has a black belt in Tae Kwon Do as well and can competently handle a katana or sword because of training he has done for films. Also skilled with a knife. He has also scored five other kills in Africa; an Aermacchi SF.260, a Chinese built J-5, a Chinese built J-2, a suspected Russian or Cuban transport, as well as a Mil-17 helicopter, bringing his confirmed total to six. Nominated for Air Force Cross.
HK-53 w/1x reflex sight, FN FAL 50-64, S&W 645, Colt 1911, Springfield M1 converted to mag feed and 7.62mm NATO

JOHN TRAVOLTA
A licensed pilot, Travolta applied to a USAF initiative in April 1997 to allow pilots with at least 1,000 hours flight time including at least 250 hours jet time to apply as pilots up to age 40. Travolta was admitted to the program, and arrived at Davis-Montham 5/97 where he was assigned to an A-10 unit being formed with the Missouri Air Guard and received his jet. His unit was activated and he was sent to Europe 7/97 operating from autobahn auxiliary fields. Awarded the Silver Star and Distinguished Flying Cross. One of the few pilots still regularly taking to the skies, doing so with the same A-10 he received at Davis-Montham - “Blood Ogre.” Credited with over 100 armored vehicles destroyed, and has downed three Mi-24s, a Ka-22, a Mi-8, a SU-22, two SU-25s, a L-39Z, an Italian Alphajet, and a SU-17D, as well as damaging an Italian Tornado. He is considered an exceptional low level attack pilot but maintains he is “just VERY lucky.” He has also been nominated for the Medal of Honor, and he has one of the best combat records of any pilot in Europe.
HK-33A2SG1 w/4-12x optic, Glock 19

QUAID BROTHERS
Randy and Dennis Quaid were experienced pilots at the start of the war. Two of the initial investors in the Heritage Aircraft Manufacturing Corp., they each purchased one of the early replica fighters to roll off the assembly line. Wanting something unusual and unique with panache, Randy selected a slightly modernized version of the Japanese Ki-84, while Dennis went with a similarly modernized American P-38L (GPS navigation, digital flight instrumentation, and autopilot).
Both Randy and Dennis remained active in the film and television business through 11/1997, even though active filming and production operations had largely ceased in the Los Angeles area. Neither had received a draft notice, and their collective families were at Dennis’ Montana ranch (in part to deter roving bands of Russian stragglers from the October fighting causing mischief) on TDM. After TDM, the brothers eventually became part of a militia unit. Both of their fighters have been rearmed (KI-84 with 2xM39 20mm cannon w/250 rpg and the P-38 with 2xM39 20mm cannon w/250 rpg and 2x.50 machinegun w/350 rpg), and they actively patrol into north Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona. Randy has shot down a Mil-24D Hind and Bell 412 helicopter and damaged a MiG-27J, and Dennis has downed a C-130, a DC-7, and damaged an L-39Z. They primarily fly attack missions and are usually escorted by a pair of F-86Hs that are also part of their militia unit.
Both fighters carry an historical paint scheme; Ki-84 in 85th Hiko-Sentai paint scheme and P-38 in 39th Fighter Squadron paint scheme. Randy likes to fly wearing a head scarf like a WWII kamikaze pilot, but instead of the Rising Sun, the scarf has an embroidered snarling tiger head superimposed over green dragon wings.
Randy: M3 SMG .45, Colt M1911A1 .45, Ruger 77 MkII .300 Magnum RSP
Dennis: M/45 9mm SMG, S&W M29 .44 magnum, Detonic Combat Master .45, Savage 110C .270

JIMMY BUFFET
Buffet had a colorful life before the war, and so it should not be surprising that his life after the war began continued to be colorful. After the war began, Florida National Guard and Air National Guard pilots and aircraft mechanics were largely activated, leaving a pronounced shortage of pilots for state service, and state governments requested civilian volunteers to take up the slack, enlarging and expanding the role of the civil air patrol organization. Buffet, an experienced multi-engine pilot, joined the CAP and began flying with them, learning to fly a number of military multi-engine aircraft including C-21s and C-130s. After TDM, Buffet ended up co-located with a Marine Reserve Squadron in north Florida, where during his free time, he fooled around on an A-7 simulator, racking up dozens of hours. In mid-1998, he found himself officially “drafted” as a Marine Corps Lieutenant and deployed flying C-130s, C-8As, C-21s, S3s, and A-7Es in a composite Navy Air Squadron operating from Sweden. Considered a true professional, he has a reputation of taking on difficult challenges. Credited with a submarine kill (in an S3) and sinking a Polish missile boat (in an A-7E) as well as one Polish SU-22 kill (in an A-7E).
KAC SR-16 16” w/reflex optic, SiG-229 SAS .357SiG, Walther P88 Compact 9mm, Astra A-100 .45

Of note: I allowed for a lot more planes flying, but sorties are down for fuel shortages.

