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Old 01-14-2009, 01:35 PM
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Default Oceania OOB

That's what I came up with but this is post T2K v1.0 and v2.0. Nevertheless, it might be of use.

OCEANIA

Royal Australian Army
Brigadier Mike Hindmarsh, Major-General Duncan Lewis

Australian Army Korea
Third Division (Korea)
Manpower: 3800
Assets: 8 Leopard 1, 15 M113, 28 M113, 3 LAV-PIVAD, 8 M198

Land Command
Land HQ (Sydney, NSW)
- 7 Signal Regiment (Electronic Warfare) (Brisbane, Qld)
Manpower : 460
- 16 Air Defence Regiment (Integrated) (Adelaide, SA)
Manpower : 570
Assets : 11 Rapier, 29 GDF-35
- 6 Engineer Support Regiment (Brisbane, Qld)
Manpower: 580
- 21 Construction Regiment (Army Reserve) (Sydney, NSW)
Manpower: 660
- 22 Construction Regiment (Army Reserve) (Melbourne, Vic)
Manpower: 950
- 19 Chief Engineer Works (Integrated) (Sydney, NSW)
Manpower: 35
- 3 Intelligence Company (Sydney, NSW)
Manpower: 130
- 4 Intelligence Company (Darwin, NT)
Manpower: 130
- 1 MP Company (Darwin and Townsville)
Manpower: 90
- 2 MP Coimpany (Sydney, Canberra and Perth)
Manpower: 140
- 3 MP Company (Melbourne, Adelaide and Hobart)
Manpower: 150
- 4 MP Company (Brisbane)
Manpower: 80
- 5 Military Police Coy (Special Investigation Branch) (Canberra, ACT)
Manpower: 60
- 1 Armoured Regiment
Manpower: 530
Assets: 35 Leopard 1, 15 M113
- 2 Cavalry Regiment
Manpower: 1200
Assets: 92 LAV-25
- 3 Parachute Regiment
Manpower: 880
North West Mobile Force (NORFORCE) (Reserve) (HQ Darwin, NT)
- Arnhem Squadron (Nhulunbuy, NT)
Manpower: 650
- Centre Squadron (Alice Springs, NT)
Manpower: 400
- Darwin Squadron (Darwin, NT)
Manpower: 500
- Kimberley Squadron (Broome, WA)
Manpower: 700
- Operational Support Squadron (Darwin, NT)
Manpower: 290
- The Pilbara Regiment (Reserve) (HQ Karratha, WA)
Manpower: 2200
- 51 Battalion, Far North Queensland Regiment (Reserve) (HQ Cairns, Qld)
Manpower: 530
- 1 Aviation Regiment (Darwin, NT)
Manpower: 710
Assets: 12 OH-58, 12 PAH-2 Tiger, 3 Beech King Air, 2 DHC-6
- 5 Aviation Regiment (Brisbane, Qld)
Manpower: 510
Assets: 6 CH-47, 8 UH-1, 15 UH-60
Logistic Support Force (LSF/2970 troops)
- HQ LSF (Integrated) (Sydney, NSW)
Manpower: 750
- 2 Force Support Battalion (Integrated) (Hobart, Tas)
Manpower: 390
- 9 Force Support Battalion (Integrated) (Sydney, NSW)
Manpower: 250
- 10 Force Support Battalion (Integrated) (Townsville, Qld)
Manpower: 420
- 1 Health Support Battalion (Integrated) (Sydney, NSW)
Manpower: 460
- 2 Heath Support Battalion (Army Reserve) (Brisbane, Qld)
Manpower: 450
- 3 Health Support Battalion (Army Reserve) (Adelaide, SA)
Manpower: 250
First Division (10900 troops)
- HQ 1 Division (Integrated) (Brisbane, Qld)
Manpower: 1100
- 1 Brigade (Darwin, NT)
Manpower: 2300
Assets: 42 Leopard 1, 45 M113, 52 LAV-25, 6 M163 Vulcan, 6 LAV-
PIVAD, 10 M198
- 3 Brigade (Townsville, Qld)
Manpower: 2900
Assets: 46 M113, 6 M163 Vulcan, 14 L118 de 105
- 7 Brigade (Brisbane, Qld)
Manpower: 2750
Assets: 14 LAV-PIVAD, 74 LAV-25, 4 M198, 7 L118 de 105
- 11 Brigade (Reserve) (Townsville, Qld)
Manpower: 1850
Second Division (9650 troops)
- HQ 2 Division (Reserve) (Sydney, NSW)
Manpower: 850
- 4 Brigade (Reserve) (Melbourne, VIC)
Manpower: 2550
Assets: 62 M113, 11 M163 Vulcan, 6 105FH, 6 M198
- 5 Brigade (Reserve) (Sydney, NSW)
Manpower: 1650
Assets: 79 M113, 10 M163 Vulcan, 10 L118 de 105
- 8 Brigade (Reserve) (Sydney, NSW)
Manpower: 2200
Assets: 108 M113, 15 M163 Vulcan, 7 L118 de 105
- 9 Brigade (Reserve) (Adelaide, SA)
Manpower: 2150
Assets: 95 M113, 10 M163 Vilcan, 10 105FH
- 13 Brigade (Reserve) (Perth, WA)
Manpower: 1750
Assets: 37 M113, 4 M163 Vulcan, 4 105FH
Special Operations Command (2500 troops)
- Special Operations Command HQ (Canberra, ACT and Sydney, NSW)
Manpower: 600
Assets: 12 UH-60
- Special Air Service Regiment (Swanbourne Barracks, Perth, WA)
Manpower: 700
- 1 Commando Regiment (Reserve) (Sydney, NSW)
Manpower: 850
- Incident Response Regiment (Sydney, NSW)
Manpower: 350

Royal Australian Air Force
Headquarters No 395 Expeditionary Combat Support Wing (RAAF Townsville)
- No 381 Expeditionary Combat Support Squadron (RAAF Willamtown)
Manpower: 70
- No 382 Expeditionary Combat Support Squadron (RAAF Amberley)
Manpower: 100
- No 383 Expeditionary Combat Support Squadron (RAAF Amberley)
Manpower: 35
- No 386 Expeditionary Combat Support Squadron (RAAF Richmond)
Manpower: 85
Headquarters No 396 Combat Support Wing (RAAF Darwin)
- No 321 Combat Support Squadron (RAAF Darwin)
Manpower: 85
- No 322 Combat Support Squadron (RAAF Tindal)
Manpower: 70
- No 323 Combat Support Squadron (RAAF Townsville)
Manpower: 160
- No 324 Combat Support Squadron (Butterworth, Malaysia)
Manpower: 75
Headquarters Health Services Wing (RAAF AMB)
- No 1 Air Transportable Health Squadron (RAAF AMB)
Manpower: 120
- No 2 Air Transportable Health Squadron (RAAF WLM)
Manpower: 100
- No 3 Combat Support Hospital (RAAF Richmond)
Manpower: 310
Headquarters Airfield Defence Wing (RAAF Amberley)
- No 1 Airfield Defence Squadron (RAAF Edinburgh)
Manpower: 250
- No 2 Airfield Defence Squadron (RAAF Amberley)
Manpower: 190
- No 3 Airfield Defence Squadron (RAAF Amberley)
Manpower: 260
- No 4 Airfield Defence squadron
Manpower: 300
Headquarters Combat Reserve Wing (RAAF Glenbrook)
- No 13 Squadron (RAAF Darwin)
- No 21 Squadron (RAAF Williams (Laverton))
- No 22 Squadron (RAAF Richmond)
- No 23 Squadron (RAAF Amberley)
- No 24 Squadron (RAAF Edinburgh)
- No 25 Squadron (RAAF Pearce)
- No 26 Squadron (RAAF Williamtown)
- No 27 Squadron (RAAF Townsville)
- No 28 Squadron (Canberra International Airport)
- No 29 Squadron (Anglesea Barracks, Hobart)
Headquarters No 92 Wing (RAAF Edinburgh)
- No. 2 Squadron (2 EP-3 Orion, 6 B737 Wedgetail AEW&C on order)
- No 10 Squadron (8 AP-3C Orion)
- No 11 Squadron (9 AP-3C Orion)
- No 292 Squadron (3 TAP-3B Orion)
Headquarters No 82 Wing (RAAF Amberley)
- No. 1 Squadron (10 F-111C, 4 RF-111C)
- No. 6 Squadron (7 F-111C, 7 F-111G)
- Forward Area Control Development Unit (4 PC-9/A(F))
Headquarters No 81 Wing (RAAF Williamtown)
- No 3 Squadron (14 F/A-18A/B Hornet)
- No 75 Squadron (RAAF Tindal) (14 F/A-18A/B Hornet)
- No 77 Squadron (14 F/A-18A/B Hornet)
Headquarters No 78 Wing (RAAF Williamtown)
- No 2 Squadron (14 F/A-18A/B Hornet)
- No 76 Squadron (16 Hawk 127)
- No 79 Squadron (RAAF Pearce) (16 Hawk 127)
- No 278 Squadron (14 F/A-18A/B Hornet)
Headquarters No 84 Wing (RAAF Richmond)
- No 32 Squadron (RAAF East Sale) (King Air 350)
- No 33 Squadron (4 Boeing 707 tanker)
- No 34 Squadron (Canberra International Airport) (2 737 BBJ,
3 Challenger CL-604)
Headquarters No 86 Wing
- No 36 Squadron (11 C-130H, 1 EC-130H)
- No 37 Squadron (12 C-130J-30)
- No 38 Squadron (RAAF Amberley) (14 DHC4 Caribou)
Headquarters Aerospace Operational Support Group
- Aircraft Research and Development Unit
- Aerospace Systems Test Squadron
- Aerospace Systems Engineering Squadron
Headquarters Air Training Wing (RAAF East Sale)
- Central Flying School (24 PC-9/A)
- No 2 Flying Training School (RAAF Pearce) (22 PC-9/A)

Royal Australian Navy
- Clearance Diving Team 1 (Sydney, NSW)
- Clearance Diving Team 3
- Clearance Diving Team 4 (Fleet Base West, Perth, WA)

The six Collins Class Submarines HMAS Collins, Farncomb, Waller, Dechaineux, Sheean and Rankin are all equipped to embark and land a small special forces detachment in addition to their regular crew. Each submarine has spare berths sufficient for a SAS Patrol.
The Fremantle Class Patrol boats have the wartime mission of carrying and supporting special forces parties.

