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  #31  
Old 05-30-2021, 05:31 AM
Ursus Maior Ursus Maior is offline
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Just remember: if it can still kill you, it's not obsolete. A well placed 76-mm from an Easy Eight Sherman or an 85-mm from a T-34/85 can still ruin your day.
That's bit too vague for a proper definition. Can a Sherman still kill "you" personally? Yes of course. But can it fulfill the role of an MBT on a modern battlefield? Certainly not, as it was designed before the MBT role had been defined and is by now an 80 old design. That certainly makes it obsolete as a weapon on a modern battlefield. Otherwise, by your definition, sticks and stones would also still be non-obsolete weapons.

As for a Twilight 2000 setting: Well, if no-one has working tanks for dozens of kilometers than a Sherman in running condition, fueled up and stacked with ammunition is as good as it was in the 1940s. Rifles, handgrenades and automatic weapons haven't changed that much. But beware of someone pulling out a Carl Gustaf. It's from the same decade, but at 400 meters it's going to go right through that Sherman.
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  #32  
Old 05-30-2021, 04:26 PM
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Default Antiquated armour in the T2k universe

I can see some of the more common antiquated vehicles being reactivated as there are few if any electrical components to be maintained, and most of the mechanical systems can be maintained by an automotive garage or a heavy equipment workshop. Both of these places will have the capabilty to custom fabricate parts, assuming of course they have people with the required skills.
Engines, running gear and POL will be a major headache as well, and the manuals for these vehicles will be long gone, so repacement and repair will be a major case of improvisation.
Ammunition will of course be a large problem, however, a tank with a coaxial machine gun and a pintle mounted machine gun is still something to respect if you have limited antitank equipment. I can see some real "franken weapons" coming into service as the modern spares and hanger queens are used up to make good on battlefield losses. Picture a demilled Sherman tank with a ball mounted M1919, Bofors 40mm gun in lieu of the 75mm gun, an M60 pintlle mount, and a M40 recoiless rifle mounted on the turret bustle as part of the rapid reaction force of a cantonment.
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  #33  
Old 05-30-2021, 05:03 PM
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Ammunition will of course be a large problem, however, a tank with a coaxial machine gun and a pintle mounted machine gun is still something to respect if you have limited antitank equipment. I can see some real "franken weapons" coming into service as the modern spares and hanger queens are used up to make good on battlefield losses. Picture a demilled Sherman tank with a ball mounted M1919, Bofors 40mm gun in lieu of the 75mm gun, an M60 pintlle mount, and a M40 recoiless rifle mounted on the turret bustle as part of the rapid reaction force of a cantonment.
Or as the centerpiece of a marauder formation. You don't need APFSDSDU for intimidating the peasants and making an example of the odd resister who tries to off the warlord with a hunting rifle. Put some 40mm into a few church steeples (and the snipers in them) and the rest of the subjects wise up real quick.

Enter the PCs, stage left...

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  #34  
Old 05-31-2021, 07:04 PM
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Good call. And I think we'd see the same thing with the Mosin-Nagant. The Soviets/Russians had huge stockpiles. IIRC, they only started to flood the civilian market here in the States (you could get one at a sporting goods store for $100) after the dissolution of the USSR, when the Russians were doing whatever they could to bring in hard currency from the west. That wouldn't have happened in the v1 or v4 T2kUs.

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There would have been three-line rifles floating around from the era between the World Wars. Approximately 280,000 Remington and Westinghouse Mosins were bought by the US government after the Russian Revolution to keep those companies from going bankrupt, and while 50,000 were left in Russia after the Polar Bear Expedition departed, the remainder were sold as surplus for ~$3.50 each. Some were bought by a reseller and converted to .30-06 (which the rifle didn't handle well), but many if not most were sold by the Director of Civilian Marksmanship in their original chambering.
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  #35  
Old 06-01-2021, 12:16 AM
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Originally Posted by Vespers War View Post
There would have been three-line rifles floating around from the era between the World Wars. Approximately 280,000 Remington and Westinghouse Mosins were bought by the US government after the Russian Revolution to keep those companies from going bankrupt, and while 50,000 were left in Russia after the Polar Bear Expedition departed, the remainder were sold as surplus for ~$3.50 each. Some were bought by a reseller and converted to .30-06 (which the rifle didn't handle well), but many if not most were sold by the Director of Civilian Marksmanship in their original chambering.
Thanks, Vespers. I had no idea that US companies ever manufactured Mosins. I did a bit of following up and found this:

https://www.ammoland.com/2020/04/the...#axzz6wViyizdh

Nearly a million Mosins made in the USA! Looks like most of them got shipped overseas during the interwar years (Czechoslovakia, White Russia, Mexico, Spain via Finland), so one might encounter American Mosins just about anywhere in the T2kU.