Anyway, be a little creative and don't feel limited by the historical aircraft units in 1996. In four years of war; it'll change.
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  #39  
Old 06-29-2017, 11:17 AM
Olefin Olefin is offline
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"KURT RUSSELL
Russell was a licensed pilot at the start of the war, but his age (45) prevented him from getting into the Air Force program for licensed pilots. However, he owned a P-47N Thunderbolt, and after Mexico invaded, was recruited and ended up flying missions in a militia unit operating near Vegas in his rearmed Thunderbolt (8xM3 .50). He managed to down a helicopter and damage a SU-17D before being recruited as part of an Army initiative to integrate fixed wing prop aircraft for close air support. He eventually ended up in the African Task Force flying his Thunderbolt, dubbed “Negro Lobo” (Black Wolf) with the volunteer group. He considers himself primarily an attack pilot, but often flies top cover for Army A-1 Skyraiders and OA-37s. He has cultivated a colorful reputation, wearing a large handlebar mustache, with nightly bouts of drinking and story-telling at various local bars. Well liked, and considered tough as hell. He has a black belt in Tae Kwon Do as well and can competently handle a katana or sword because of training he has done for films. Also skilled with a knife. He has also scored five other kills in Africa; an Aermacchi SF.260, a Chinese built J-5, a Chinese built J-2, a suspected Russian or Cuban transport, as well as a Mil-17 helicopter, bringing his confirmed total to six. Nominated for Air Force Cross.
HK-53 w/1x reflex sight, FN FAL 50-64, S&W 645, Colt 1911, Springfield M1 converted to mag feed and 7.62mm NATO"

Damn love the idea of Kurt Russell being part of the 1st US Volunteer Mechanized Battalion in Kenya - i.e. his plane would be the P-47N on their roster