HMAS Tobruk
HMAS Kanimbla
HMAS Manoora

NEW ZEALAND
Force Troops (5250 troops)
- 1 New Zealand SAS Group (Papakura Camp)
Manpower: 290
- Military Police Company (Trentham Camp)
Manpower: 60
- Royal New Zealand Infantry Regiment
Manpower: 950
Assets: 28 LAV-25
- 3 Brigade (Burnham Camp)
Manpower: 1300
- 7 Brigade (Linton Camp)
Manpower: 2650
Assets: 7 Scorpion, 19 M113, 4 L118 de 105, 10 GDF-35
RNZAF
RNZAF Base Auckland (510 personnel)
- No. 3 Squadron
Manpower: 140
Aircrafts: 5 OH-58, 5 UH-60, 14 UH-1H
- No. 5 Squadron
Manpower: 130
Aircrafts: 6 P-3K Orion
- No. 40 Squadron
Manpower: 140
Aircrafts: 2 Boeing 727, 5 C-130H
- No. 75 Squadron
Manpower: 100
Aircrafts: 7 A-4K Skyhawks
RNZAF Base Ohakea (400 personnel)
- No. 2 Squadron
Manpower: 120
Aircrafts: 17 MB-339
- No. 42 Squadron
Manpower: 200
Aircrafts: 5 Beech King Air, 12 PC-9
- No. 75 Squadron
Manpower: 80
Aircrafts: 10 A-4K Skyhawks

FIJI
Colonel Raubuka
Fiji Army
- Fiji Police Force
Manpower: 1500
- Zulu Company (Special Forces)
Manpower: 120
- Fiji Support Regiment
Manpower: 950
- Fiji Engineer Regiment
Manpower: 500
- 1st Fiji Infantry Battalion
Manpower: 750
Assets: 4 105FH
- 2nd Fiji Infantry Battalion
Manpower: 340
- 3rd Fiji Infantry Battalion
Manpower: 600
- Fiji Territorial Reserve Regiment
Manpower: 2000
- Fiji Air Wing
Manpower: 100h
Assets: 2 OH-58
- Fiji Naval Division
Manpower: 300

PAPUA NEW GUINEA
Papua New Guinea Defence Force
Headquarters Land Element (Port Moresby)
- PNGDF HQ
Manpower: 200
- Provost Company
Manpower: 120
- Support Battalion
Manpower: 350
- Defence Health Center
Manpower: 80
The Royal Pacific Islands Regiment
- 1st Battalion (Port Moresby)
Manpower: 430
Assets: 2 Shorland S-55, 2 mortar 120
- 2nd Battalion (Wewak)
Manpower: 620
Assets: 3 Shorland S-55, 2 mortar 120
- 3rd Battalion (Lae)
Manpower: 210
- Engineer Battalion (Lae)
Manpower: 440
PNGDF Maritime Element
- Support Squadron
Manpower: 70
- Patrol Boat Squadron
Manpower: 100
Assets: Pacific Forum patrol boats Tarangau, Dreger, Seeadler, Basilisk
Vosper Type patrol boats Aitape, Samaria, Ladava
- Landing Craft Squadron
Manpower: 40
Assets: Balikpapan landing craft heavy Salamaua, Buna
4 generic small landing craft
1 tug boat
Air Transport Squadron (Jackson’s Airport, Port Moresby)
Manpower: 200
Assets: 2 CN-235, 4 IAI Arava, 4 BN-2B, 6 UH-1

TONGA
Tongan Defence Services [ T.D.S. ]
Land Forces
- Tongan HQ
Manpower: 140
Assets: 2 T-34C Mentor, 1 BN-2B
- Tongan Royal Guards Regiment
Manpower: 200
Assets: 2 500MD, 2 Sea King S-61
- Tonga Police Department
Manpower: 420
- Tonga Infantry Battalion
Manpower: 360
Assets: 4 105FH
- 1st, 2nd, 3rd & 4th Reserve Companies
Manpower: 250 each
Royal Tonga Navy
- T.D.S. Maritime Division
Manpower: 130
Assets: Pacific Forum patrol boats Neiafu, Pangai, Savea
Royal Yacht “Titilupe”
Landing Craft [ LCM-8 , “HMAV Late” ]
- Royal Tongan Marines
Manpower: 50
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  #2  
Old 01-14-2009, 01:37 PM
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Mohoender Mohoender is offline
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Default Oceania 1st archive (source: Nick Dowding)

Australian Army 2005 – Land Command and Special Operations Command
Version 1.2
Nick Dowling
Background and how to read this document
Land Command is responsible for overseeing the Australian Army’s conventional units. Training units fall under the command of Training Command, and special forces units are commanded by the recently established Special Operations Command.
Sub-units are listed in the document only where I have been able to confirm the name and existence of these units. Unconfirmed sub-units are described in footnotes. Except where specifically indicated, all listed sub units share the status and location of their superior unit. For example, 6 Engineer Support Regiment’s Headquarters, 1 Topographic Survey Squadron and 21 Construction Squadron are located in Brisbane in the State of Queensland, while 17 Construction squadron in located in Sydney. Except for the integrated 1 Survey Squadron, all the sub-units of the regiment are manned by Regulars.
Australian Army units come in three status categories:
• Regular – Manned exclusively by full time soldiers
• Army Reserve – Made up of part time soldiers, normally with a small number of regulars providing specialist services
• Integrated – Manned by a combination of regulars and reservists. The pattern for this manning differs from unit to unit – in some units the regulars only man the support elements and elements which require extensive training, and in other units regulars and reservists have similar jobs in comparable sub-units.
In the following document, Army Reserve and Integrated units are specifically identified. All other units are manned solely by Regulars.
Sub-units are listed in the document only where I have been able to confirm the name and existence of these units. Unconfirmed sub-units are described in footnotes. Except where specifically indicated, all listed sub units share the status and location of their superior unit. For example, 6 Engineer Support Regiment’s Headquarters, 1 Topographic Survey Squadron and 21 Construction Squadron are located in Brisbane in the State of Queensland, while 17 Construction squadron in located in Sydney. Except for the integrated 1 Survey Squadron, all the sub-units of the regiment are manned by Regulars.
Please send any comments or/and corrections to me at: nick_dowling@hotmail.com


Land Command

Land Headquarters (LHQ)
Land HQ (Sydney, NSW)
7 Signal Regiment (Electronic Warfare) (Brisbane, Qld)
110 Signal Squadron (Sydney, NSW)
16 Air Defence Regiment (Integrated) (Adelaide, SA)
110 Air Defence Battery (Regular?) (Rapier)
111 Air Defence Battery (RBS-70)
6 Engineer Support Regiment (Brisbane, Qld)
1 Topographic Survey Squadron (Integrated) (Brisbane, Qld)
Data Support Troop
Formation Troop
Force Troop
Operational Support Troop
17 Construction Squadron (Sydney, NSW)
8 Construction Troop
Resources Troop
Plant Troop
21 Construction Squadron (Brisbane, Qld)
21 Construction Regiment (Army Reserve) (Sydney, NSW)
22 Construction Regiment (Army Reserve) (Melbourne, Vic)
105 Construction Squadron
106 Construction Squadron
39 Electrical and Mechanical Squadron
19 Chief Engineer Works (Integrated) (Sydney, NSW)
11 Works Team (Regular)
12 Works Team (Regular)
198 Works Team (Regular)
Hydrographic Survey Team (Army Reserve)
1 Intelligence Battalion (Sydney, NSW)
3 Intelligence Company
4 Intelligence Company (Darwin, NT)
1 Military Police Battalion (Integrated) (Sydney, NSW)
1 Military Police Company (Darwin and Townsville)
2 Military Police Company (Sydney, Canberra and Perth)
3 Military Police Company (Melbourne, Adelaide and Hobart)
4 Military Police Company (Brisbane)
5 Military Police Company (Special Investigation Branch) (Canberra, ACT)
1 Ground Liaison Group (Integrated) (Sydney, NSW)
Australian Contingent, Multi-National Observer Force Sinai (North Camp, El Gorah, Egypt)
North West Mobile Force (NORFORCE) (Army Reserve) (HQ Darwin, NT)
Arnhem Squadron (Nhulunbuy, NT)
Centre Squadron (Alice Springs, NT)
Darwin Squadron (Darwin, NT)
Kimberley Squadron (Broome, WA)
Operational Support Squadron (Darwin, NT)
The Pilbara Regiment (Army Reserve) (HQ Karratha, WA)
1 Squadron (Port Headland, WA)
2 Squadron (Exmouth, WA)
3 Squadron (Perth, WA)
Operational Support Squadron (Karratha, WA)
51 Battalion, The Far North Queensland Regiment (Army Reserve) (HQ Cairns, Qld)
A Company (Cairns, Qld)
B Company (Weipa, Qld)
C Company (Thursday Island, Qld)
D Company (Mt Isa, Qld)
Operational Support Company (Cairns, Qld)
16 Brigade (Aviation)
HQ 16 Brigade (Brisbane, Qld)
Aviation Support Group Workshop (Oakey, Qld)
1 Aviation Regiment (Oakey, Qld)
HQ Squadron
Technical Support Squadron
161 Reconnaissance Squadron (Darwin, NT) (Bell 206B-1/CA-32 helicopter)
162 Reconnaissance Squadron (Bell 206B-1/CA-32 helicopter)
173 Surveillance Squadron (Beech 200, Beech 350, DHC 6 Twin Otter) (Oakey, Qld and Darwin, NT)
5 Aviation Regiment (Townsville, Qld)
HQ Squadron
Transport Troop
Catering Troop
Aircraft Support Troop
Quartermaster Store
Technical Support Squadron
HQ Troop
Aircraft Repair Troop
Ground Equipment Repair Troop
Logistics Troop
A Squadron (8 UH-1 Iroquois)
B Squadron (12 S-70A Blackhawk)
C Squadron (6 CH-47D Chinook)

Logistic Support Force (LSF)
HQ LSF (Integrated) (Sydney, NSW)
HQ Force Support Group (Sydney, NSW)
130 Signal Squadron (Sydney, NSW)
145 Signal Squadron (Sydney, NSW)
1 Petrol Company (Army Reserve) (Melbourne, Vic)
3 Recovery Company (Army Reserve) (Melbourne, Vic)
Deployed Forces Support Unit (Integrated) (Sydney, NSW)
2 Force Support Battalion (Integrated) (Hobart, Tas)
9 Force Support Battalion (Integrated) (Sydney, NSW)
10 Force Support Battalion (Integrated) (Townsville, Qld)
1 Health Support Battalion (Integrated) (Sydney, NSW)
Environmental Health Platoon
Surgical Company
Holding Company
Clinical Company
Operational Support Company
2 Heath Support Battalion (Army Reserve) (Brisbane, Qld)
3 Health Support Battalion (Army Reserve) (Adelaide, SA)
1 Psychology Unit (Sydney, NSW)
Ship Army Detachment HMAS Tobruk
Ship Army Detachment HMAS Kanimbla
Ship Army Detachment HMAS Manoora


First Division
Deployable Joint Force Headquarters (DJFHQ) (Integrated) (Brisbane, Qld)
20 Surveillance and Target Acquisition Regiment (forming) (Brisbane, Qld)
131 Surveillance and Target Acquisition Battery (Integrated)
132 Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Battery (forming)
Combat Service and Support Battery (forming)
1 Joint Support Unit (Integrated) (Brisbane, Qld)
Communications Information Systems Squadron
Combat Services Support Squadron

1 Brigade
HQ 1 Brigade (Darwin, NT)
1 Armoured Regiment (51 Leopard 1A3) (Integrated) (Darwin, NT)
A Squadron
B Squadron
C Squadron (Reserve?)
Combat Services Support squadron
2 Cavalry Regiment (ASLAV) (Darwin, NT)
A Squadron
B Squadron
C Squadron
Support Squadron
8/12 Medium Regiment (Darwin, NT)
101 Medium Battery (M198 155mm howitzer)
103 Medium Battery (M198 155mm howitzer)
Technical Support Troop
1 Combat Engineer Regiment (Darwin, NT)
1 Field Squadron
23 Support Squadron
Operational Support Squadron
1 Command Support Regiment (Darwin, NT)
104 Signals Squadron
Support Squadron
5/7 Battalion, The Royal Australian Regiment (Mechanised) (Darwin, NT)
1 Combat Service Support Battalion (Darwin, NT)
3 Brigade
HQ 3 Brigade (Townsville, Qld)
Brigade Reconnaissance Platoon
B Squadron, 3/4 Cavalry Regiment (APC) (M113) (Integrated) (Townsville, Qld)
4 Field Regiment (L118 105mm Howitzer) (Townsville, Qld)
A Battery (Sydney, NSW)
107 Field Battery
108 Field Battery
3 Combat Engineer Regiment (Townsville, Qld)
16 Field Squadron
18 Field Squadron
25 Support Squadron
3 Command Support Regiment (Townsville, Qld)
103 Signal Squadron
Support Squadron
1 Battalion, The Royal Australian Regiment (Townsville, Qld)
A Company
B Company
C Company
D Company
Support Company
2 Battalion, The Royal Australian Regiment (Townsville, Qld)
A Company
B Company
C Company
D Company
Support Company
3 Battalion, The Royal Australian Regiment (Parachute) (Sydney, NSW)
A Company
B Company
C Company
Support Company
3 Combat Service Support Battalion (Townsville, Qld)

