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Old 01-21-2010, 11:13 PM
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Default The Winter War Pt 5, Question

Webstral 06-29-2004, 05:44 PM I'm working on The Winter War Pt 5, and I'm wondering what you guys want to see covered next. Chronologically, I should go back to November and deal with developments on the ground in Manchuria. However, it might be more interesting to pursue Operation Tchaikovsky II and its naval counterpart, wherein the Soviets expand the air and sea war to smash Chinese industry all over the country and keep Western goods and arms from entering China's ports. What do you think?


Webstral

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Matt Wiser 06-29-2004, 07:12 PM Just my two cents worth, but since we haven't seen any naval action yet, how about some? Manchuria is going to be pretty quiet in terms of major action until Spring, other than probes, patrol action, artillery exchanges, Special Ops activity,etc. Seeing the naval war and its effects on the other countries in the region (the Koreas, Japan, Taiwan, Vietnam) and on third-country shipping going to those countries would be something to be explored. And since the Chinese Navy is going to be torn up by the SOVPACFLT, the PRC is going to be shopping for new construction or surplus to replace attrition, especially since some of their shipyards are now junk heaps by this time. One additional way for the U.S. to help out would be to have PRC ships and subs refitted in American shipyards-new radar, sonar, EW fits, improved SAM and SSM systems (early Standard SM-1 and Harpoon 1A), etc. Same thing for UK,French, German, and Italian yards. Any new construction is going to be either requestioned in late '96, or still caught on the ways when the nukes fall.

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Jason Weiser 06-30-2004, 09:07 AM I would too Matt, but also, I'd like to see the political machinations and further reactions of the West, perhaps some of the lesser NATO allies and non-aligned folks try to broker a peace deal, but the UN falls apart? Writing up the UN coming apart at the seams might be a whole heap of fun.

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Dogger 06-30-2004, 12:42 PM I'm with Matt & Jason...both ideas sound good.

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shrike6 06-30-2004, 09:23 PM I like all those ideas guys but personally I'd like to read part 4 first.

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graebarde 07-01-2004, 12:52 AM I'm not picky as long as I can get them in the right order when I print them up. They are at 65 pages nd counting IF you make breaks at the chapters. ME I want it ALL, though the naval sounds interesting. It is your writing, which ever is best for you.


BTW I bet you have one hell of a war room, with maps all over, and red and blue pins in the wall. Or better yet back lit plexiglass and markers over the maps.. yeah that's it.. or heck now it's all cybermaps and electrionic dots..


How DO you keep track of the war? I know from playing WW3 it's no easy task, esp when your reporting as you do the movements of specific units.


Awaiting more.. more.. more...

Great job... and I WILL buy the book, IF it is autographed.


Grae

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Webstral 07-06-2004, 12:27 PM The banal truth is that I don't have much of a war room at all. When I'm writing I keep my trusty world atlas by my side. That's about it, really. I have a good memory for what units are where, though I have a hard time with remembering what's on the honey-do list. (My fiancee can't seem to grasp how critical a role motivation plays in a man's powers of recall.) When I can't remember who was where, I can go back in the narrative a bit. This is one advantage of keeping track of corps-level movements instead of trying to track individual divisions.


Thanks for the encouragement!


Webstral

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