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  #31  
Old 06-22-2010, 10:19 PM
RN7 RN7 is offline
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I want to retract my previous statement about Republic of Ireland troops-

" Most recruits to the Irish Army have either the wrong temperment to be employed at anything else or see it as a career move to a fairly comfortable government job. Many married soldiers go home to their families after work, at least for part of the week, and it was recently highlighted in the Irish media that many Irish soldiers are well over 30 and out of shape. Many also volunteer for UN peacekeeping duties because they get a big pay rise for doing so".

-after reading this article about them serving on UN duty in the Congo during the 1960's.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siege_of_Jadotville

150 Irish soldiers in the middle of Africa cut off from other UN forces with no hope of relief, and with little heavy weaponry and shortages of ammunition and supplies, manage to hold out against a force of up to 5,000 enemy native soldiers led by European mercenaries for six days until they ran out of ammunition and supplies, and kill at least 300 and wound up to 1,000 with no casualties to themsleves other than a half a dozen wounded.

I believe there is going to be a film about it. The UN should have sent the Irish to Bosnia or Rwanda!
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  #32  
Old 06-22-2010, 10:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RN7 View Post
150 Irish soldiers in the middle of Africa cut off from other UN forces with no hope of relief, and with little heavy weaponry and shortages of ammunition and supplies, manage to hold out against a force of up to 5,000 enemy native soldiers led by European mercenaries for six days until they ran out of ammunition and supplies, and kill at least 300 and wound up to 1,000 with no casualties to themsleves other than a half a dozen wounded.

I believe there is going to be a film about it. The UN should have sent the Irish to Bosnia or Rwanda!
Someone told the Irish that the enemy was coming to cut down all the trees in Ireland again and that Cromwell was leading them.

Webstral
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  #33  
Old 06-24-2010, 04:45 AM
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I don't see why the British Army would even care about Northern Ireland. I mean with Warsaw Pact and all wouldn't they be the least of their probelms?
I mean I could see leaving a very small force there for homeland defense against a possible foreign enemy, but with WW3 why not let law enforcement handle the civilains, and let the troops fight the reds. Why not just leave Northern Ireland to it's own devices? I mean the IRA would be cutting it's own balls off by attacking British troops. They know if the British lost, the Soviets aren't gonna be nice to them, or leave them alone in Northern Ireland. I just think the U.K. would have more important things to do then give up able bodied troops to play policeman. I like the story though. I'm not from the U.K., so it's not that in my face. I don't even understand what the whole thing is about and what group stands for what and who is fighting who. My education on the IRA is from Hollywood.
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  #34  
Old 06-24-2010, 08:26 AM
Ironside Ironside is offline
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It has been said that when anyone comes close to solving the 'Irish Question', the Irish change the question
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  #35  
Old 06-24-2010, 09:47 AM
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I believe there is going to be a film about it. The UN should have sent the Irish to Bosnia or Rwanda!
They weren't in Rwanda, but the Irish did have a contingent in Bosnia, and are still in Kosovo, as well as supporting a host of other UN operations

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irish_A...tions_Missions

On a semi related note, T2K wise as part of some notes on what I thought UK Forces in Cyprus might look like in the summer of 2000 I had the British Army taking under command a number of the UN peacekeeping contingents who were stationed on the island and became effectively stranded there when the War started, including one from the Irish Defence Force, thus resulting in British and Irish soldiers serving alongside each other.
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  #36  
Old 11-13-2010, 11:50 AM
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Impressed to see Jadotville is known about! They call the Congo, "The Forgotten War" over here since there was little or no recognition of that, the Niemba ambush, Second Battle for the Tunnel or the numerous contacts they had.

Just thought I'd post to clear up a few points and to clarify what Mohoender and RN7 were saying. The latters done a fantastic job of outlaying the British capabilities so I thought I'd help uphold the flag (nah, taking the piss!). I'll try to give an overview of the Irish military strength at the time.

Confusion over names: The Irish Reserves were renamed the Reserve Defence Forces in 2005 (RDF), replacing the FCA and ANM(naval reserve) with the Army Reserve(AR) and Naval Reserve(NR). I'll be using both terms throughout but since this is T2K, you can assume I mean the FCA to avoid anarchorisms!


So here goes my shot at the T2K Irish Defence Forces Orbat 1995

The NATO orbat 1989 gives a surprisingly detailed layout. (http://www.scribd.com/doc/37695/NATO...of-Battle-1989)

1. Southern Command

a. 1st Brigade – Cork:

1. 2 Infantry Bns, each: 2 Rifle Cos, Support Co.
2. 1 Cavalry Recon Squadron
3. 1 Field Artillery Regt 4. 1 Engineer Co

b. FCA Group, Southern Command – Cork:

1. 6 Infantry Battalions
2. 1 Motorised Reconnaissance Squadron
3. 2 Field Artillery Regiments
4. 2 Air Defence Batteries
5. 1 Field Engineer Company

2. Eastern Command

a. 2nd Brigade – Dublin:

1. 2 Infantry Bns, each: 2 Rifle Cos, Support Co.
2. 1 Cavalry Recon Squadron
3. 1 Field Artillery Regt
4. 1 Engineer Co

b. Eastern Command Infantry Force – Gormanston: 2 Infantry Bns

c. FCA Group, Eastern Command – Dublin:

1. 4 Infantry Battalions
2. 1 Motorised Reconnaissance Squadron
3. 1 Field Artillery Regiment
4. 1 Air Defence Battery
5. 1 Field Engineer Company

3. Western Command

a. 4th Brigade – Athlone:


1. 2 Infantry Bns, each: 2 Rifle Cos, Support Co.
2. 1 Cavalry Recon Squadron
3. 1 Field Artillery Regt
4. 1 Engineer Co b. 28th Infantry Battalion (Reinforced) – Finner Camp, Bundoran:


c. FCA Group, Western Command – Athlone:


1. 6 Infantry Battalions
2. 1 Motorised Reconnaissance Squadron
3. 2 Field Artillery Regiments
4. 1 Field Engineer Company

4. Curragh Command


a. 6th Brigade – Curragh Camp, County Kildare:


1. 2 Infantry Battalions, each: 2 Rifle Cos, Support Co.
2. 1 Armored Recon Squadron
3. 1 Field Artillery Battery

b. Army Ranger Unit – Curragh Camp:

c. 1st Tank Squadron – Curragh Camp:

14 CVR(T) Scorpions

d. 1st Air Defense Regiment – Curragh Camp:

1 Regular, 3 FCA Air Defense Batteries

e. FCA Group Curragh Command – Curragh:

1. 2 Infantry Battalions
2. 1 Field Artillery Regiment


5. Forces Assigned To UN Duties:


a. UNIFIL Infantry Bn – Lebanon: Formed from elements of other units, includes 4 AML-90, 10 Sisu APC, 4 120mm Mortars.

Note 1: One of the Brigades has a third infantry battalion.

Note 2: Equipment holdings as of early 1990:
14 Scorpion
19 AML-90
32 AML-60, 60 Panhard VTT (Janes says
47)
10 Timoney APCs
48 25pdr Field Guns
12 105mm Light Guns
400 81mm mortars
72 120mm mortars
21 MILAN launchers
444 84mm Carl Gustav’s
96 90mm PV-1110 RR (Finnish?)
24 Bofors 40L60 AA Guns
2 40L70,
7 RBS-70 SAMs

Strength:

The Irish Army's strength would stand around 8,500 as it generally remains at a static size in peacetime. Another 13-14,000 is in the FCA.

There is also a second reserve force in Ireland concisting of former members of the PDF and the Integrated Reserve. Former members are maintained on the rolls. More active members comprise a First Line reserve that in the event of a crisis would be activated before the FCA as they have superior experience and training. The Integrated Reserve is also expected to boost the manpower of PDF units whereas the FCA would be expected to operate seperately and only provide replacements in a dire case. I'm not sure how long former PDF members serve in the First Line reserve but I assume that older members would maintain a lower state of readiness but still be available to be called up in a crisis.

Infantry Weapons:

5.56mm Steyr AUG A1, 9mm Browning handgun, 7.62mm GPMG, 60mm mortars, 81mm Denel mortars, 120mm Brandt mortars. The aforementioned MILAN and Carl Gustav's. Most weapons are up to NATO standard and imported. A limited arms industry does exist though.

Reserve weapons- though officially the FN FAL was replaced in 1988 by the Steyr, the changeover took a longer time with the Army Reserve. Several units were still using them until 2002 before receiving the more modern rifle. Also the MK3 version of the Bren Gun was also a popular reserve weapon until it was finally replaced in 2006 by the GPMG. The Carl Gustav M/45 sub-machine gun was still being used by the PDF till the late 80s and many Reserve units also held onto these venerable weapons as they'd proved themselves in the Congo and Lebanon. Large stocks of these weapons were maintained for years after they were declared obsolete. I know for a fact that the Brens weren't taken care of till at least 2008 so there is an arms surplus in the country during T2K.


Irish Air Corp
1. COIN Squadron: 6 CM-170-2 Super Magister

2. COIN/Training Squadron: 7 SF-260WE, 1 SF-260 MC, 2 SA-342L helos

3. Army Support Squadron: 8 SA-316B Helos

4. Other aircraft: 5 SA-365 in SAR, Naval roles, 7 F-172s in Liason role, 1 HS-125, 1 Super King Air 200

Strength: The Irish Air Corp's strength is just under a thousand, standing at 935.

Irish Naval Service

Deirdre Class Offshore Patrol Vessels:

LÉ Deirdre (P20) (1972–2000)
LÉ Emer (P21) (1978-In Active Service)
LÉ Aoife (P22) (1979-In Active Service)
LÉ Aisling (P23) (1980-In Active Service)

Eithne Class Offshore/Helicopter Patrol Vessel:

LÉ Eithne (P31) (1984-In Active Service)

Peacock Class Coastal Patrol Vessels:

LÉ Orla (P41) (1985-In Active Service)
LÉ Ciara (P42) (1989-In Active Service)

Those are the vessels that would be definetely operational at the time. Given that T2K is an alternative darker history, it is possible that certain vessels weren't decommisioned when they were and that production on others was ordered ahead of time. Particularly since the last two only entered service four or five years after canon says the war began.