7 Brigade
HQ 7 Brigade (Integrated) (Brisbane, Qld)
2/14 Light Horse Regiment (Queensland Mounted Infantry) (ASLAV) (Integrated) (Brisbane, QLD)
1 Field Regiment (L118 105mm howitzer) (Integrated) (Brisbane, Qld)
13 Field Battery (Army Reserve)
41 Field Battery (Army Reserve)
105 Medium Battery (M198 155mm howitzer)
2 Combat Engineer Regiment (Integrated) (Brisbane, Qld)
7 Command Support Regiment (Integrated) (Brisbane, Qld)
139 Signal Squadron
Support Squadron
6 Battalion, The Royal Australian Regiment (Motorised) (Brisbane, Qld)
9 Battalion, The Royal Queensland Regiment (Motorised) (Army Reserve) (Brisbane, Qld)
25/49 Battalion, The Royal Queensland Regiment (Motorised) (Army Reserve) (Brisbane, Qld)
A Company (Toowomba, Qld)
B Company (Toowomba, Qld)
C Company
Support Company
7 Combat Service Support Battalion (Integrated) (Brisbane, Qld)
Transport Company
Medical Company
Dental Company
Workshop Company
Supply Company
Administrative Company.
11 Brigade
HQ 11 Brigade (Army Reserve) (Townsville, Qld)
35 Field Squadron, 11 Combat Engineer Regiment (Army Reserve) (Mount Isa, Qld)
11 Command Support Regiment (141 Signal Squadron) (Army Reserve) (Townsville, Qld)
31 Battalion, The Royal Queensland Regiment (Army Reserve) (Townsville, Qld)
42 Battalion, The Royal Queensland Regiment (Army Reserve) (Rockhampton, Qld)
11 Combat Service Support Battalion (Army Reserve) (Townsville, Qld)

Second Division
HQ 2 Division (Army Reserve) (Sydney, NSW)
8 Signal Regiment (Army Reserve) (Sydney, NSW)
Communications Information Systems Squadron (Canberra, ACT)
Support Squadron
4 Brigade
HQ 4 Brigade (Army Reserve) (Melbourne, VIC)
4/19 Prince of Wales Light Horse (Recon) (M113) (Army Reserve)
A Squadron (Wodonga, Vic)
B Squadron (Sale, Vic)
Combat Services Support Squadron
Training Squadron
2/10 Medium Regiment (Army Reserve)
22 Field Battery (M2A2 105mm Howitzer) (Melbourne, Vic)
38 Medium Battery (M198 155mm howitzer) (Geelong, Vic)
4 Combat Engineer Regiment (Army Reserve)
10 Field Squadron
38 Support Squadron
108 Signal Squadron (4 Command Support Regiment)
5/6 Battalion, The Royal Victorian Regiment (Army Reserve) (Melbourne, Vic)
A Company
B Company
C Company
D Company
Support Company
8/7 Battalion, The Royal Victorian Regiment (Army Reserve) (Ballarat, Vic)
A Company (Geelong, Vic)
B Company
C Company (Warrnambool, Vic)
Support Company
4 Combat Service Support Battalion (Army Reserve) (Melbourne, Vic)
Medical Company
Dental Company
Transport Squadron
Supply Company
Workshop Company
5 Brigade
HQ 5 Brigade (Army Reserve) (Sydney, NSW)
1/15 Royal New South Wales Lancers (Recon) (M113) (Army Reserve) (Sydney, NSW)
23 Field Regiment (L118 105mm howitzer) (Army Reserve) (Sydney, NSW)
10 Field Battery (Sydney and Canberra, ACT)
11 Field Battery
5 Combat Engineer Regiment (Army Reserve) (Sydney, NSW)
142 Signal Squadron (5 Command Support Regiment) (Army Reserve) (Sydney, NSW)
1/19 Battalion, The Royal New South Wales Regiment (Army Reserve) (Orange, NSW)
A Company (Wagga Wagga, NSW)
B Company (Bathurst, NSW)
D Company (Dubbo, NSW)
Support Company
4/3 Battalion, The Royal New South Wales Regiment (Army Reserve) (Sydney, NSW)
5 Combat Service Support Battalion (Army Reserve) (Sydney, NSW)
8 Brigade
HQ 8 Brigade (Army Reserve) (Sydney, NSW)
12/16 Hunter River Lancers (APC) (M113) (Army Reserve) (Tamworth, NSW)
A Squadron (Armidale, NSW)
B Squadron (Muswellbrook, NSW)
C Squadron(?)
Operational Support Squadron
7 Field Regiment (L118 105mm howitzer) (Army Reserve) (Sydney, NSW)
23 Field Battery (Sydney, NSW)
113 Field Battery (Newcastle/Central Coast, NSW)
8 Combat Engineer Regiment (Army Reserve) (Newcastle, NSW)
14 Combat Engineer Squadron (Newcastle, NSW)
26 Combat Engineer Squadron (Sydney, NSW)
Operational Support Squadron (Newcastle, NSW)
155 Signal Squadron (8 Command Support Regiment) (Army Reserve) (Sydney, NSW)
2/17 Battalion, The Royal New South Wales Regiment (Army Reserve) (Sydney, NSW)
A (Scottish) Company
B Company (Gosford, NSW)
C Company (Newcastle, NSW)
D Company
E Company
Support Company
41 Battalion, The Royal New South Wales Regiment (Army Reserve) (Lismore, NSW)
A Company (Murwillumbah, NSW)
C Company (Coffs Harbour, NSW)
D Company (Taree, NSW)
Support Company
8 Combat Service Support Battalion (Army Reserve) (Sydney, NSW)
HQ & Logistic Support Company (Newcastle, NSW)
Transport Company (Newcastle, NSW)
Health Services Company (Sydney and Newcastle, NSW)
Supply Company (Sydney, NSW)
Workshop Company (Newcastle, NSW)
9 Brigade
HQ 9 Brigade (Army Reserve) (Adelaide, SA)
3/9 Light Horse (South Australian Mounted Rifles) (APC) (M113) (Army Reserve) (Adelaide, SA)
6/13 Field Regiment (M2A2 105mm howitzer) (Adelaide, SA) (Army Reserve)
16 Field Battery (Launceston, Tas)
48 Field Battery (Adelaide, SA)
3 Field Squadron 9 Combat Engineer Regiment (Army Reserve)
144 Signal Squadron (9 Command Support Regiment) (Army Reserve) (Adelaide, SA)
10/27 Battalion, The Royal South Australian Regiment (Army Reserve) (Adelaide, SA)
12/40 Battalion, The Royal Tasmanian Regiment (Army Reserve) (Hobart, Tas)
A Company
B Company
C (Training) Company
Support Company
9 Combat Service Support Battalion (Army Reserve) (Adelaide, SA)
Transport Company
Health Company
Supply Company
Maintenance Company
Logistic Support Company
13 Brigade
HQ 13 Brigade (Army Reserve) (Perth, WA)
A Squadron, 10 Light Horse Regiment (Recon) (M113) (Army Reserve) (Perth, WA)
7 Field Battery, 3 Field Regiment (M2A2 105mm howitzer) (Army Reserve) (Perth, WA)
13 Field Squadron, 13 Combat Engineer Regiment (Army Reserve) (Perth, WA)
109 Signal Squadron (13 Command Support Regiment) (Army Reserve) (Perth, WA)
11/28 Battalion, The Royal West Australian Regiment (Army Reserve) (Perth, WA)
16 Battalion, The Royal West Australian Regiment (Integrated) (Perth, WA)
13 Combat Service Support Battalion (Army Reserve) (Perth, WA)
Health Services Company
Workshop Company
Supply Company
Administration Company
Transport Company


Special Operations Command
Australia’s Special Operations Command is of equivalent status to Australia’s Maritime, Land and Air Commands. All its’ constituent units are drawn from the Australian Army. It is modelled on the equivalent commands in the United States and British militaries.
Special Operations Command was established in May 2003, and will be fully operational when a range of enhancement programs are completed in 2007.
Special Operations Command
Special Operations Command HQ (Canberra, ACT and Sydney, NSW)
171 Squadron (12 S-70 Blackhawk) (Townsville, Qld)
Special Air Service Regiment (Swanbourne Barracks, Perth, WA)
1 Squadron
2 Squadron
3 Squadron
152 Signals Squadron
Base Squadron
Training Squadron
1 Commando Regiment (Army Reserve) (Sydney, NSW)
1 Commando Company (Sydney, NSW)
2 Commando Company (Melbourne, Vic)
301 Signals Squadron (Sydney and Melbourne)
4 Battalion, The Royal Australian Regiment (Commando) (Sydney, NSW)
A Company
B Company
C Company
Tactical Assault Group (East)
126 Signals Squadron
Operations Support Company
Logistics Support Company
Incident Response Regiment (Sydney, NSW)
Chemical, Biological and Radiological Response Squadron
Emergency Response Squadron (Integrated) (Sydney, Townsville, Darwin,
Oakey)
Scientific and Technical Organisation
Special Operations Combat Service Support Company (Sydney, NSW)
Major Equipment
Taken from Asia-Pacific Defence Reporter Source Book 2003-2004 and The Military Balance 2001
59 M1A1D (on order)
71 Leopard 1A3 (30 in reserve)
111+ ASLAV, divided into: 47 ASLAV-25, 33 ASLAV-PC, 9 ASLAV-C, 2 ASLAV Ambulance, 6 ASLAV-F, 4 ASLAV-R and 6 of other variants (150 additional vehicles on order, deliveries began in mid 2004)
700 M-113 (all variants) (About 350 to be modernised, 259 to M113AS standard)
289 Bushmaster Infantry Mobility Vehicles (deliveries to begin in 2005)
246 M2A2/L5 105mm Towed
104 L118 Hamel 105mm Towed
36 M-198 155mm Towed
296 81mm Mortar
591 Carl Gustav (84mm RCL)
19 Rapier SAM
17 RBS-70 SAM (more to be acquired)
14 RASIT
AN-TPQ-36
15 Landing Craft Medium (to be replaced)
Army Aviation
22 Tiger Armed Reconnaissance helicopters on order, deliveries to begin in 2005
36 S-70A Blackhawk
43 Bell 206 B-1 Kiowa
25 UH-1H Iroquois
17 AS-350B Squirrel
12 MH-90 medium transport helicopters on order
6 CH-47D Chinook
3 Super King Air 200
2 DHC-6 Twin Otter
Notes
The Australian Army has a strength of 25,289 regulars and 17,172 reservists. There are a total of 2,537 women in the Army. The Army’s budget for the 2004-05 financial year is $A 5.267 Billion.
The Army’s readiness target is to have a battalion group ready for short-notice contingency operations, maintain five high-readiness battalion groups and one commando unit, develop an enhanced special forces capability, and maintain the capacity to sustain a brigade group outside Australia indefinitely. This target has never been met.
Australia’s two ‘divisions’ exist for administrative purposes only. The Australian Army has not deployed a divisional sized formation since 1945 and does not expect to so in the future.
DFJHQ/1st Division is mainly made up of a mix of regular and reserve units based in Australia’s northern states, and 2nd Division consists solely of reservist formations based in the other states. It should be noted that there are no division level combat units – aside from the Divisional HQs and signals elements, all units are assigned to Land Command or the various brigades.
All Land Command units are below their authorised strength. According a 2000 Senate Inquiry, the brigades were at the following strength:
DJFHQ/1st Division:
1 Brigade (Regular): approximately 70 per cent of operational strength
3 Brigade (Regular): approximately 85 per cent of operational strength
7 Brigade (Integrated): approximately 73 per cent of operational strength
11 Brigade (Army Reserve): approximately 30 per cent of operational strength
2nd Division:
4 Brigade (Army Reserve): approximately 40 per cent of operational strength
5 Brigade (Army Reserve): approximately 30 per cent of operational strength
8 Brigade (Army Reserve): approximately 32 per cent of operational strength
9 Brigade (Army Reserve): approximately 35 per cent of operational strength
13 Brigade (Army Reserve): approximately 30 per cent of operational strength
While the low level of manning of reserve brigades does indicate severe recruitment problems, it should be noted that these brigades are intended to serve as ‘skeleton’ units to facilitate the rapid expansion of the Army, and are not intended to be maintained at full strength.
Most of the Australian Army’s infantry battalions are organised as light infantry (the exceptions being 5/7 RAR (Mechanised), 3 RAR (Parachute) and the three motorised battalions in 7 Brigade.
The TO&E of a full strength Australian Light Infantry Battalion is currently:
Battalion HQ
Administration Company
Transport Platoon
Quartermasters Platoon
Catering Platoon
Technical Support Platoon
Medical Platoon
Support Company
Signals Platoon
Mortar Platoon
Mortar Section (x 3) 2 x 81mm mortar
Assault Pioneer Platoon
Direct Fire Support Weapon Platoon 6 x GPMG OR 6 x Carl Gustav
84mm recoilless rifle
Reconnaissance and Surveillance Platoon
Recon Patrol (x 4)
Surveillance Detachment (x 4)
Sniper pair (x 4)
Rifle Company (x 4) [A-D Company]
Company HQ
Direct Fire Support Weapon Section 2 x GPMG OR 2 x Carl Gustav
Rifle Platoon (x 3)
Platoon HQ
Rifle Section (x3) 2 x Minimi, 2 x F89 Rifle
with grenade launcher, 2 x 66mm LAW
The organisations of the mechanised battalion and the motorised battalions differ somewhat from the light infantry battalion, but retain the same (theoretical) structure of four infantry companies and administration and support companies.
Each rifle platoon in 5/7 RAR has 4 M-113 APCs with another 2 at the company HQ, for a total of 14 per company. Every rifle section in 5/7 RAR has a Carl Gustav recoilless rifle.
Each motorised rifle company has 14 IMVs distributed in the same way, but each rifle platoon only has a single Carl Gustav.
Javelin ATGMs are to be introduced into service with the infantry battalions in the very near future. These weapons will complement the Carl Gustavs which will be retained in service alongside the Javelins.
The commando companies in 1 Commando Regiment and 4 RAR are made up of a headquarters, two commando platoons and a reconnaissance platoon and integral combat service support elements. 1 Commando Regiment’s companies each also have a training platoon.
‘Medium’ artillery batteries are equipped with 155mm towed howitzers and ‘Field’ artillery batteries are equipped with 105mm towed howitzers. The Australian Army has no self propelled artillery. A full strength artillery battery consists of 6 guns.
Australia’s M113 APC equipped units specialise in either armoured reconnaissance or armoured troop transport. A full strength cavalry/light horse squadron in the APC role is intended to provide enough ‘lift’ for a full light infantry battalion. A troop of APCs provides enough lift for a company.
In 1993 a Cavalry/Light Horse Squadron had the following structure:
Squadron HQ 9 x M113 APC
Support Troop 17 x M113 APC, 3 x TLC
Administration Troop 4 x M113 APC, 12 x TLC
Technical Support Troop 6 x M113 APC, 1 x cargo carrier,
1 x ARV
APC Troop (x 4)
Troop HQ 3 x M113 APC
APC Section (x 3) 3 x M113 APC
Totals:
APC: 84
TLC: 15
ARV: 1
9 Officers and 132 other ranks
Each of the three ‘sabre’ squadrons in 2 Cavalry Regiment and 2/14 Light Horse has the following structure:
Squadron HQ 2 x ASLAV-C, 2 x ASLAV-25
Combat Support Echelon 1 x ASLAV-25, 1 x ASLAV-R,
1 x ASLAV-F, 1 x ASLAV-8
Cavalry Troop (x 3) 4 x ASLAV-25, 2 x ASLAV-PC,
1 x Cavalry Scout Section
Additional cavalry scouts are attached to the regimental Headquarters.
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Default Oceania 2nd archive (source: Nick Dowding)