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  #36  
Old 06-01-2021, 11:01 AM
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Not sure if this is right for here, or if it should be on the 'Frackentank thread', etc, but...

And not even sure if the T-55 counts as "antiquated" in T2K...

"T-55 chassis fitted with S-60 57 mm gun in Iraq".
https://armamentresearch.com/t-55-ch...m-gun-in-iraq/

T-55 + AA gun.
https://www.whatifmodellers.com/inde...3760.0#topic-1
https://www.whatifmodellers.com/index.php?topic=33760.0

Also, I think a similar vehicle has been posted here before (?)
https://thearabweekly.com/hezbollah-...ry-might-syria

I make models but, although, I look at the vehicles "that are"... I prefer "The T2K War that never was" hence the 'research'.

"And in other news"...

Has anyone one heard of this vehicle before? News to me. I don't believe Paul has 'stated' it... apologies if to Paul if he has:
https://www.butlersprintedmodels.co....ereh-20mm.html

And this could ruin your entire day:
https://www.butlersprintedmodels.co....5-aa-20mm.html
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  #37  
Old 06-01-2021, 12:15 PM
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Originally Posted by Brit View Post
Not sure if this is right for here, or if it should be on the 'Frackentank thread', etc, but...

And not even sure if the T-55 counts as "antiquated" in T2K...

"T-55 chassis fitted with S-60 57 mm gun in Iraq".
https://armamentresearch.com/t-55-ch...m-gun-in-iraq/

T-55 + AA gun.
https://www.whatifmodellers.com/inde...3760.0#topic-1
https://www.whatifmodellers.com/index.php?topic=33760.0

Also, I think a similar vehicle has been posted here before (?)
https://thearabweekly.com/hezbollah-...ry-might-syria
Don't forget the Finnish T-55 Marksman
https://weaponsystems.net/system/426-T-55+Marksman
http://www.military-today.com/artillery/marksman.htm



Quote:
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Has anyone one heard of this vehicle before? News to me. I don't believe Paul has 'stated' it... apologies if to Paul if he has:
https://www.butlersprintedmodels.co....ereh-20mm.html
http://www.military-today.com/missiles/pere.htm
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  #38  
Old 06-01-2021, 12:29 PM
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And not even sure if the T-55 counts as "antiquated" in T2K...
I wouldn't necessarily say so. One might differ on the semantics of obsolete vs. obsolescent, but most of the Warsaw Pact armies outside the USSR hat T-54s, T-55s and their various homebrew modernizations still in active frontline service. Given, not necessarily in the first tier divisions, but still very much in always active divisions. I think, Bulgaria even had T-34s in their Category C divisions.
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  #39  
Old 06-01-2021, 12:43 PM
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Has anyone one heard of this vehicle before? News to me. I don't believe Paul has 'stated' it... apologies if to Paul if he has:
https://www.butlersprintedmodels.co....ereh-20mm.html
The Pereh was one of Israel's best kept secrets for about three decades. They started fielding it in the 80s and declassified it in 2015, when it was phased out. That took about until 2017.

The Pereh ("Onager") was based on the Magach 5, i. e. M48 chassis, fitted with 12 Spike NLOS ATGM (range ca. 25 km). The missile itself was not known to the public until 2011. The gun kept a dummy gun to make it look less suspicious, but secondary armament encompassed only two FN MAGs as machine-guns, though additional front armor was used.

The Pereh is probably the best bang for your M48-bucks you could get. The Spike NLOS was recently bought bought by the UK and ordered by the US (in 2020). So it's still very much in the game.
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  #40  
Old 06-01-2021, 07:41 PM
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The Pereh was one of Israel's best kept secrets for about three decades. They started fielding it in the 80s and declassified it in 2015, when it was phased out. That took about until 2017.