Possible Vessels:

Ton-class Minesweepers:

LÉ Grainne (CM10) (1971–1987)
LÉ Banba (CM11) (1971–1984)
LÉ Fola (CM12) (1971–1987)

Róis*n class Offshore Patrol Vessels:

LÉ Róis*n (P51) (1999-In Active Service)
LÉ Niamh (P52) (2001-In Active Service)

The Irish Naval Service also contains the Naval Service Diving Section (NSDS) which conducts combat diving alongside duties such as EOD and SAR. In addition, it also has nominal control over the SAR helicopters belonging to the Irish Coast Guard which is not a military organization.

Strength: The Irish Naval Service has a strength of around 1,444 with another 400 in the reserve.

Civil Units


Garda Siochana

A primarily unarmed policing force, the Garda concists of around 15,000 uniformed patrolling officers. Training in firearms is provided but the normal officer on the street is unarmed except in extreme instances. Special armed units do exist though, such as the ERU(Emergency Response Unit) which train with Army special forces. Specialist water, diver, air and dog units are also present in the Gardai.

Civil Defense

Civil Defense Ireland is the national civil defense organisation in the Republic. It possesses several different services such as an auxiliary fire service, SAR, Ambulance, Water Rescue, Warden (communications/radiation) and Welfare. A volunteer organisation, it has 6,000 members.

Military Standard

Despite Ireland's neutrality, it does have an unexpected amount of combat experience amongst its ranks. The start of the modern army was really the Congo where the soldiers were deployed with World War 2 equipment and emerged with top grade NATO arms and tools by the conclusion of the crisis. 6,000 Irishmen served in the Congo and managed to revitalize a stagnant, corrupt and antiquated force. Peacekeeping would continue in the 70s, with service in Cyprus and the Middle East. 9,000 Irish soldiers have served in Cyprus since 1964.

The one of most relevance to T2K though is service in Lebanon. Beginning in 1978, Irish troops have been part of UNIFIL until 2001. 30,000 Irish soldiers served in Lebanon, meaning by the mid-90s, the majority of the Irish army had been deployed abroad at least once. 47 were killed and they faced frequent hazards from IED's, ambushes and artillery fire. Engagements with the Israeli's, SLA and Hezbollah all occured at one time or another. So while the Republic's armed forces might have a lack of combat experience compared to the UK in this scenario, the Irish forces will at least have some idea of what conflict is like.

State in T2K:
The one issue I have with this scenario is thus. I believe the British Army would royally trash the IDF in a conflict in Northern Ireland, their professional standard and resources is undeniable. I just find it inappropriate with the setting. I can hardly see them deploying MBT's in what is effectively a sideshow while the armour is desperately needed in Europe. Even in history, no matter the severity of the conflict, Ireland has always been a secondary or tertiary priority for British forces. The most I can see happening is a primarily infantry based conflict raging across the island, not the curbstomp envisaged.

As far as I'm aware of, the only nuclear attack suffered in Ireland was in Cork (hooray!). Therefore the only affected units would be Southern Command. Their Headquarters infrastructure in Cork itself, along with a couple of formations would be a clean write-up. But the majority of the Command, along with FCA units would be spared. Nuclear fallout could hit Haulbowline Island, the Naval base though. Therefore the Irish military structure would be reasonably intact compared to much of Europes.

In a conflict scenario, I could see a few frigates being detached to eliminate any Irish naval assets and bombing flights being directed to Baldonnell Aerodrome to ensure the Air Corp become a memory. This would leave the Irish Army, an infantry-based force but still with substantial numbers of soldiers. The countryside and urban areas of Northern Ireland would be prime territory for them.

I don't see a victory for either side, a bloody stalemate more like. Any major Irish gains would be halted by temporary diversion of British units while a British campaign would never be completed due to lack of resources in the sideshow conflict. A settlement would probably be negotiated since there are fair more bigger fish for the British to be concerned about!
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  #37  
Old 11-14-2010, 09:15 AM
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Rapparee, that's an impressive write up - well done.

FWIW I totally agree with you that the UK is simply not going to send an armoured Regiment (or even part thereof) across the Irish Sea - as you rightly state there's a far greater need for those tanks in Europe.

if you follow canon I believe it isn't so much the Irish Army up against British regulars - it's effectively the Irish Army fighting the Ulster Defence Regiment (with perhaps a small number of regulars in support roles).