Royal Australian Air Force 2004
Nick Dowling
Air Force
Commander, Royal Australian Air Force - Chief of Air Force (CAF)
Office of CAF
WOFF of RAAF
Air Force Headquarters
Air Force Executive - DCAF Division
Chaplaincy
Policy & Planning - Air Force
Directorate of Combat Capability Management
Directorate of Battlespace Management (Aerospace)
Directorate of Capability Support
Directorate of Planning and Logistics
Resource Planning - Air Force
Directorate of Budget Management
Directorate of Investment Analysis
Directorate of Resource Analysis
Directorate of Business Improvement
Directorate Civilian People Strategies & Support
Personnel - Air Force
Directorate of Personnel Airmen
Directorate of Personnel Officers
Directorate of Personnel Reserves
Directorate of People Capability Management
Co-ordination - Air Force
Reserves-Air Force
Air Force Headquarters Agencies
Directorate of Flying Safety – Australian Defence Force (ADF)
Airworthiness Coordination & Policy Agency - ADF
Directorate General of Technical Airworthiness - ADF
Aerospace Centre
RAAF Aeronautical Information Service
Directorate of Security & Policing - Air Force
Aviation Capability Improvement Team
Headquarters Air Command
Headquarters Air Command
Doctrine and Development
Operational Support
Operations
Plans
Reporting and Financial Management
Headquarters Combat Support Group (RAAF Amberley)
Headquarters No 395 Expeditionary Combat Support Wing (RAAF Townsville)
No 381 Expeditionary Combat Support Squadron (RAAF Willamtown)
No 382 Expeditionary Combat Support Squadron (RAAF Amberley)
No 383 Expeditionary Combat Support Squadron (RAAF Amberley)
No 386 Expeditionary Combat Support Squadron (RAAF Richmond)
No 1 Air Terminal Squadron (RAAF Richmond)
No1 Air Terminal Squadron Detachment Richmond
No1 Air Terminal Squadron Detachment Amberley
No1 Air Terminal Squadron Detachment Williamtown
No1 Air Terminal Squadron Detachment Darwin
No1 Air Terminal Squadron Detachment Tindal
No1 Air Terminal Squadron Detachment Townsville
No1 Air Terminal Squadron Detachment Pearce
No 1 Combat Communications Squadron (RAAF Richmond)
No 1 Combat Logistics Squadron (RAAF Townsville)
No 1 Combat Logistics Squadron Detachment A (RAAF Tindal)
No 1 Combat Logistics Squadron Detachment B (RAAF Richmond)
Explosive Ordinance Disposal Flight (Orchard Hills)
Headquarters No 396 Combat Support Wing (RAAF Darwin)
No 321 Combat Support Squadron (RAAF Darwin)
No 323 Combat Support Squadron (RAAF Townsville)
No 324 Combat Support Squadron (Butterworth, Malaysia)
Bare Base Management Flight (DAR; LMO/CTN/SGR)
Headquarters No 322 Combat Support Wing (RAAF Tindal)
No 322 Combat Support Squadron (RAAF Tindal)
Headquarters Health Services Wing (RAAF AMB)
No 1 Air Transportable Health Squadron (RAAF AMB)
No 2 Air Transportable Health Squadron (RAAF WLM)
No 3 Combat Support Hospital (RAAF Richmond)
No 3 Air Transportable Health Flight
No 4 Air Transportable Health Flight
Operational Health Support and Training Flight
Headquarters Airfield Defence Wing (RAAF Amberley)
No 1 Airfield Defence Squadron (RAAF Edinburgh)
Communications Section (RAAF Edinburgh)
No 1 Rifle Flight (RAAF Pearce)
No 2 Rifle Flight (RAAF Edinburgh)
No 3 Rifle Flight (RAAF Williams (Laverton) )
No 4 Rifle Flight (DCSC-TAS)
Reconnaissance Section (RAAF Edinburgh)
No 2 Airfield Defence Squadron (RAAF Amberley)
No 3 Airfield Defence Squadron (RAAF Amberley)
No 5 Rifle Flight (RAAF Richmond)
No 6 Rifle Flight (RAAF Richmond)
Headquarters Combat Reserve Wing (RAAF Glenbrook)
No 13 Squadron (RAAF Darwin)
No 21 Squadron (RAAF Williams (Laverton))
No 22 Squadron (RAAF Richmond)
No 23 Squadron (RAAF Amberley)
No 24 Squadron (RAAF Edinburgh)
No 25 Squadron (RAAF Pearce)
No 26 Squadron (RAAF Williamtown)
No 27 Squadron (RAAF Townsville)
No 28 Squadron (Canberra International Airport)
No 29 Squadron (Anglesea Barracks, Hobart)
Combat Support Unit Amberley
Combat Support Unit Edinburgh
Combat Support Unit Richmond
Air Command Band (RAAF Richmond)
Combat Support Unit Williamtown
Combat Support Unit Glenbrook
Headquarters Surveillance and Response Group (RAAF Williamtown)
ADGE & Air Traffic Control Support Flight
Headquarters No 44 Wing
Air Traffic Control Flight Williamtown
Air Traffic Control Flight Amberley
Air Traffic Control Flight Oakey
Air Traffic Control Flight Townsville
Air Traffic Control Flight Tindal
Air Traffic Control Flight Darwin
Air Traffic Control Flight Pearce
Air Traffic Control Flight Edinburgh
Air Traffic Control Flight East Sale
Air Traffic Control Flight Nowra
Air Traffic Control Flight Richmond
Headquarters No 41 Wing
No 1 Radar Surveillance Unit (RAAF Edinburgh)
1 RSU Detachment Alice Springs
1 RSU Detachment Laverton
1 RSU Detachment Longreach
No 114 Mobile Control and Reporting Unit (RAAF Darwin)
No 2 Control and Reporting Unit (RAAF Tindal )
No 3 Control and Reporting Unit
Space-Based Infrared System Mission Control Station
Surveillance and Control Training Unit
Headquarters No 92 Wing (RAAF Edinburgh)
No 10 Squadron (AP-3C Orion)
No 11 Squadron (AP-3C Orion)
No 292 Squadron (3 TAP-3B Orion)
No 92 Wing Detachment A (Butterworth, Malaysia)
No 92 Wing ELINT Detachment (RAAF Amberley?) (2 EP-3 Orion)
No. 2 Squadron (6 B737 Wedgetail AEW&C on order)
Information Operations Squadron
Headquarters Air Combat Group (RAAF Williamtown)
Headquarters No 82 Wing (RAAF Amberley)
No. 1 Squadron (F-111C, 4 RF-111C)
No. 6 Squadron (F-111C, 7 F-111G)
Forward Area Control Development Unit (RAAF Williamtown) (4 PC-9/A(F))
Headquarters No 81 Wing (RAAF Williamtown)
No 3 Squadron (14 F/A-18A/B Hornet)
No 75 Squadron (RAAF Tindal) (14 F/A-18A/B Hornet)
No 77 Squadron (14 F/A-18A/B Hornet)
Headquarters No 78 Wing (RAAF Williamtown)
No 2 Operational Conversion Unit (F/A-18B Hornet)
No 76 Squadron (Hawk 127)
Training Flight
Operations Flight
No 79 Squadron (RAAF Pearce) (Hawk 127)
Training Flight
Operations Flight
Maintenance Flight
No 278 Squadron
Headquarters Air Lift Group (RAAF Richmond)
Headquarters No 84 Wing
No 32 Squadron (RAAF East Sale) (King Air 350)
No 32 Squadron Detachment Darwin
No 33 Squadron (4 Boeing 707 tanker)
No 34 Squadron (Canberra International Airport) (2 737 BBJ,
3 Challenger CL-604)
Headquarters No 85 Wing
Air Movements Training and Development Unit
No 285 Squadron
Headquarters No 86 Wing
No 36 Squadron (11 C-130H, 1 EC-130H)
No 37 Squadron (12 C-130J-30)
No 38 Squadron (RAAF Amberley) (14 DHC4 Caribou)
No 38 Squadron Detachment A (RAAF Pearce)
No 38 Squadron Detachment B (RAAF Townsville)
Aerospace Operational Support Group (Edinburgh)
Headquarters Aerospace Operational Support Group
Headquarters Aircraft Research and Development Unit
Aerospace Systems Test Squadron
Aerospace Systems Engineering Squadron
Aircraft Stores Compatibility Engineering Agency
Electronic Warfare Squadron