The Pereh ("Onager") was based on the Magach 5, i. e. M48 chassis, fitted with 12 Spike NLOS ATGM (range ca. 25 km). The missile itself was not known to the public until 2011. The gun kept a dummy gun to make it look less suspicious, but secondary armament encompassed only two FN MAGs as machine-guns, though additional front armor was used.

The Pereh is probably the best bang for your M48-bucks you could get. The Spike NLOS was recently bought bought by the UK and ordered by the US (in 2020). So it's still very much in the game.
It's possibly worth noting that the UK received two different versions of Spike NLOS. The UK's Exactor-1 is the Spike NLOS Mk.2, and the Exactor-2 is the Spike NLOS Mk.5. The latter is the newest version, which has different airfoils from the other 4 versions, but other than that I haven't been able to find any descriptions of differences between the various marks.
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  #41  
Old 06-02-2021, 12:26 PM
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Has anyone one heard of this vehicle before? News to me. I don't believe Paul has 'stated' it... apologies if to Paul if he has:
https://www.butlersprintedmodels.co....ereh-20mm.html
I retained my security clearance until 2005 (tell me how that happened -- the Army is slooow sometimes, but if I had been dangerous...). However, though I did know about the Pereh, I would not have statted something I knew was classified.
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  #42  
Old 06-03-2021, 01:28 AM
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I'm no expert but it seems like the time and resource investment restoring mothballed vehicles would be better spent upgrading non-combat military vehicles or civilian vehicles for combat use.

If you've got a couple one-off oddball vehicles you're not likely to have any part donors or spare parts in general. When they break down or are damaged all the work you've put in will probably be wasted. The question of ammo is also really important.

Without spare treads your museum tank is just an armored gun emplacement. Without main gun ammo it's just an HMG emplacement. A bunch of sand bags could do the same job with fewer resources.

Turning some 6x6s into gun trucks or welding some pintle mounts to the rollbars on some Hiluxes seems like more bang for the buck. Parts are likely easier to find, the endurance is better, and for the same investment of resources you could get several vehicles outfitted.
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  #43  
Old 06-03-2021, 05:46 AM
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I'm no expert but it seems like the time and resource investment restoring mothballed vehicles would be better spent upgrading non-combat military vehicles or civilian vehicles for combat use.

If you've got a couple one-off oddball vehicles you're not likely to have any part donors or spare parts in general. When they break down or are damaged all the work you've put in will probably be wasted. The question of ammo is also really important.

Without spare treads your museum tank is just an armored gun emplacement. Without main gun ammo it's just an HMG emplacement. A bunch of sand bags could do the same job with fewer resources.

Turning some 6x6s into gun trucks or welding some pintle mounts to the rollbars on some Hiluxes seems like more bang for the buck. Parts are likely easier to find, the endurance is better, and for the same investment of resources you could get several vehicles outfitted.
This... A Hilux with a PK - even spawned the name of the 86-87 conflict between Chad and Libya - The Great Toyota War.
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  #44  
Old 06-03-2021, 08:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bash View Post
I'm no expert but it seems like the time and resource investment restoring mothballed vehicles would be better spent upgrading non-combat military vehicles or civilian vehicles for combat use.

If you've got a couple one-off oddball vehicles you're not likely to have any part donors or spare parts in general. When they break down or are damaged all the work you've put in will probably be wasted. The question of ammo is also really important.

Without spare treads your museum tank is just an armored gun emplacement. Without main gun ammo it's just an HMG emplacement. A bunch of sand bags could do the same job with fewer resources.

Turning some 6x6s into gun trucks or welding some pintle mounts to the rollbars on some Hiluxes seems like more bang for the buck. Parts are likely easier to find, the endurance is better, and for the same investment of resources you could get several vehicles outfitted.
You would be amazed at how many spare parts there are still out there for older vehicles to keep them running - the Littlefield Collection for one. And lots of very serious collectors as well besides him.

I grew up in a town with a gentleman who lived nearby who had a Sherman tank with a live barrel and a nice collection of thirty plus live rounds for it (including high explosive and armor piercing and one cannister round)and a whole garage full of spare parts. Definitely someone who was still alive in the timeline who would have put that old tank to very good use. He showed it in parades until well into the 90's.