• Aircraft: two P-47D, one P-47N, three P-51D
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  #40  
Old 06-29-2017, 06:50 PM
The Dark The Dark is offline
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Quote:
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JIMMY BUFFET
Buffet had a colorful life before the war, and so it should not be surprising that his life after the war began continued to be colorful. After the war began, Florida National Guard and Air National Guard pilots and aircraft mechanics were largely activated, leaving a pronounced shortage of pilots for state service, and state governments requested civilian volunteers to take up the slack, enlarging and expanding the role of the civil air patrol organization. Buffet, an experienced multi-engine pilot, joined the CAP and began flying with them, learning to fly a number of military multi-engine aircraft including C-21s and C-130s. After TDM, Buffet ended up co-located with a Marine Reserve Squadron in north Florida, where during his free time, he fooled around on an A-7 simulator, racking up dozens of hours. In mid-1998, he found himself officially “drafted” as a Marine Corps Lieutenant and deployed flying C-130s, C-8As, C-21s, S3s, and A-7Es in a composite Navy Air Squadron operating from Sweden. Considered a true professional, he has a reputation of taking on difficult challenges. Credited with a submarine kill (in an S3) and sinking a Polish missile boat (in an A-7E) as well as one Polish SU-22 kill (in an A-7E).
KAC SR-16 16” w/reflex optic, SiG-229 SAS .357SiG, Walther P88 Compact 9mm, Astra A-100 .45
By 1994, Jimmy already had Navy Survival Training (it's mentioned in the report on his Grumman Widgeon crash in August 1994). I am a little dubious that he'd be flying attack aircraft in the late 90s; by 1998 he's fifty-one years old (turning fifty-two on Christmas Day of that year) and (IRL) he had no jet experience, so he'd either be flying jets after a couple years of off-and-on simulator training or prop aircraft with thirteen years of experience. My personal opinion is he'd more likely remain with prop transport or SAR aircraft, possibly even his personal HU-16C Albatross "Hemisphere Dancer" (which was shot at in Jamaica in 1996 and retired in 2003) to allow younger and fitter guys to take the jet aircraft.
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  #41  
Old 06-29-2017, 08:59 PM
mpipes mpipes is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Dark View Post
By 1994, Jimmy already had Navy Survival Training (it's mentioned in the report on his Grumman Widgeon crash in August 1994). I am a little dubious that he'd be flying attack aircraft in the late 90s; by 1998 he's fifty-one years old (turning fifty-two on Christmas Day of that year) and (IRL) he had no jet experience, so he'd either be flying jets after a couple years of off-and-on simulator training or prop aircraft with thirteen years of experience. My personal opinion is he'd more likely remain with prop transport or SAR aircraft, possibly even his personal HU-16C Albatross "Hemisphere Dancer" (which was shot at in Jamaica in 1996 and retired in 2003) to allow younger and fitter guys to take the jet aircraft.
Actually, my understanding is that he was multi-engine rated by 1994. He definitely has his commercial license now. If you watch the 1995 movie Congo, he is the 727 pilot, and I remember reading an article on the movie and it was commented at that time that he was licensed to fly it, so he was at least rated in 727s then. I had a girlfriend that grew up living by "Uncle Jimmy" and he was taking her up on multi-engine aircraft years before then. He flies a LOT and has a ton of hours by 1996. According to an article on the Widgeon landing accident he had in 1994, he had over 1500 hours logged; 400 in multiengine aircraft.
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  #42  
Old 06-29-2017, 11:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mpipes View Post
Buffet had a colorful life before the war, and so it should not be surprising that his life after the war began continued to be colorful. After the war began, Florida National Guard and Air National Guard pilots and aircraft mechanics were largely activated, leaving a pronounced shortage of pilots for state service, and state governments requested civilian volunteers to take up the slack, enlarging and expanding the role of the civil air patrol organization. Buffet, an experienced multi-engine pilot, joined the CAP and began flying with them, learning to fly a number of military multi-engine aircraft including C-21s and C-130s. After TDM, Buffet ended up co-located with a Marine Reserve Squadron in north Florida, where during his free time, he fooled around on an A-7 simulator, racking up dozens of hours. In mid-1998, he found himself officially “drafted” as a Marine Corps Lieutenant and deployed flying C-130s, C-8As, C-21s, S3s, and A-7Es in a composite Navy Air Squadron operating from Sweden. Considered a true professional, he has a reputation of taking on difficult challenges. Credited with a submarine kill (in an S3) and sinking a Polish missile boat (in an A-7E) as well as one Polish SU-22 kill (in an A-7E).
KAC SR-16 16” w/reflex optic, SiG-229 SAS .357SiG, Walther P88 Compact 9mm, Astra A-100 .45

Of note: I allowed for a lot more planes flying, but sorties are down for fuel shortages.

Anyway, be a little creative and don't feel limited by the historical aircraft units in 1996. In four years of war; it'll change.
Buffet has/had a Grumman Albatross at the time of the war. In '96 he was shot at by Jamaican authorities mistaking his plane for a drug courier. http://www.buffettworld.com/aviation/albatross/
JIMMY BUFFET
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  #43  
Old 06-30-2017, 05:20 AM
The Dark The Dark is offline
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Actually, my understanding is that he was multi-engine rated by 1994. He definitely has his commercial license now. If you watch the 1995 movie Congo, he is the 727 pilot, and I remember reading an article on the movie and it was commented at that time that he was licensed to fly it, so he was at least rated in 727s then. I had a girlfriend that grew up living by "Uncle Jimmy" and he was taking her up on multi-engine aircraft years before then. He flies a LOT and has a ton of hours by 1996. According to an article on the Widgeon landing accident he had in 1994, he had over 1500 hours logged; 400 in multiengine aircraft.
Yeah, I forgot about his Falcons. He's owned a pair of three-engine business jets over the years (a Falcon 50 and a Falcon 900). He's just much better known for his amphibians (the Widgeon, Albatross, pair of Caravans, and Goose). He has type ratings for the Cessna Citation, Falcons, and Albatross. I've never seen anything about him being qualified on the 727, but he could have let that expire since there are only a few dozen left.
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  #44  
Old 07-08-2017, 09:43 AM
Adm.Lee Adm.Lee is offline
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Sidebar: In the mid- and late-90s, I was becoming a bit of a Parrothead myself. I ran a Merc:2k campaign that was more-or-less centered in the Caribbean. Somewhat inspired by this, the PC group bought an Albatross after a big payout, so they could move to jobs more easily. One of the PCs already had some Pilot skill.

It also gave me an out if a player couldn't make a session: "So-and-so is guarding the plane this time."

IIRC, one adventure featured the NPCs from Buffett's novel "Where is Joe Merchant?", too.
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