Headquarters Training Command (RAAF Williams (Laverton))
Air Force Training
Headquarters Air Training Wing (RAAF East Sale)
Central Flying School (PC-9/A)
Australian Defence Force Basic Flying Training School (Tamworth) (CT4-B)
No 2 Flying Training School (RAAF Pearce) (PC-9/A)
School of Air Navigation
School of Air Traffic Control
Combat Survival Training School (RAAF Townsville)
RAAF Institute of Aviation Medicine (RAAF Edinburgh)
Combat Support Unit East Sale
Headquarters Ground Training Wing (RAAF Wagga Wagga)
Defence International Training Centre (RAAF Williams (Laverton) )
Australian Defence Force School of Languages (RAAF Williams (Laverton))
RAAF School of Technical Training
RAAF School of Management and Training Technology
RAAF Security and Fire School (RAAF Amberley)
Combat Support Unit Wagga
Health Services Training Flight (RAAF Williams (Laverton))
RAAF College (RAAF Williams (Point Cook))
Officer Training School
School of Post-Graduate Studies
No 1 Recruit Training Unit (RAAF Edinburgh)
Combat Support Unit Pearce
Combat Support Unit Williams (Laverton)
Central Band (RAAF Williams (Laverton))
RAAF Museum (RAAF Williams (Point Cook))
Search and Rescue
The RAAF’s search and rescue (SAR) services are provided by the civilian company CHC Helicopters. SAR helicopter detachments are based at RAAF Bases East Sale, Pearce, Tindal and Williamtown. Two extra SAR helicopters are available for use at forward bases during exercises.
The Australian Army unit 4th Battalion, The Royal Australian Regiment (Commando) currently has the responsibility for rescuing aircrew who have ejected behind enemy lines. This unit specialises in large scale raids behind enemy lines.
Aircraft Inventory and Budgeted Flying Hours (2004-2005 Financial Year)
Aircraft Type Number in service Budgeted Flying hours 2004-2005 Notes
Combat Aircraft
F/A-18A Hornet 55 12,500 Upgraded to F/A-18C standard
F/A-18B Hornet 16 Upgraded to F/A-18D standard
F-111C Aardvark 17 3,800 Recently upgraded
RF-111C Aardvark 4 Electronic and photo reconnaissance variant
F-111G Aardvark 14 Ex-USAF. 7 active, 5 in storage,
2 being cannibalised for spares
AP-3C Orion 17 9,000
Upgraded from P-3C. Upgrade project to be completed in 2004-05 financial year
Transport Aircraft
C-130H Hercules 11 16,000
C-130J-30 Hercules 12
DHC-4 Caribou 14 5,080 Selection of replacement has been repeatedly delayed
737-700 Boeing Business Jet 2 1,200 VIP Transport, leased
Challenger 604 3 2,400 VIP Transport, leased
Beechcraft King Air 350 0(6) N/A 6 aircraft on order. Also serve as training aircraft.
Support Aircraft
Boeing 707 tanker/transport 4 1,800 Aircraft are experiencing serviceability problems and will be retired in December 2004
EP-3 Orion 2 Unknown
EC-130H 1 Unknown
Pilatus PC-9/A(F) 4 1,030
Boeing 737-700IGW Wedgetail 0(6) N/A Will enter service in 2007-2008
A330-200 tanker/transport 0(5) N/A Will enter service from 2007
Training Aircraft
Hawk 127 33 9,000 Aircraft still experiencing some teething problems. Also serve as light attack aircraft.
Pilatus PC-9/A 61 Unknown
TAP-3B Orion 2 Unknown Ex-USN P-3B. Also serve as transport aircraft
Total Aircraft Types: 18
(+3 on order) Total Aircraft: 272 (+ 17 on order) Total Flying Hours:
over 61,810


Notes
Budget and Personnel
• The RAAF’s budget for the financial year 2004-05 is $A 4.6 Billion (about $ US 3.3 Billion) see the Australian Department of Defence Portfolio Budget Statement for a detailed break-down of how this money will be spent.
• The RAAF has a strength of 13,638 full time personnel and 2,800 reservists.
• After years of often severe pilot shortfalls, the RAAF has finally been able to fully staff all its flying units.
Procurement
• Australia is a member of the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter project. At the time of writing, the Australian government is planning on purchasing up to 100 F-35s. The aircraft will replace both the F/A-18 and F-111 and the F-35 is expected to initially enter service in about 2012.
• The F/A-18 fleet has recently been upgraded
• The F-111s are scheduled for retirement in 2008. However, this may change as many experts believe that the aircraft can be made airworthy well past this date and the main opposition party, the Australian Labor Party, has promised to retain the aircraft in service.
• The RAAF is planning to buy a squadron of up to six Global Hawk UAVs.
Other
• It doesn’t appear that the RAAF operates any aircraft optimised to support special operations. While C-130Hs from 36 Squadron have supported recent Special Air Service deployments in Iraq and Afghanistan, this may be due to the C-130Js being introduced into service at the time rather then the C-130Hs being modified and trained to support special forces.
• The Boeing 707 Tankers are fitted with a probe and drogue refuelling system, and can only refuel the F/A-18s. The A-330s will be fitted with both hose and the boom systems, allowing them to refuel both F/A-18s and F-111s.
• The RAAF’s reserve squadrons are non-flying units, and serve as administrative headquarters only. RAAF reservists war role is to fill vacancies in permanent units and facilitate the rapid expansion of the Air Force.

Australian Special Operations Command 2004
Nick Dowling
Australia’s Special Operations Command is of equivalent status to Australia’s Maritime, Land and Air Commands. All its’ constituent units are drawn from the Australian Army. It is modelled on the equivalent commands in the United States and British militaries.
Special Operations Command was established in May 2003, and will be fully operational when a range of enhancement programs are completed in 2007.
Constituent Units
Special Operations Command Headquarters (Russell Offices, Canberra, ACT and Potts Point, Sydney, NSW)
Special Operations Combat Service Support Company (Banksmeadow, Sydney, NSW)
Special Air Service Regiment (Swanbourne Barracks, Perth, WA)
Regimental Headquarters
1 Squadron
Squadron HQ
A Troop
B Troop
C Troop
D Troop
2 Squadron
Squadron HQ
E Troop
F Troop
G Troop
H Troop
3 Squadron
Squadron HQ
I Troop
J Troop
K Troop
L Troop
152 Signals Squadron
Squadron HQ
1 Troop
2 Troop
3 Troop
4 Troop
Base Squadron
Training Squadron
Reinforcement Wing
Water Operations Wing
Air Wing
Climbing/Survival Wing
Demolition Wing
Vehicle Mounted Wing
1 Commando Regiment (Army Reserve) (Randwick Barracks, Sydney, NSW)
Regimental Headquarters (Randwick Barracks)
1 Commando Company (HMAS Penguin, Sydney, NSW)
2 Commando Company (Fort Gellibrand, Williamstown, Vic)
301 Signals Squadron (HQ Randwick Barracks, elements in both Sydney and Melbourne with the commando companies)
4 Battalion, The Royal Australian Regiment (Commando) (Holsworthy Barracks, Sydney, NSW)
Battalion Headquarters
A Company
B Company
C Company
Tactical Assault Group (East)
126 Signals Squadron
Operations Support Company
Logistics Support Company
Incident Response Regiment (Holsworthy Barracks, Sydney, NSW)
Regimental Headquarters
Chemical, Biological and Radiological Response Squadron
A Troop
B Troop
C Troop
High Risk Search Troop
Emergency Response Squadron (Integrated) (Sydney, Townsville, Darwin
Oakey)
1 Troop (Darwin, NT)
2 Troop
3 Troop
4 Troop (Oakey, Qld)
Scientific and Technical Organisation
Associated Units
While not formally part of the Special Operations Command, these units regularly operate with and/or support the command.
Australian Army
171 Squadron (S-70A Blackhawk) (Garbut Barracks, Townsville, Qld - moving to Sydney, NSW)
A Troop (4 S-70A Blackhawk)
B Troop (4 S-70A Blackhawk)
C Troop (4 S-70A Blackhawk)
Technical Support Troop
Administration and Logistics troop
C Squadron, 5 Aviation Regiment (6 CH-47D Chinook) (Garbut Barracks, Townsville, Qld)
Special Forces Training Centre (Singleton, NSW)
Parachute Training School (HMAS Albatross, Nowra, NSW)
Royal Australian Navy
Clearance Diving Team 1 (Sydney, NSW)
Clearance Diving Team 4 (Fleet Base West, Perth, WA)
Clearance Diving Team 3 is a non-standing formation which is activated to perform special tasks. It was most recently formed for the 2003 Iraq war with a strength of 23 divers and 3 support staff.
Both the Tactical Assault Groups include a detachment of about a dozen Clearance Divers, who operate as part of the Offshore Assault Team. The Clearance diving teams consist of a Headquarters and Support Element, a Mine Counter Measures group and a Marine Tactical Operations element (this element supports amphibious operations)
The six Collins Class Submarines HMAS Collins, Farncomb, Waller, Dechaineux, Sheean and Rankin are all equipped to embark and land a small special forces detachment in addition to their regular crew. Each submarine has spare berths sufficient for a SAS Patrol.
The Fremantle Class Patrol boats have the wartime mission of carrying and supporting special forces parties.
Royal Australian Air Force
The RAAF’s three Airfield Defence Squadrons (1, 2 and 4 Airfield Defence squadrons) are anti-special forces units, and regularly exercise with the Special Operations Command units. They are, however, not considered to be special forces themselves.
A detachment of two aircraft from 36 Squadron (C-130H) based in Sydney, NSW supported the Special Forces Task force in Iraq. There have, however, been no reports to suggest that these aircraft were specially modified for the special forces role or that they specialise in this role.
Civilian
Special Operations Command’s counter terrorism units regularly train with Australia’s civilian police forces special operations units (ie, SWAT Teams) and would closely co-operate with these units in the event of a terrorist incident. All the Australian State and Territory Police forces have such special operations units.
New Zealand
1 New Zealand Special Air Service Group (Papakura Camp, New Zealand)
Headquarters Support wing
Training wing
1 Squadron
Boat Troop
Air Troop
Mountain Troop
2 Squadron
Boat Troop
Air Troop
Mountain Troop
The New Zealand SAS frequently train with Australian units, and NZ SAS units frequently deploy as part of combined Australia-New Zealand special forces squadrons. As with the Australian SAS, elements of the New Zealand SAS’s rotate between conventional and counter-terrorism roles. New Zealand is currently in the process of establishing a unit similar to the Incident Response Regiment.
Notes
Budget and Personnel
The head of Special Operations Command is currently Brigadier Mike Hindmarsh. Major-General Duncan Lewis commanded SOC from its formation in May 2003 until October 2004.
Special Operations Command’s budget for the financial year 2003-04 is A$322 million.
The number of personnel in the Command appears to be classified. This author’s best guess is that Special Operations Command has a strength of roughly 2,500 personnel (700 in the SASR, 300 in the IRR, about 200 for each of the Commando company groups and the remainder in the SOC Command HQ and Combat Service Support Company.
As women cannot serve as commandos or SAS patrolmen, it is likely that Special Operations Command has a smaller proportion of female soldiers then is the case across the rest of the Army.
Unit Roles
The two commando battalions have the role of carrying out large scale airborne, air mobile or amphibious raids behind enemy lines. Their role is a combination of those performed by American Army’s Rangers and the British Royal Marines.
In contrast, the SASR focuses on smaller scale and more covert operations.
The Incident Response Regiment (IRR) is a defensive unit with no offensive capabilities worth mentioning. Its’ role is to detect and respond to CBR weapons and terrorist attacks. It’s somewhat unclear why this unit is part of Special Operations Command. The IRR’s personnel are not require to pass the special forces selection tests or undergo special forces training.
Recent Special Forces Expansion
The establishment of Special Operations command and expansion of its constituent units increased the size of Australia’s special forces by 330 personnel,
4 RAR began converting to the Commando role in 1996. However, as a result of disruptions caused by the East Timor deployment and manpower shortages across the Army it has only recently reached full strength and become fully qualified in the Commando role. TAG (East) became operational in September 2002.
A new squadron of 12 helicopters is to be raised to specifically support Special Operations Command. These helicopters may be operated by 171 Squadron, which is currently flying UH-1s in the operational support role in 1 Aviation Regiment (171 squadron will either be attached to 5 Aviation Regiment or be made an independent squadron when 1 Aviation Regiment’s other component squadrons convert to the new Tiger attack helicopters in the near future).
There have recently been proposals to expand the SASR to four ‘sabre’ squadrons. While these proposals do not seem to have been accepted by the government, a fourth troop has been added to 152 Signals Squadron.
SASR Organisation
The SASR’s three squadrons rotate between contingency and counter terrorism configurations. Two squadrons are maintained in the contingency role and organisation with the reminder filling the counter-terrorism role. Rotations occur every 12 months, so each squadron spends one year out of three in the CT role and configuration.
During the Sydney Olympics the proportion of CT and Contingency squadrons was reversed, with two CT squadrons being available (see appendix 6). However, since the establishment of TAG (East), 4 RAR, this expedient has not been necessary (see appendix 2).
Each of the two SAS contingency squadrons consists of a Water Troop, Air Operations Troop, Mobility Troop and Signals Troop. Each troop consists of a Troop HQ and four 5 man patrols. During emergencies, extra patrols are formed from the Troop, Squadron and Regimental HQs.
The SAS counter terrorism squadron (Tactical Assault Group West) consists of Water Troop, Land Troop, Sniper Troop and Signals Troop. The Water Troop is the Offshore Assault Team, and includes attached divers from the RAN’s Clearance Diving Teams.
Commando Organisation
Commando companies in 1 Commando Regiment and 4 RAR consist of a headquarters, two commando platoons, a reconnaissance platoon, a training platoon (the training platoon may only be present in 1 Commando Regiment) and integral combat service support elements.
It’s somewhat unclear whether 4 RAR’s Tactical Assault Group (East) is a permanent standing formation or if the commando companies rotate through this role like the SASR squadrons do. It appears that when the TAG was initially established in 2002 the companies rotated through the role, but it has since become a standing unit, with the commando companies not rotating through the role.
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Default Oceania 3rd archive (source: Nick Dowding)