Also not every outdated vehicle has a turret -there are tons of old Ferrets out there for instance - they run well and once you add the machine gun they are basically one hundred percent back to being a military vehicle - and would take a Ferret any day over an old pick up truck.
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  #45  
Old 06-03-2021, 08:40 AM
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You would be amazed at how many spare parts there are still out there for older vehicles to keep them running - the Littlefield Collection for one. And lots of very serious collectors as well besides him.

I grew up in a town with a gentleman who lived nearby who had a Sherman tank with a live barrel and a nice collection of thirty plus live rounds for it (including high explosive and armor piercing and one cannister round)and a whole garage full of spare parts. Definitely someone who was still alive in the timeline who would have put that old tank to very good use. He showed it in parades until well into the 90's.

Also not every outdated vehicle has a turret -there are tons of old Ferrets out there for instance - they run well and once you add the machine gun they are basically one hundred percent back to being a military vehicle - and would take a Ferret any day over an old pick up truck.
I dunno. Technicals (i e. Hilux with machine gun) do have their uses. Chad figured out that if they drove them over 100km/hr they could drive right through Libyan minefields without setting them off... That and it's very easy to procure them with aid grants from western nations when sanctions prevent military imports. The only way I see museum pieces being viable is in portions of the former USSR or in western nations. In the ME, Africa, SW Asia, they're too valuable as scrap to become pieces or they are too costly to do anything but abandon (like multiple African nation's airports currently hosting mouldering aircraft husks).
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  #46  
Old 06-03-2021, 08:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bash View Post
I'm no expert but it seems like the time and resource investment restoring mothballed vehicles would be better spent upgrading non-combat military vehicles or civilian vehicles for combat use.

If you've got a couple one-off oddball vehicles you're not likely to have any part donors or spare parts in general. When they break down or are damaged all the work you've put in will probably be wasted. The question of ammo is also really important.

Without spare treads your museum tank is just an armored gun emplacement. Without main gun ammo it's just an HMG emplacement. A bunch of sand bags could do the same job with fewer resources.

Turning some 6x6s into gun trucks or welding some pintle mounts to the rollbars on some Hiluxes seems like more bang for the buck. Parts are likely easier to find, the endurance is better, and for the same investment of resources you could get several vehicles outfitted.
Taking tank from museum and trying use it in battle is not good idea. Tanks and other combat vehicles need a lot of spare parts. Usually, museums donít have lot of spare parts and they have to hunt parts to get museum tank in order and I donít mean anything resembling combat use. Museum staff and retired tank mechanics usually need several years to get tank in running order. And in that case, they drive tank couple miles per year in shows.

Finnish armed force doesnít have mothballed equipment or weapons. All equipment and vehicles are in use, storage for war time use or under repair. In 1990 planned war time strength of Finnish Armed forces was something like 580 000 men in full mobilization. Modern weapons and equipment for everybody? Keep on dreamingÖ

Only 10 Jaeger brigades and two Armor brigades were using modern weapons and vehicles. Rest of the army should have used artillery, small arms and other equipment from 1930as to 1960s. Infantry brigades, local defense units, air force and navy didnít even get military trucks, they would have to use civilian trucks and farm tractors.

That all come to end after cold war. Finnish army bought huge amount of former East German equipment from Germany. One former officer told me that if all that equipment was loaded to single train that train would have been 40 kilometers long. All those much loved and hated M-39s, Stens and Suomi-SMGs were finally sold or scrapped, because all troops could be armed with Finnish, Soviet, East-German and Chinese Kalashnikovs.

Anyway, in Twilight 2000 world cold war didnít end and in 2000 AD men meet their fate in cold dark forests using the same weapons that their grandfathers used nearly 60 years earlier.
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  #47  
Old 06-03-2021, 09:44 AM
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I dunno. Technicals (i e. Hilux with machine gun) do have their uses. Chad figured out that if they drove them over 100km/hr they could drive right through Libyan minefields without setting them off... That and it's very easy to procure them with aid grants from western nations when sanctions prevent military imports. The only way I see museum pieces being viable is in portions of the former USSR or in western nations. In the ME, Africa, SW Asia, they're too valuable as scrap to become pieces or they are too costly to do anything but abandon (like multiple African nation's airports currently hosting mouldering aircraft husks).
Keep in mind that in the 90's Africa, Southeast Asia and the Middle East were loaded with still very active "museum pieces" - the list of armies that still operated old WWII and early Cold War tanks and armored cars would be very extensive indeed - the last 20 years have seen many of them retired but in 1995 you have a lot of that equipment still in use. So dont count them out.