I also agree with your conclusion that a stalemate would be the most likely outcome. The catalyst for peace negotiations might be the return from Europe of the BAOR (iirc two Divisions are back in the UK by the end of 2000 / start of 2001, with three more to follow later in 2001). That said, I think there's a lot of work to be done in the UK before any thought would be given to sending any of the European veterans to NI, but if they do finally cross the Irish Sea that's going to be a huge gamechanger. I'd expect the Republic to want to go to the negotiating table before that happened.
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  #38  
Old 02-10-2011, 12:50 PM
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Here is something to complete the already impressive post by Rapparee:

- Arm na hÉireann (Irish Army)
o Army HQ
 Army HQ (Parkgate-Dublin)
 Engineer Survey Coy. (Phoenix Park-Dublin)
 Army HQ Signals Coy. (McKee Barracks-Dublin)
 1st Garrison Coy. MP (Government Buildings-Dublin)
o Eastern Command
 Command HQ (Collins Barracks-Dublin)
 McKee Barracks Coy. (McKee Barracks-Dublin)
 Clancy Barracks Coy. (Clancy Barracks-Dublin)
 2nd Maintenance Engineer Coy. (Collins Barracks-Dublin)
 Army Ordnance School (Dublin)
 2nd Garrison Ordnance Coy. (Cathal Brugha Barracks-Dublin)
 2nd Garrison Supply & Transport Coy. (McKee Barracks-Dublin)
 Base Workshops Coy. Supply & Transport Corps (Clancy Barracks-Dublin)
 2nd Hospital Coy. (St. Bricin’s Hospital-Dublin)
 St. Bricin’s Hospital (Dublin)
 2nd Garrison Coy. MP (Collins Barracks-Dublin)
 Army School of Music (Cathal Brugha Barracks-Dublin)
 No. 1 Army Band (Cathal Brugha Barracks-Dublin)
 Command Training Depot (Cathal Brugha Barracks-Dublin)
 Equitation School (McKee Barracks-Dublin)
 Army Catering School (McKee Barracks-Dublin)
o 2nd Infantry Brigade
 Bde. HQ (Collins Barracks-Dublin)
 2nd Infantry Bn. (Cathal Brugha Barracks-Dublin)
 5th Infantry Bn. (Collins Barracks-Dublin/12 Panhard M3)
 2nd Cavalry Sqn. (Cathal Brugha Barracks-Dublin/10 Panhard AML, 3 XA-180)
 2nd Field Artillery Rgt (McKee Barracks-Dublin/6 L118 and 6 QF25)
 2nd Field Engineer Co (Clancy Barracks-Dublin)
 2nd Field Signals Co (Collins Barrracks-Dublin)
 2nd Field Supply & Transport Coy. (Collins Barracks-Dublin)
 2nd Field Medical Coy. (FCA/Cathal Brugha Barracks-Dublin)
 2nd Field Coy. MP (FCA/Collins Barracks-Dublin)
o Eastern Command Infantry Force
 HQ (Gormanston. Meath)
 27th Infantry Bn. (Dundalk, Gormanston, Castleblaney)
 29th Infantry Bn. (Cootehill, Monaghan, Cavan/5 Panhard M3)
o Eastern Command FCA Group
 HQ (Cathal Brugha Barracks-Dublin)
 7th Infantry Bn. (McKee Barracks-Dublin, Swords, Navan, Kells)
 8th Infantry Bn. (Dundalk, Drogheda, Castleblaney, Cavan, Balieboro)
 20th Infantry Bn. (Cathal Brugha Barracks-Dublin)
 21st Infantry Bn. (Bray, Dun Loaghaire, Wicklow)
 11th Cavalry Sqn. (Cathal Brugha Barracks-Dublin/4 Panhard AML)
 7th Field Artillery Rgt. (McKee Barracks-Dublin/12 Brandt 120mm)
 2nd Air Defense Bty (Cathal Brugha Barracks-Dublin/6 Bofors)
 11th Field Engineer Coy. (Clancy Barracks-Dublin)
 11th Field Signals Coy. (Cathal Brugha Barracks-Dublin)
 11th Field Supply & Transport Coy. (Collins Barracks-Dublin)
 11th Field Medical Coy. (Cathal Brugha Barracks-Dublin)
 6th Field Coy. MP (Collins Barracks-Dublin)
o Southern Command
 Command HQ (Cork)
 3rd Maintenance Engineer Coy. (Cork)
 3rd Garrison Ordnance Coy. (Cork)
 3rd Garrison Supply & Transport Coy. (Cork)
 3rd Hospital Coy. (Cork)
 3rd Garrison Coy. MP (Cork)