New Zealand Army 2004

By Nick Dowling

Detailed Order of Battle

Army General Staff (Wellington)
Development Branch
Policy and Plans Branch
Resources Branch
Coordination Branch
Inspector General (Army)
HR Executive Branch
Logistics Executive (Trentham Camp)

Base Depot Trentham
5 Base Logistics Group

Army Training Group (Waiouru Camp)
HQ Army Training Group
Land Operations Training Centre
Combat School
School of Artillery, 16 Field Regiment
Logistics Operations School
School of Tactics
School of Signals
Trade Training School
School of Military Intelligence and Security
Joint Catering School
School of Military Engineering, 2 Engineer Regiment
Officer Cadet School
The Army Depot
New Zealand Army Marae
New Zealand Army Band
NZLAV Transition Training Team
New Zealand Army Simulation Centre (Linton Camp)
Waiouru Support Centre

Land Component Commander (HQ NZDF, Trentham Camp)

Force Troops
1 New Zealand SAS Group (Papakura Camp)
Headquarters support wing
Training wing
1 Squadron
Boat Troop
Air Troop
Mountain Troop
2 Squadron
Boat Troop
Air Troop
Mountain Troop
Force Military Police Company (Trentham Camp)

2 Land Force Group (Linton Camp)
HQ 2 Land Force Group
Queen Alexandra’s Squadron (M-113 APC) (Waiouru Camp)
1 Battalion, The Royal New Zealand Infantry Regiment
3 Auckland (Countess of Ranfurly's Own) and Northland Battalion Group (Territorial Force) (Auckland Army Centre)
Ranfurly Company [rifle company]
11/4 Battery
1 Signals Squadron
1 Logistics Company
1 Health Company
Recruit Company
Civil Affairs Company
5 Wellington West Coast and Taranaki Battalion Group (Territorial Force) (Wanganui)
6 Hauraki Battalion Group (Territorial Force) (Tauranga)
7 Wellington (City of Wellington's Own) and Hawke's Bay Battalion Group (Territorial Force) (Napier)
16 Field Regiment
HQ Battery
161 Battery (6 105mm Light Gun)
163 Battery (6 105mm Light Gun)
43 Air Defence Battery (Light) (12 Mistral SAM)
16 Field Regiment Workshops
2 Engineer Regiment (-)
HQ Squadron
2 Field Squadron
25 Engineer Support Squadron
2 Signals Squadron
Force Intelligence Group (Trentham Camp)
2 Logistics Battalion
10 Transport Company
2 Workshop Company
21 Supply Company
IEDD/EOD Team(s?)
2 Health Services Battalion (-)
Operational Welfare Unit
2 MP Platoon


3 Land Force Group (Burnham Camp)
HQ 3 Land Force Group
2/1 Battalion, The Royal New Zealand Infantry Regiment
2 Canterbury, and Nelson-Marlborough, and West Coast Battalion Group (Territorial Force) (Christchurch)
4 Otago and Southland Battalion Group (Territorial Force) (Dunedin)
3 Field Troop, 2 Engineer Regiment
3 Signals Squadron
3 Logistics Battalion
Medical Treatment Centre, 2 Health Support Battalion
3 MP Platoon
Training units attached to 3 Land Force Group:
Army Adventure Training Centre
3 Regional Training Unit
Health Services School, 2 Health Support Battalion


Major Equipment:
(from Asia-Pacific Defence Reporter 2002-2003 Source book and Rolfe (1999))
APC:
72 M113 (inc variants. To be retired in the near future)
105 LAV III on order (102 LAVs and 3 recovery vehicles. Deliveries began in November 2003 and will finish November 2004. These vehicles are called NZLAVs in NZ service)
Artillery: 24 105mm L118 Light Guns
ATGW: 24 Javelin on order (will all be in service by the end of 2006)
RCL: 63 84mm Carl Gustav
Mortar: 50 81mm
SAM: 12 Mistral (to be upgraded and made fully operational)

Notes:

The New Zealand Army has a personnel strength of 4423 regulars, 1975 reservists and 646 civilians (7044 total). 14% of the Army’s personnel are female.
By 2005 all positions in the New Zealand Army, including infantry, will be open to female soldiers.
The New Zealand Army’s budget for the financial year 2004-2005 is $NZ 560 Million ($US 357 Million).
The Territorial Force (TF) is the reserve component of the New Zealand Army. On mobilisation, the TF units will provide reinforcements and individual replacements to the two regular battalions and combine to form a third battalion, 3/1 RNZIR. The six TF battalions are meant to be able to each field at least one rifle company. On mobilisation, each of the regular battalions will receive a TF company, with the remaining four companies combining to form 3/1 RNZIR.
In the very unlikely event of full mobilisation and simultaneous deployment, the three RNZIR battalions and other army elements will combine into a Brigade Group. This brigade group exists in peacetime as a purely ‘paper’ formation with the designation of 7 Brigade. HQ 7 Brigade would be drawn from HQ 2 Land Force Group, which plays the role of HQ 7 Brigade during large-scale exercises.
New Zealand is planning to establish a dedicated counter Improvised Explosive Device and Chemical and Biological Weapons organisation which will be made up of personnel drawn from all three services and operate under Army command. This unit will be very similar Australia’s Incident Response Regiment. This capacity is currently being filled by three joint IED/CB teams (one each at Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch) which are under Army command. These units are not included in the above OOB as I cannot find detailed information on them.
Tactical air transport for the New Zealand Army is provided by the 14 UH-1 Iroquois helicopters operated by the Utility Flight of the Royal New Zealand Air Force’s 3 Squadron. 6 aircraft are maintained on high readiness to support deployed Army units.
Deliveries of New Zealand’s 105 LAV III’s are now underway, and will be completed by November 2004. These LAVs will be sufficient to motorise two battalions (a fully equipped battalion group will have a total of 51 LAVs, with each rifle company group being mounted in 14 LAVs).
The NZ Defence Minister has announced that the LAVs are to be allocated between the Army’s units as follows:
Fifty to 1 RNZIR at Linton Camp
Forty to 2/1 RNZIR at Burnham Camp
Ten to the Army Training Group at Waiouru Camp
Five to the Trade Training School at Trentham Camp
The first LAVs have now been delivered to 1 RNZIR, which was in the process of converting to the vehicles at the time of writing. The first LAV III Platoon will complete their crew training on 25 June 2004, the first LAV III mounted company will be available from December 2004 and 1 RNZIR will be ready for overseas deployment with the vehicles by December 2005.
A full strength New Zealand infantry battalion consists of:
headquarters
three infantry companies
combat support elements
reconnaissance company
The exact names of the Territorial Force units are somewhat unclear. The Army’s official website has this less then clear explanation of the naming convention currently in use: “The six TF regiments are known formally as battalion groups (recognising historical links and relevance) however for ease of communication are referred to as regiments”. Army websites appear to interchangeably refer to these units as numbered battalion groups and as non-numbered regiments. For example, the Auckland (Countess of Ranfurly's Own) and Northland Regiment is called by both this name and by just ‘3rd Battalion Group’ on it’s home site, and an army news article refers to the ‘4th Otago and Southland Battalion Group’.
I’ve chosen to use the apparently formal designation of ‘battalion group’. Readers who can shed more light on this issue are encouraged to contact the author at: nick_dowling@hotmail.com
The organisation of the Territorial Force Battalion Groups/Regiments differs from unit to unit. At minimum, each Battalion Group/Regiment consists of a headquarters, a recruit induction training company, at least one rifle company, and a number of combat support/combat service support companies or platoons.

For example, the website of the Auckland (Countess of Ranfurly's Own) and Northland Battalion Group/Regiment (www.aucknortharmy.mil.nz/index.htm) provides a very complete order of battle for this unit:

3 Auckland (Countess of Ranfurly's Own) and Northland Battalion Group
HQ
Ranfurly Company
1 Rifle Platoon
2 Rifle Platoon
3 Rifle Platoon
11/4 Battery
A Troop
G Troop
1 Signals Squadron
11 Signals Troop
12 CIS Trop
Engineer Troop
1 Logistics Company
Transport Platoon
QT Platoon
EME Platoon
1 Health Company
Recruit Company
1 Platoon
2 Platoon
3 Platoon
Civil Affairs Company
Training Wing
Band
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Default Oceania 4th archive (source: Nick Dowding)

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Default Oceania 4th archive (source: Nick Dowding)

Fiji Army 2004
(incomplete)
Nick Dowling
Army Headquarters (Suva)
Special Operations Company(???)
Engineer Battalion
1 Battalion, The Fiji Infantry Regiment
2 Battalion, The Fiji Infantry Regiment (Northern Sector, Sinai)
3 Battalion, The Fiji Infantry Regiment
4 Battalion, The Fiji Infantry Regiment (Territorial Reservists)
5 Battalion, The Fiji Infantry Regiment (Territorial Reservists)
6 Battalion, The Fiji Infantry Regiment (Territorial Reservists)
7 Battalion, The Fiji Infantry Regiment (Territorial Reservists)
8/9 Battalion, The Fiji Infantry Regiment (Territorial Reservists)

Fiji Army
Leigh Ingram-Seal
2002 had 3 200 regular army personnel
Organised in Fijian Infantry Regiment [ F.I.R.]
= 3 regular Light Infantry Battalions [ called Regiments ]
[ 2 deployed overseas with United Nations ]
organised in
3 Rifle Infantry Companies
1 Administration Company
1 Logistics Company
1st Battalion , F.I.R., based UN Lebanon since 1978
established in 1978 as regular unit
raised in 1950 for service in Malaya
in 2004 normally has 500 to 700 personnel
including 120 to 150 territorial troops
remainder are regulars