Also keep in mind just in Italy there are literally hundreds of old M47 tanks with plenty of spares in storage that were leased from the US Army.

And if you are looking at V1 there would be even more of such tanks and armored vehicles still around and still in running shape - i.e. the era of the US and Soviets sending stuff like that to countries like Kenya, Tanzania, Israel, Syria, etc. would still be very much in action

I also think that even a "Potemkin" tank has a lot of value - i.e. how many marauders are going to see a tank and decide that they want to take it on - not knowing that its basically immobile and may not have a working fire control system. Its one thing if its somewhere that has anti-tank weapons - its another if you are talking a bunch of guys with shotguns and hunting rifles seeing a tank and have nothing but some dynamite or a flaming bottle of gas to try to take it out with. Most would give it a wide berth.
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  #48  
Old 06-03-2021, 10:00 AM
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For discussion of the plausibility and/or utility of using museum pieces in modern warfare, please use the following thread:

https://forum.juhlin.com/showthread.php?t=4600

This thread is about obsolescent (not yet obsolete) weapons, which were in national militaries' reserve stockpiles, that would see front-line action at some point in the Twilight War.

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  #49  
Old 06-03-2021, 10:08 AM
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The question is what would be a museum piece - that would depend on the country. The Soviets and Russians were still using T-34 tanks for driver training well into the 1990's - whereas in the US the comparable tank, the Sherman, by then was 100% a museum piece.

In Mexico and Paraguay they were still using Stuart tanks into the period of the timeline - here those are museum pieces. There they were active duty tanks.

So it may have to be something you would look at on a country to country basis as to what would be a museum piece. Keep in mind there are active duty T-34's still in several country's armies and that in the 90's you could encounter M-47 tanks in service in Turkey, Iran, Croatia, Pakistan and South Korea and in reserve storage in Italy.

And Austria has a lot of old tank turrets being used for bunkers - so while you wont run into the tank you could very easily run into the still very operational turret and its armament

Perfect example is the Ferret APC - its still in use in a lot of countries - so while some would call it a museum piece others would call it very much obsolescent but still operational.
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  #50  
Old 06-03-2021, 10:22 AM
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The question is what would be a museum piece - that would depend on the country.
Yes, but as you pointed out, if it a vehicle is in a military's reserve stock, for the purposes of this thread, it is not a museum piece (yet).

If a particular vehicle is actually on display at a museum, it is a museum piece.

Feel free to discuss the former here; please discuss the latter in the previously referenced and linked Littlefield Collection thread.

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  #51  
Old 06-03-2021, 10:29 AM
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Yes, but as you pointed out, if it a vehicle is in a military's reserve stock, for the purposes of this thread, it is not a museum piece (yet).

If a particular vehicle is actually on display at a museum, it is a museum piece.

Feel free to discuss the former here; please discuss the latter in the previously referenced and linked Littlefield Collection thread.

-
You got it - and as I said that is dependent on the country. So that offers a great way to pull out the rare older vehicle to surprise players. "What the heck I thought all the (fill in the blank with Ferrets, T-34's, M47's) went to the boneyard a lot time ago?"

And the answer is yes they did - but not in Croatia or Greece or Turkey or Africa

By the way that is one reason the East Africa and Korea areas are such a great place to campaign - not only because of the re-enactor unit in Kenya but precisely because so many obsolescent vehicles are still being used that can be used to challenge the players with and not just the same tanks, BMP's, etc.
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  #52  
Old 06-03-2021, 12:00 PM
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Interesting to note that a lot of weapon systems were still in service or buried in some forgotten corner of some warehouse someplace. Examples -
1) Some friends cleaning out a warehouse found a crate of unissued Springfield Model 1884 rifled muskets in 1996.
2) T-34/85s could still be found in Russian training units and Machine Gun Divisions in the Far East in 1990.
3) Approximately 50 M60A2s were still in US POMCUS warehouses in 1990 as well as un-updated M60A1s.
4) MG34 and MG42 machineguns were in East German police and militia armories at reunification.
5) French police still have German G43s rifles in armories.
6) Norway still has MP40s SMGs in its militia armories.
7) German STG44s were captured in Iraq in 2003.
8) Up till about 1994, there were still M1 Carbines maintained in US armories.
9) Many US police agencies still possess M1928 Thompsons in their armories.