 Command Training Depot (Cork)
 Band of the Southern Command (Cork)
o 1st Infantry Brigade
 Bde. HQ (Cork)
3rd Infantry Bn. (Kilkenny, Curragh/16 Panhard M3)
 4th Infantry Bn. (Cork)
 12th Infantry Bn. (Limerick, Clonmel)
 1st Cavalry Sqn. (Fermoy/10 Panhard AML, 3 XA-180)
 1st Field Artillery Rgt (Balincollig/6 L118, 6 Brandt 120mm)
 1st Field Engineer Co (Cork)
 1st Field Signals Co (Cork)
 1st Field Supply & Transport Coy. (Cork)
 1st Field Medical Coy. (FCA/Cork)
 1st Field Coy. MP (Cork)
o Southern Command FCA Group
 HQ (Limerick)
 11th Infantry Bn. (Bandon, Bantry, Clonakilty, Macroom, Skibbereen)
 13th Infantry Bn. (Fermoy, Cahir, Dungarvan, Kanturk, Mallow)
 14th Infantry Bn. (Limerick, Nenagh, Croom, Kilmallock, Newcastle West, Tipperary)
 15th Infantry Bn. (Tralee, Cahirciveen, Dingle, Killarney, Killorglin, Listowel)
 22nd Infantry Bn. (Ennis, Labinch, Killaloe, Kilrush)
 23rd Infantry Bn. (Cork, Middleton)
 3rd Cavalry Sqn. (Clonmel/4 Panhard AML)
 3rd Field Artillery Rgt (Templemore/6 QF25 and 12 Brandt 120mm)
 8th Field Artillery Rgt. (Ballincollig/6 QF25 and 6 Brandt 120mm)
 3rd Air Defense Bty. (Limerick/6 Bofors)
 4th Air Defense Bty. (Cobh/6 Bofors)
 3rd Field Engineer Coy. (Limerick)
 3rd Field Signals Coy. (Limerick)
 3rd Field Supply & Transport Coy. (Limerick)
 3rd Field Medical Coy. (Limerick)
 3rd Field Coy. MP (Limerick)
o Western Command
 Command HQ (Athlone)
 4th Maintenance Engineer Coy. (Athlone)
 4th Garrison Ordnance Coy. (Athlone)
 4th Garrison Supply & Transport Coy. (Athlone)
 4th Hospital Coy. (Athlone)
 4th Garrison Coy. MP (Athlone)
 Command Training Depot (Athlone)
 University Student Admin. Coy. (Galway)
 Band of the Southern Command (Athlone)
o 4th Infantry Brigade
 Bde. HQ (Athlone)
 1st Infantry Bn. (Galway)
 6th Infantry Bn. (Athlone/14 Panhard M3)
 28th Infantry Bn. (Finner Camp, Lifford, Letterkenny)
 4th Cavalry Sqn. (Longford/10 Panhard AML, 3 XA-180)
 4th Field Artillery Rgt (Mullingar/6 L118, 6 Brandt 120mm)
 4th Field Engineer Co (Athlone)
 4th Field Signals Co (Athlone)
 4th Field Supply & Transport Coy. (Athlone)
 4th Field Medical Coy. (FCA/Athlone)
 4th Field Coy. MP (FCA/Athlone)
Band of the 4th Brigade (Athlone)
4th Brigade Training Centre
o Western Command FCA Group
 HQ (Galway)
 16th Infantry Bn. (Athlone, Ballinasloe, Tulamore, Ruscommon)
 17th Infantry Bn. (Longford, Granard, Stroke, Ballyconnel, Mohill)
 18th Infantry Bn. (Westport, Enniscrone, Swinford, Ballina)
 19th Infantry Bn. (Boyle, Carrick-on-Shannon, Dallymote, Castlera, Manorhamilton)
 24th Infantry Bn. (Letterkenny, Donegal, Carndonagh, Milford)
 25th Infantry Bn. (Galway, Clifden, Athenry, Loughrea)
 5th Cavalry Sqn. (Castlebar/4 Panhard AML)
 5th Field Artillery Rgt. (Galway/6 QF25 and 12 Brandt 120mm)
 9th Field Artillery Rgt. (Mullingar/12 Brandt 120mm)
 5th Field Engineer Coy. (Galway)
 5th Field Signals Coy. (Sligo)
 5th Field Supply & Transport Coy. (Galway)
 5th Field Medical Coy. (Galway)
 5th Field Coy. MP (Galway)
o Curragh Command
 HQ (Curragh Camp)
 Military College (Curragh)
 General Training Depot (Curragh)
 No.1 Security Coy. (Portlaoise Prison)
 Army Apprentice School (Naas)
 Army Ranger Wing (Curragh)
9th Infantry Bn. (Kilkenny, Dunamaggin, Ballyragget, Waterford, Portlaoise, Durrow)
10th Infantry Bn. (Wexford, New Ross, Carnew, Muinebeag, Carlow)
 1st Tank Sqn (Curragh/14 Scorpion, 5 XA-180)
6th Field Artillery Rgt (Kildare/12 QF25 and 6 Brandt 120)
1st Air Defence Rgt (Kildare/8 Bofors)
6th Field Signal Coy. (Curragh)
 Depot & School Cavalry (Curragh)