2nd Battalion, F.I.R. , based MFO Sinai since 1982
established in 1982 as regular unit
understrength ,with 340 personnel
in 1 Headquarters Company
1 Support Company
3 Rifle [ Infantry ] Companies
3rd Battalion , F.I.R.,
raised in 1942 , demobilised in 1945
in 1982 re established as territorial unit
established in 1987 as regular unit
based at Queen Elizabeth Barracks
as Suva Command Battalion
with 700 personnel ,reserve unit
largest peacetime regular Battalion
comprise 4 Rifle Companies
1 Support Company
1 Logistics Company
Battalion Headquarters Company
= 3 nominal Territorial Infantry Battalions
maintained at 1 regular company strength ,cadre
each capable of deploying 1 Platoon
at Nadi ,Edinburgh Barracks
4th Battalion, F.I.R.
established in 1987
with 1 regular Infantry Company
Lautoka
5th Battalion, F.I.R.
Established in 1988
With 1 regular Infantry Company
Nausori
Labasa , Sukanaivula Barracks
7th/8th Battalion , F.I.R.
with 1 Regular Infantry Company
6th Battalion F.I.R. [ established in 1991 ]
7th Battalion F.I.R. [ established in 1995 ]
8th Battalion F.I.R. [ established in 1999 ]
= Engineer Regiment [ R.D.E.U. ] .
with 500 personnel
bulk based in Suva
Headquarters at Nabuni , Queen Elizabeth Barracks
With Support Squadron
Trade Training School
Established in 1974
Has 85 personnel
doing 12 months training course
2 Engineer Construction Squadrons
Search & Explosives Ordnance Demolition Team
[ E.O.D. ]
Assault Pioneer Platoon
Of 1 regular Engineer Company [ Squadron ]
With at least 55 personnel
Rural Development Squadron
With 250 personnel
used on civic aid duties ,construction
in rural areas
= Special Operations [ Zulu ] Company
with120 personnel
part of 3rd Infantry Battalion
Small elite special forces ,quick reaction unit
Based at Nabua Barracks
= Officer Training School [ O.T.S.]
established in 1990
based at Vatuwaga
= Force Training Group [ F.T.G.]
annual intake of 100 recruits/ trainees
based at Nasinu [ since 1987
formerly known as R.F.M.F. School
Established in April 1971
Under command of a Captain
in 1978 renamed 1 F.I.R. Depot Training Centre
In 1987 renamed Army Training Group [ A.T.G. ]
= Field Maintenance Workshop [ F.M.W.]
= Logistic Support Unit [ L.S.U.]
with at least 55 personnel
formerly known as RFMF Headquarters Company
and a company sized unit
in 1987 expanded to Battalion strength and renamed
organised in 7 units
Ordnance Company
Medical Company
Operates Military Hospital
Transport Company
Supply Company
Catering Company
Maintenance Company
Defense Platoon
= Headquarters Land Force Command
with at least 55 personnel
= Maintenance Unit
= 1 Ceremonial Artillery Troop [ Saluting Battery ]
= Military Intelligence
semi autonomous, internal security role
= Military Police Corps
= R.F.M.F. Medical Centre
= R.F.M.F. Band
established in 1918 as regular unit
Platoon sized unit [ around 30 personnel ? ]
= Counter Revolutionary Warfare Unit [ C.R.W. ]
[ 1st Meridian Squadron ]
small elite independent special forces unit
with 60 personnel , personal loyalty to Colonel Raubuka
based at Nabusa Barracks
armed with 9mm Uzi SMG
5.56mm Galil rifles
NB: involved in May 2000 coup
November 2000 Mutiny
Disbanded in 2000
equiped with
[ 4 ] 25 Pounder Field Guns
[ ceremonial saluting role ]
[ 10 to 12 ] 81mm mortars
[ 1100+ ] 5.56mm M-16 rifles
[ standard infantry weapon ]
7.62mm FN FAL rifles
5.56mm Daewoo K 2 rifles [ M-16 copy ]
[ some ] AK-47 rifles
[ some ] 5.56mm Galil rifles
[ some ] .303 Lee Enfield rifles
7.62mm M60 Machine guns
5.56mm Ultimax-100 light machine guns
[ 103 ] US 40mm grenade launchers

[ some ] 9mm Uzi SMG
9mm H & K MP 5 SMG
.45 M1911 pistols
[ some ] Greener shotguns
[ 53 ] French Trucks
LandRovers

Papua New Guinea
Leigh Ingram-Seal
Australian Military Personnel
In 1975 had 490 officers/ specialised NCOs aiding PNGDF
Including Army units
1 Field Engineering Survey Squadron
1 Recce Squadron
1 Squadron Workshop
1979 had 140 military personnel
1988 had 30 military personnel ,
mostly in the PNGDF Air Transport Squadron
2004 had 38 military personnel in training role
Local security forces
= “P.N.G. Department of Defence”
based at Port Moresby [ Murray Barracks ]
200 personnel
Includes
Defense Intelligence Branch [ D.I.B. ]
Organised into
Directorate of Strategic Defense Intelligence
[ civilian personnel
[ responsible for strategic assessment
Directorate of Military Intelligence
[ military personnel
[ supports PNGDF

=” Papua New Guinea Defence Force” [P.N.G.D.F.]
established in 1973
poorly trained badly equiped with low morale and ageing personnel
regular volunteer., poorly disciplined , ineffective
under command of a Brigadier
with 6 Colonels
21 Lieutenant-Colonels
88 Majors
authorised strength of 5 200 military personnel
including 375 officers
250 trainees
in 2000 had 4 300 regular military personnel
P.N.G.D.F. Headquarters in Port Moresby [ Murray barracks ]
With 200 military personnel [ 180 Land,
20 Maritime ]
Infantry Brigade sized HQ staff
Operate 6 major bases
At Port Moresby [ 3 ]
= Murray Barracks
= Taurama Barracks
= Goldie River Training Depot [ built in 1965 ]
Wewak [ Maem Barracks]
Lae [ Igam Barracks ]
Lombrum [ Manus Island ] opened in 1951
With 160 vehicles [ 110 transport and 50 support vehicles ]
13 sea going vessels
9 aircraft
= “P.N.G.D.F. Land Force”
in 2002 had authorised strength of 3 800 military personnel
including 1 900 combat troops]
organised in
= 2 regular Infantry Battalions [ 1R.P.I.R., and 2 R.P.I.R.]
each had a authorised strength of 750 military personnel
each made up of
3 Rifle [ Infantry] Companies
with 110 to 120 strong
each company supposed to have 6 to 7 light machine
guns
but normally only 2 to 3 light machine guns available
with 3 Platoons
1 Support Company
1 Administration Company
including
1 Medical Platoon [ with 30 personnel ]
Pioneer Platoon
Supply Platoon
Signals Platoon/Squadron
Band
1 Reconnaissance Platoon
[ with 30 personnel
[ capable special forces trained
[ better armed and equiped than normal ]
NB: 1 Royal Pacific Islands Regiment [ 1.R.P.I.R.]
Had a actual strength of 430 in 1995
Based at Port Moresby [ Taurama Barracks ]
With 1 Infantry Company deployed at Kiunga from 1983 onwards
2 Royal Pacific Islands Regiment [ 2 R.P.I.R. ]
had a actual strength of 620 in 1995
based at Wewak
with 1 Rifle Company based at Vanimo
with 150 troops in 2002
plus 1 helicopter

= 1 Engineer Battalion
formed in 1976 from existing Engineer Company
[ established in 1973 ]
authorised strength of 540 military personnel
actual strength of 440 in 1995
based at Lae [ Igam Barracks ]
used for civic aid and construction duties
NB; can deploy 1 company as infantry
with 1 Combat Engineer Company
1 Engineer Construction Company
1 Engineer Support Company
=1 Signals Squadron
based at Port Moresby
with units at Manus Island
Lae
Port Moresby
Wewak
authorised strength of 170 military personnel
actual strength of 140 personnel in 1995
=1 Special Operations Company
proposed ?
= 1 Transport Company
with 100 military personnel
with 5 Transport Platoons
based at Lae
Wewak
Port Moresby [ at all 3 bases ]
= Workshop unit
Operate general engineering workshops
At Lae
Wewak
Port Moresby
with 90 military personnel
= Movement Unit
with 30 military personnel
= Training Depot
Based at Port Moresby [ Goldie River ]
with 130 military personnel
150 recruits on 22 week training cycle
= Trade Training Unit
Specialised technical training role
Authorised strength of 50 military personnel
Actual strength of 20 personnel in 1995
= Military Police Provost Unit
Authorised strength of 120 military personnel
Actual strength of 60 in 1995
= Defence Health Centre [ Medical ]unit
with 60 military personnel
= Preventive Medical Platoon
with 20 military personnel
= Defence Academy
with 60 military personnel
Based at Lae [ Igam Barracks ]
Formerly known as Military Cadet School [ M.C.S. ]
Established in 1968
For junior officer training
In 1974 replaced by “Joint Services College”
1974 until 1988 renamed
Armouries at Taurama Barracks
Murray Barracks
Igam Barracks
Moem Barracks
Port Moresby Bulk Weapons Store
Supply Company
Ammunition Stores Depot
Equiped with
[ 5 ] Shorland S.55 Armoured vehicles
Landrovers
[ 3 ] 120mm mortars
[ 14 ] 81mm mortars [ 7 mortars with each Infantry Battalion
infantry weapons ,
7.62mm SLR LIAI rifles
7.62mm H & K G 3 rifles
[ 450+ ] 5.56mm M-16 rifles [ standard infantry weapon ]
[ 100 ] 5.56mm SR 88 rifles
[ 10 to 12 ] 5.56mm AUG Steyr rifles
[ 36 ] 5.56mm SA 80 rifles
[ 15 ] 5.56mm SA 80 light machine guns
[ 300 to 400 ] 5.56mm Ultimax-100 light machine guns
[ 18+ ] 7.62mm M 60 machine guns
FN MAG 58 machine guns
[ small number ] 5.56mm FN Minimi machine guns
[ small number ] FAMAS G 1 rifles
9mm Sterling SMG [ no longer in service ]
no artillery
=” P.N.G.D.F. Maritime Element”
established in 1974 November
authorised strength was 600 military personnel
in 2002 had 400 military personnel
Headquarters at Port Moresby
Bases at Port Moresby
[ Slipway, 20 military personnel based there
Manus Island
[ 20 military personnel based there ]
Minor Forward bases at Alotau
And Keita
Organised into
= Patrol Boat Squadron [ formed in 1975 ]
with 4 Patrol Boats ,
total 100 military personnel
based at Manus
with1 Patrol Boat based
at Port Moresby
Manus
Keita
Alotau
= Landing Craft Squadron [ formed in 1975 ]
with 2 Heavy Landing Craft LCH
1 Tug
total 30 military personnel]’
based at Port Moresby
= Signals Squadron
with 20 military personnel
= Explosive Ordnance Disposal Unit [ E.O. D.]
with 10 military personnel
= Small Boat Team
with 10 military personnel
capable special forces type unit, better armed
river reconnaissance and surveillance role
equiped with
[ 4 ] Pacific Forum class armed Patrol Boats [ AS1315 ]
“Tarangau” acquired new in 1987
‘”Dreger” acquired new in 1987
“Seeadler” acquired new in 1988
“Basilisk ‘ acquired new in 1989
length 32 meters ,103ft.,
weight 162 tons
armed with [ 1 ] 20mm cannon
[ 2 ] 12.7mm machine guns
each with 3 officers
& 14 enlisted crew
[ 3 ] Vosper class armed small Patrol craft
“Aitape”
“Samaria”
“Ladava”
all acquired in 1997, ex Singapore Navy
built in 1971
each with 19 crew,
length 33 meter,109ft,
weight 142 ton
armed with [ 1 ] 40mm gun
[ 1 ] 20mm cannon
[ 2 ] 12.7mm machine guns

[ 2 ] Balikpapan class armed Heavy Landing Craft [ L.C.H ]
“Buna’”,
“Salamaua”
acquired in 1974 November at independence
built in 1973, ex Australian Navy
weight 503 tons fully loaded ,
length 44 meters, 146ft long
armed with [ 2 ] 12.7mm/ 0.50 machine guns
each with 2 officers
& 11 enlisted crew
[ 1 ] Small Harbour Tug Boat
built in 1969 ex Australian navy,
acquired in 1975 by PNG
weight 48 tons , 50 feet long ,
with 3 to 4 crew ]
[ 6 ] small boats
=” P.N.G.D.F. Air Transport Squadron” [ A.T. S.]
established in 1974
based at Port Moresby [ since 1992 ,International airport ]
in 1988 had 80 military personnel
in 1995 had 120 military personnel
authorised strength was 190 military personnel
2002 had 200 military personnel
organised into 2 Transport Flights
A Flight [ equiped with Nomad aircraft]
B Flight [ equiped with Arava aircraft ]
equiped with
[ 3 ] IAI Arava light transport aircraft
[ 4 to 6 ] GAF Nomad light transport aircraft
[ 2 ] CASA CN235 transport aircraft
[ 1 ] Beech King Air VIP transport aircraft
[ 4 to 6 ] Bell UH-1 Iroquois helicopters

Papua New Guinea Defence Force
Nick Dowling
Headquarters PNGDF (Murray Barracks, Port Moresby)
Headquarters Land Element (Port Moresby)
1st Battalion, The Royal Pacific Islands Regiment (Taurama Barracks, Port Moresby)
2nd Battalion, The Royal Pacific Islands Regiment (Moem Barracks, Wewak)
PNGDF Engineer Battalion (Igam Barracks, Lae)
Combat Engineer Company
Construction Engineer Company
Engineer Support Company
PNGDF Signals Squadron
Explosive Ordinance Demolition Unit
Small Boat Teams
Headquarters Naval Element (Port Moresby)
Patrol Boat Squadron (Patrol Boat Base, Lombrum (on Manus Island) and Alotu, (in Milne Bay))
Pacific Forum Class patrol boats Tarangau, Dreger, Seeadler, Basilisk
Vosper Type patrol boats Aitape, Samaria, Ladava
Landing Craft Squadron (Landing Craft Base, Port Moresby)
Balikpapan class landing craft heavy Salamaua, Buna
4 generic small landing craft
2 small boats(?)
1 tug boat
Headquarters Air Element (Port Moresby)
Air Transport Squadron (Jackson’s Airport, Port Moresby)
Rotary Wing Element (4 UH-1H Iroquois)
Fixed Wing Element (2 CN235, 3 RV201)
Headquarters Support Element
Provost Company
Transport Company
Preventative Medical Platoon
General Engineering Workshop, Port Moresby
General Engineering Workshop, Wewak
Training Facilities
Recruit Training Depot (Goldie River Training Depot, Port Moresby)
Defence Academy (Igam Barracks, Lae)


Notes
• The Papua New Guinea Defence Force is currently in very poor condition. Its finances are in a mess, equipment serviceability is extremely low, most of its units are undermanned and, not surprisingly, morale and discipline is generally poor. To make matters worse, the PNGDF’s structure no longer meets PNGs needs, and requires streamlining – something which is being delayed by fears that personnel made redundant will mutiny.
• The Land Element is structured as an under strength brigade group. While raising a third infantry battalion has been repeatedly proposed, this has always been judged to be unaffordable.
• Each of the two infantry battalions has an authorised strength of 747 personnel. The battalions consist of:
Battalion Headquarters
Rifle Company (x 3) (authorised for 4 companies, but only 3 raised)
Support Company
Reconnaissance Platoon
Mortar Platoon (81mm mortars)
Pioneer Platoon
Signals Platoon
Administration Company
Medical Platoon
Band Platoon
Transport Platoon?
Quartermaster Platoon?
Catering Platoon?
The engineer battalion has an authorised strength of 534 personnel
As of 1996, the PNGDF had 163 vehicles, comprising 108 transport vehicles and 55 support vehicles (graders, dump trucks, etc). Serviceability was very low however, and it wasn’t uncommon for the transport company to not have any vehicles in working condition.

Last edited by Mohoender; 01-14-2009 at 10:33 PM.
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Default Oceania 5th archive (source: Nick Dowding)

Tongan Defence Services [ T.D.S. ]
Leigh Ingram-Seal
= Ministry of Police
includes Police Department
Prison Department
Fire Service
Tonga Defence Services
= Tonga Defense Services [ T.D.S. ]
re- established in June 1954 as regular home defence force
with New Zealand supplied equipment and support
under command of New Zealand Army officers from 1954 until 1977
reorganised in the 1970s
renamed in 1974 as Tonga Defence Services
under command of a Lieutenant-Colonel
small regular unified long established volunteer locally recruited
Internal security , public order ,civil defence, and riot control role
Basic infantry & riot control training
With volunteers recruited on 18 month to 2 years service
Regular officers & NCOs trained in New Zealand
Regarded as loyal to King , well trained & professional
Defence budget $ 2 million in 1990/1991
$1.76 million in 1989/1990
largest Tongan government department budget
NB: Tonga is regarded as the most militarised state in the Pacific due
to the number of military/paramilitary personnel available
Main Headquarters and Command elements
Based at Vilai Barracks in Nukualofo
Recruit Basic Training Intake normally has 28 recruits
In 2000 had 430 regular military personnel
[ including women
at least 18 officers ]
plus trained reserves
Tonga Police
2002 had joint Headquarters for TDS
organised in 3 Operational Commands
= Royal Marines/Land Force
= Royal Guards
= Maritime Force
and 2 Support Elements
= Training Group
= Support & Logistics Group
with at least 52 personnel
includes
= Land Force [ Army ]
under Command of a Major
Land Forces Headquarters at Taliai Military Camp
[ training facility , built in 1953
next to Fuaamoto International Airport
main military barracks for TDS
base for Land Force elements
Air Wing
Barracks at Neiafu Town [ in Vavau Island group ]
re established in 1953 with 50 soldiers
to be 1 Infantry Company in size
in 2002 had 260 regular military personnel
plus 1 000 reserves
equiped with British light infantry weapons only ,
khaki uniforms
TDS Armoury includes 25 modern US military rifles
Based near airport
includes
.303 Lee Enfield Mark IV rifles [ regarded to be in good condition ]
Bren light machine guns [ World War 2 era , ancient ]
.38 Webley revolvers
9mm Sterling Sub machine guns
7.62mm FN FNL rifles [ standard infantry weapon , aging
[ couple ] Vickers heavy machine guns [ World War2 era , non operational ? ]
.50 calibre Browning M2 machine guns
NB tried to acquire [ 300 ] US 5.56mm M-16 rifles
Saluting Battery [ 4 ] old cannons [ acquired in 1945 ]
Still active in 1965
Comprise mostly light infantry with basic infantry
and riot control training
When mobilised form Battalion strength
Organised in 3 units
1 unit recruited from eastern half of main island
1 unit recruited from western half of main island
1 unit recruited from smaller islands
all units stationed in area where they are not recruited from
In 2002 organised
in 1 Headquarters Platoon
1 Light Infantry Company
[ field unit , 100+ personnel ]
[ able to deploy 1 full Infantry Platoon [ with 40 personnel
Rural Development Unit [ R.D.U. ]
Construction unit/army engineers
With 45 personnel
TDS Band [ Royal Corps of Musicians ]
Deployed 40 personnel to Solomon islands 6 months in 2004
44 personnel to Iraq in 2004
organised in 1 Combat Platoon
with 3 Rifle Sections [ each of 10 men ]
1 Support Section [ of 6 men ]
= Territorial Force
TDS/army reserve ,part time personnel
Under direct control of TDS Headquarters
= Active Reserve
TDS reserve
Under direct control of TDS Headquarters
NB ; total reserves in 1983 were 1 000 trained personnel
=T.D.S. Administration and Technical Support Unit
=”T.D.S. Air Wing”
established in 1986
based at Taliai Military Camp
has [ 1 ] Victa Airtourer small training aircraft
[ acquired in 1986 ]
[ 1 ] Beech 18 maritime patrol aircraft
[ acquired in 1996 ]
=”Royal Tonga Navy”
formerly known as “T.D.S. Maritime Division”
Velata Naval Base at Pangai [at Lifuka island [ Haapai Group ]
Touliki Naval Base at Nukualofa [ Tongatapu island ]
responsible for fishery patrol , anti smuggling , rescue
coastal naval role
Include Hydrographic Unit at Touliki Naval base
In 2002 had 130 military personnel
Including 18 officers
78 enlisted personnel
plus Royal Tongan Marines
Equiped with
3 Pacific Forum class armed Patrol Boats
“Neiafu’” acquired new in 1989
“Pangai” acquired new in 1990
“Savea” acquired new in 1991
[ each had 17 crew,
weight 162 tons
length ,32 metres, or 103ft
[ armed with [ 2 ] 7.62mm machine guns ]
[ each with 4 officers
& 9 enlisted crew
1 Royal Yacht “Titilupe”
[ 10 tons in weight ,
10 meters in length ]
1 Landing Craft [ LCM-8 , “HMAV Late” ]
[ acquired in 1982 ,
weight 116 tons, ex Australian Army
[ 22 meters long ,
with 5 crew ]
6 Launches
= “Royal Tongan Marines”
part of the Maritime Division
in 2000 had 50 personnel
including 4 officers
46 enlisted personnel
= “Tongan Royal Guards Regiment”
uniformed, armed , guard Royal Palace and King in Nukuoalafa
provide security for King , Royal palaces , Royal family
carefully selected elite
under command of a Captain
part of the armed forces
long established with red and white coloured uniforms
active since at least 1899
in 1920s to 1930s was made up of part time military personnel
pre World War 2 were the only local territorial military force available
armed with rifles
based at Vilai Barracks at Nukualofo
in 2000 had 100 military personnel [ 200 personnel ? ]
=”Tonga Police Department “
paramilitary role, part of Armed Forces T.D.S.
normally unarmed but capable of a paramilitary role
untrained or partially trained
batons held in reserve
majority of police are based on Tongapatu island
Police Headquarters at Nukualofa
under command of a Superintendent
Has tear gas and guns available in case of civil unrest
Included Police women since 1942
Organised in 3 Police Territorial Divisions
Equiped with Toyota 4 wheel drive vehicles
Motorcycles
In 2000 had 420 police personnel
including women
includes
Police Band
[ with 20 personnel in white uniforms
active since at least 1960s ]
Police Training Centre
[ opened in 1968

Security Department
[ internal security role ]
Police Stations at
Pongai [ at Lifuka island [ Haapai group ]
Hihifo [ at Niuatoputopu island [ Niuas group ]
Neifu town [ in Vavau island [ Vavau group ]
Nukualofa [ in Tongatapu island group
NB; 10 Police personnel sent to Solomons Islands in Sept. 2003
Including 1 Officer
1 Sergeant
8 Constables [ including 1 woman ]
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  #8  
Old 09-04-2018, 11:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mohoender View Post
The Fremantle Class Patrol boats have the wartime mission of carrying and supporting special forces parties.

HMAS Tobruk
HMAS Kanimbla
HMAS Manoora
Hey where is HMAS Hammersley?
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Old 09-04-2018, 08:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rcaf_777 View Post
Hey where is HMAS Hammersley?
I REALLY hope you're joking!?
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Old 09-04-2018, 09:59 PM
Olefin Olefin is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Legbreaker View Post
I REALLY hope you're joking!?
FYI for those who dont know Sea Patrol is an Australian television drama that ran from 2007 to 2011, set on board HMAS Hammersley.
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  #11  
Old 09-05-2018, 01:43 AM
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StainlessSteelCynic StainlessSteelCynic is offline
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And it's worth pointing out that the following RAN vessels are not patrol boats,
HMAS Tobruk (L50) - Landing Ship Heavy
HMAS Kanimbla (L51) - Landing Platform Amphibious
HMAS Manoora (L52) - Landing Platform Amphibious

The fictional HMAS Hammersly was portrayed by a Fremantle Class boat in the first season only. From the second season it was portrayed by an Armidale Class boat. This was due to the Fremantle Class being decommissioned and replaced by the Armidale Class from 2005 to 2007.
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Old 09-05-2018, 02:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Olefin View Post
FYI for those who dont know Sea Patrol is an Australian television drama that ran from 2007 to 2011, set on board HMAS Hammersley.
And even more (in)famously we happen to have a rather, ah, "mentally challenged" Greens Senator who honestly believes it was a documentary, and not a work of total fiction.
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  #13  
Old 09-05-2018, 05:15 AM
dragoon500ly dragoon500ly is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Legbreaker View Post
And even more (in)famously we happen to have a rather, ah, "mentally challenged" Greens Senator who honestly believes it was a documentary, and not a work of total fiction.
This doesn't surprise me...
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