This is taken from Irish Army OOB 1923-2004 by Adrian J. English
ISBN 0972029672

You’ll find it on books.google.fr

What I put in Italic have been modified or added and doesn't reflect reality. If 2 XA-180 were effectively bought by Ireland, the other ten had been supplied by UN. In the original OOB they are either Panhard AML or Timoney APC. Also in the original OOB as given, there were only 6 L118 howitzer.

The reason I made these changes come from WW2 readings of the Irish Army. At the time, it had grown from 10.000 in 1938 to 40.000 by 1944. Whatever it is very personnal and open to debate.
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  #39  
Old 02-11-2011, 06:06 AM
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Canadian Army Canadian Army is offline
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Default Para-Military Forces in Ireland

Here are a some of the other units involved in Northern Ireland:

Irish Republican Army (IRA)
The central aim of the IRA is to end British control of Northern Ireland and to achieve the reunification of the island of Ireland. From a splinter group of a small and badly equipped paramilitary grouping the 'Provisional' IRA developed into a comparatively large, well financed, well equipped guerrilla organization which has been involved in, what it calls, an 'armed campaign' for almost three decades. Recently the IRA has split into two factions, those serving Arm Na Héireann (Irish Army) as security battalions in controlled Northern Ireland and those still active in British controlled Northern Ireland.

IRA Brigades (Active in British Controlled Northern Ireland)

IRA Army Council

Belfast Brigade:
  • Active Service Unit 1
  • Active Service Unit 2
  • Active Service Unit 3

East Tyrone Brigade:
  • Active Service Unit 4

North Antrim Brigade:
  • Active Service Unit 5

South Down Brigade:
  • Active Service Unit 6

Internal Security Squad (Interrogates and executes suspected informers)

Arsenal:
  • Armalite AR-15 Assault Rifle
  • Semtex (Commercial High Explosive*)
IRA Internal Security Battalions (Serving with Irish Army in Irish Controlled Northern Ireland):
  • 1 South Armagh Battalion; formerly of the South Armagh Brigade
  • 2 North Antrim Battalion; formerly of the North Antrim Brigade
  • 3 East Tyrone Battalion; formerly of the East Tyrone Brigade
  • 4 Belfast Battalion; formerly attached to the Belfast Brigade
  • 5 Belfast Battalion; formerly attached to the Belfast Brigade
  • 6 Belfast Battalion; formerly attached to the Belfast Brigade
  • 7 Fermanagh Battalion
  • 8 Derry Battalion; formerly attached to the Derry Brigade
Arsenal:
  • AK-47 / AKM Assault Rifle
  • 7.62mm FN MAG medium machine gun
  • 12.7mmx107mm DShK heavy machine gun
  • SAM-7 anti-aircraft launcher
  • RPG-7 rocket launcher
  • Webley .455 revolver
  • LPO-50 flame thrower
The Combined Loyalist Military Command (CLMC)
The Combined Loyalist Military Command original was an umbrella body for loyalist paramilitary groups in Northern Ireland set up in the early 1990’s. Bringing together the leaderships of the Ulster Defence Association, the Ulster Volunteer Force and the Red Hand Commandos, the CLMC sought to ensure that the groups would work towards the same goals. On November 10 1997, the Ulster Volunteer Force, the Ulster Defence Association, the Red Hand Commandos joined together in the Combined Loyalist Military Command, to form united front against the invading Óglaigh na hÉireann (Irish Defence Forces). The CLMC is organised in 13 companies (organized along traditional British Infantry Companies), with members often were a red beret. Its current strength is 2,000 members.

Units:
  • Belfast Company
  • Ards Company
  • Lisburn Company
  • Bainbridge Company
  • Coleraine Company
  • Ballmoney Company
  • Ballmena Company
  • Larne Company
  • Antrim Company
  • Armagh Company
  • Craigavon Company
  • North Down Company
  • Carrickfergus Company
Arsenal:
  • Czech Sa vz. 58 Assault Rifle
  • AK-47 Rifle
  • Enfield No. 2 Mk I Revolver
  • Uzi Sub-Machinegun
  • Browning Pistol
  • RGD-5 Offensive Grenade
  • RPG-7 Rocket Launcher
Royal Ulster Constabulary
The Royal Ulster Constabulary is the police force in Northern Ireland. The force has come under a lot of criticism from the nationalist community since its inception but particularly since the beginning of the conflict. The RUC had approximately 8,500 officers (The RUC Reserve was made up of 1,500 part-time and 3,200 full-time officers); almost entirely drawn from the Protestant community. Unlike the majority of police forces in the United Kingdom, the RUC is the only territorial police force that is armed, officers are issued the Ruger Security Six revolvers, and either the Heckler & Koch MP5 semi-automatic carbine, or rifles such as Heckler & Koch G3s or HK33s as well as Ruger Mini-14 select fire rifles.
RUC Special Branch
The Special Branch is formally constituted as E Department. It is organized and subdivided by function into three regions (Belfast, North and South). E1 looks after vetting of personnel, internal security, and the supply of under cover vehicles and security of communications (mail and telecommunications). E2 is the department responsible for legal liaison, the interrogation centres and SB activity in prisons. E3 collates all intelligence gathered by field operators, informers and uniformed officers. E4 is the operations division which carries out the day-to-day field work of intelligence gathering.
Headquarters Mobile Support Unit (HMSU)
The HMSU is a special unit established in 1978 by the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) and is the RUC equivalent of the Special Air Service (SAS). Members of the HMSU were drawn from RUC Special Branch and were trained by the SAS to on how to confront Irish Republican Army (IRA) members with 'firepower, speed and aggression'. The unit works in collaboration with the RUC intelligence gathering unit.
Royal Ulster Constabulary Reserve (RUCR):
A special reserve force attached to the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC). The force is made up of 1,500 full-time and 3,200 part-time members.
Divisional Mobile Support Unit (DMSU)
DMSUs operate under the control of headquarters in the respective 12 Divisional Command areas. All DMSUs receive additional training from RUC/British Army specialists at the Operations Training Unit based in Palace Barracks. Back-up for DMSUs is provided from within the RUCR some of whom are formed into Shadow DMSUs.
*The IRA has always made use of 'home-made' explosives. These explosives became more sophisticated and more powerful over the years and included home-made mortars and fertilizer-based car and lorry bombs.
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Last edited by Canadian Army; 02-11-2011 at 06:12 AM.
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Old 02-11-2011, 06:43 AM
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I think it's time I post my OOB for British Forces in Northern Ireland:

Northern Ireland Command
HQ Northern Ireland is the command formation responsible for the administration of all British Armed Forces stationed in and around Northern Ireland.
HQ Northern Ireland
  • 6 Regiment, Royal Military Police*
  • 233 Signal Squadron, 15 Signal Regiment
  • 591(Independent) Field Squadron, Royal Engineers (EOD)
Northern Ireland Command Military Intelligence
  • 12th Intelligence and Security Company**
  • 14th Intelligence Company***
  • Force Research Unit****
40 (Ulster) Signal Regiment
40 (Ulster) Signal Regiment is Territorial Army regiment in the Royal Corps of Signals in the British Army. The regiment forms part of 2 (National Communications) Signal Brigade, re-establish some form of regional Government communications infrastructure in the aftermath of a nuclear strike on the UK. The regiment does not have an internal security role in Northern Ireland.

Royal Air Force; RAF Aldergrove
With the elimination of the Irish Air Corps and growing need for aircraft in other theatres, No. 18 Squadron, RAF, No. 72 Squadron, RAF and 5 Regiment, Army Air Corps were redeployed in 1997 leaving only a small force of one Chinook HC2, one Britten-Norman Islander, two Westland Gazelle AH1 No. 3 Squadron, RAF Regiment and the small staff at the Royal Air Force's
  • Reconnaissance Intelligence Centre
  • No. 18 Squadron, RAF
  • No. 72 Squadron, RAF
  • 651 Squadron; 5 Regiment, Army Air Corps
  • No. 3 Squadron, RAF Regiment (Ground Defence)
  • Royal Air Force's Reconnaissance Intelligence Centre (Northern Ireland)
36th (Ulster) Infantry Division [Motorized Infantry]
The 36th (Ulster) Infantry Division (36 ID)(taking it’s name from the 36th (Ulster) Division of Lord Kitchener's New Army) is an motorized infantry division of the British Army formed around the battalions, of the Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR) in 1996. The Division replaced the 3rd, 9th, and 39th Infantry Brigades; who were deployed to European and Middle Eastern Theatres; as the main security force in Northern Ireland.
  • Headquarters and Signals Battalion (225 Signal Squadron, 15 Signal Regiment)
  • No. 1 (Lovat Scouts) Company, 51st Highland Volunteers*****
107 (Antrim) Defence Brigade
  • 1st (County Antrim) Battalion******, Ulster Defence Regiment
  • 9th (Country Antrim) Battalion, Ulster Defence Regiment
  • 10th (City of Belfast) Battalion, Ulster Defence Regiment
  • 7th (City of Belfast) Battalion, Ulster Defence Regiment
108 (Tyrone) Brigade
  • 6th (County Tyrone) Battalion, Ulster Defence Regiment
  • 8th (County Tyrone) Battalion, Ulster Defence Regiment
  • 11th (Craigavon) Battalion, Ulster Defence Regiment
  • Queen’s University/Belfast University Officer Training Corps Battalion
109 (Londonderry) Brigade
  • 2nd (County Armagh) Battalion, Ulster Defence Regiment
  • 3rd (County Down) Battalion, Ulster Defence Regiment
  • 5th (County Londonderry) Battalion, Ulster Defence Regiment
  • 4th (County Fermanagh) Battalion, Ulster Defence Regiment
Northern Ireland Squadron, Royal Navy
The Northern Ireland Squadron is a unit of the Royal Navy; established during the early days of the conflict in Northern Ireland. The squadron was moved to HM Naval Base Clyde, aka Faslane Naval Base, Scotland in 1993. Also in 1993, the River-class ships were subsequently assigned to the Northern Ireland Squadron where they replaced Ton-class vessels patrolling the province's waterways and participating in counter-terrorist operations in support of the British Army and the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC). On November 1 1997 the IRA sank the HMS Helford, HMS Blackwater, HMS Itchen, HMS Orwell, and HMS Spey and remnants British Northern Ireland Squadron were redeployed to Mediterranean; with destruction of Irish Naval Service and elimination of IRA sea threat, two months later. In 1998 the sunken ships were salvage and under went repairs in order to return them to active duty, but since the nuclear attacks all repairs on the ships have stopped.
  • HMS Blackwater (M2008) – salvage and under going repairs at Alexandra Dock
  • HMS Itchen (M2009) – salvage and under going repairs at Alexandra Dock
  • HMS Spey (M2013) – salvage and under going repairs at Alexandra Dock
  • HMS Arun (M2014) – Cyprus, Eastern Sovereign Base Area
  • HMS Helford (M2006) – salvage and under going repairs at Alexandra Dock
  • HMS Orwell (M2011) – Cyprus, Eastern Sovereign Base Area
  • HMS Caroline (D44) *******

* Includes the 243 Provost Company (Volunteers), Royal Military Police

**Conducts undercover Electronic Warfare; including Electronic surveillance/interception operations.

***Conducts undercover surveillance operations against suspected members of Irish republican and loyalist paramilitary groups.

****An ultra-secret unit that is responsible surveillance and for Agent handling in Northern Ireland.

*****A specially trained Territorial Army Yeomanry infantry company that acts in the Anti-Sniper/Sniper role.

******All battalions of the 36th UDD are Motorized Infantry with the battalions organized as follows: 5x AT-105C Saxon - Command vehicle (Headquarters and Headquarters Company), Weapons Company: 16x Land Rover Defender Series III - Beeswing ATGM Launchers (Antitank Platoon), 8x AT-105MR Saxon - 51 mm mortar (Mortar Platoon), and 8x FV 721 Fox Combat Vehicle Reconnaissance (wheeled) (Recon Platoon). Three Rifle Companies, each with: 16x Snatch Land Rovers/Land Rover Defender Series III.

******* The HMS Caroline acts as a static headquarters and training ship for the Royal Naval Reserve (RNR), based in Alexandra Dock, Belfast, Northern Ireland. She is the last remaining British World War I light cruiser in service, and the last survivor of the Battle of Jutland still afloat. Although no longer capable of making way under her own steam, she remains afloat and in excellent condition.
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Old 02-11-2011, 07:59 AM
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Nice to see the Caroline getting a mention, she's a great old lady I've a few pics of her somewhere if anyones interested?

Sadly Caroline is due to be retired in the near future as she is in need of a more intensive overhaul than the RNR can manage on site. Hopefully she'll be turned into a museum and stay in Belfast, but sadly there are no guarantees on that
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Old 02-11-2011, 04:40 PM
Sanjuro Sanjuro is offline
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I also have some issues with PIRA being able to sink those minesweepers; firstly, mounting weapons that big on a motorboat is a lot more difficult than it sounds (British merchant vessels were only able to be armed during WW2 because they were legally required to have the mountings, and under-deck bracing, as part of British registry)- even a recoilless rifle is going to be difficult. Actually hitting the target would be very difficult- the lower Clyde and Firth of Clyde are rarely entirely calm, so keeping small motorboats stable enough for multiple shots would be very difficult. Probably the only practical weapons for the job would be the RPG7- and that means getting close, and being exposed to defending fire.
Secondly, as others have posted, the Clyde Naval base is defended by troops who are trained and prepared for Spetsnatz type attacks; small boats are one of the threats they expect.
Thirdly, the Clyde Boom would have been closed; sure, the boats could go through the Kyles of Bute and bypass the boom, but in wartime the Kyles would be unlit at night.
Finally, in wartime the Clyde's usual busy traffic of yachts and small craft is going to be greatly reduced, making the attackers much more visible.
In peacetime, the attack is barely feasible; in wartime, a suicide mission, with little prospect of success.
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Old 02-12-2011, 06:24 AM
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Thanks for the info. Sanjuro. Maybe underwater swimmer with homemade explosive, or something else? Any suggestions!
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Old 02-12-2011, 02:27 PM
dragoon500ly dragoon500ly is offline
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My own take on it would be swimmers with explosive charges....there was footage floating around of a Iranian speed boat trying to attack a tanker with a recoilless rifle....the backblast set fire to the boat and blew two crewmembers overboard. And that was with a SPG-9; firing a 106mm......ouch!
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Old 02-12-2011, 06:58 PM
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Without a proper warship of some kind, they're probably only going to be successful (and live) with divers and limpet mines.
I wouldn't want to try it in winter though!
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Old 02-13-2011, 06:22 AM
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I still think if Irish terrorists had the resources (be that recoilless rifles, limpet mines or whatever) they'd be better employed using them against British Army targets in Northern Ireland.

Also, you've listed the IRA, but there were a number of other active terrorist groups in NI including the Irish National Liberation Army (INLA) and various different IRA factions.

Probably worth noting that there was often in fighting between the various different groups (both Republican and Loyalist) so there could well be a number of frictions within the Combined Loyalist Military Command.
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