In my campaign, I have a fully operational M60A2 that was pulled out of a museum in a CIVGOV unit.
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Old 06-03-2021, 01:17 PM
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Raellus Raellus is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mpipes View Post
Interesting to note that a lot of weapon systems were still in service or buried in some forgotten corner of some warehouse someplace. Examples -
1) Some friends cleaning out a warehouse found a crate of unissued Springfield Model 1884 rifled muskets in 1996.
2) T-34/85s could still be found in Russian training units and Machine Gun Divisions in the Far East in 1990.
3) Approximately 50 M60A2s were still in US POMCUS warehouses in 1990 as well as un-updated M60A1s.
4) MG34 and MG42 machineguns were in East German police and militia armories at reunification.
5) French police still have German G43s rifles in armories.
6) Norway still has MP40s SMGs in its militia armories.
7) German STG44s were captured in Iraq in 2003.
8) Up till about 1994, there were still M1 Carbines maintained in US armories.
9) Many US police agencies still possess M1928 Thompsons in their armories.
Thanks, MPipes. Those are exactly the kinds of things I'm hoping to catalogue here.

Re #7, according to Wikipedia...

"The Sturmgewehr remained in use with the East German Nationale Volksarmee with the designation MPi.44 until it was eventually replaced with domestic variants of the AK-47 assault rifle. The Volkspolizei used it until approximately 1962 when it was replaced by the PPSh-41. It was still used by other public security formations thereafter.[24] The ammunition was manufactured there at least until 1961.[24] Other countries to use the StG 44 after World War II included Czechoslovakia (although it was not officially adopted)[24] and Yugoslavia, where units such as the 63rd Paratroop Battalion were equipped with it until the 1980s,[25] when the rifles were ultimately transferred to Territorial Defense reserves or sold to friendly regimes in the Middle East and Africa. France adopted captured StG 44 for colonial Foreign Legion units."

And, apparently, it is still produced today in Germany as a sporting rifle, both in the original caliber and in .22 rimfire.

So, one could expect to find examples of the StG 44 scattered about during the Twilight War.

In addition to previous examples, Romanian Patriotic Guard troops were equipped with MG-34s until at least the 1970s.

I also reckon that one would frequently encounter PPSh-41s and PPS-43 SMGs in East Bloc militia/irregular/deep reserve units come 2000.

-
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Last edited by Raellus; 06-03-2021 at 01:58 PM.
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Old 06-03-2021, 04:51 PM
Vespers War Vespers War is offline
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I also reckon that one would frequently encounter PPSh-41s and PPS-43 SMGs in East Bloc militia/irregular/deep reserve units come 2000.

-
Both the PPSh-41 and PPS were used at the start of the current Ukrainian unpleasantness, so they would definitely still be around in any of the existing Twilight War timelines. They might also appear in Africa and East Asia, based on the users and former users listed on Wikipedia.
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Old 06-03-2021, 05:08 PM
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Keep in mind this is current data on the T-34 tank as of 2020

Current
Cuba: 642 supplier - undisclosed number in service.
Bosnia-Herzegovina: 5
Republic of the Congo: In reserve.
Guinea: 30 still operational
Guinea-Bissau: 10
Namibia: 4 (in reserve)
North Korea: 650 - undisclosed number in service
Yemen: 30 operational
Vietnam: 45 in service as a trainer
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Old 06-03-2021, 05:30 PM
3catcircus 3catcircus is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Olefin View Post
Keep in mind this is current data on the T-34 tank as of 2020

Current
Cuba: 642 supplier - undisclosed number in service.
Bosnia-Herzegovina: 5
Republic of the Congo: In reserve.
Guinea: 30 still operational
Guinea-Bissau: 10
Namibia: 4 (in reserve)
North Korea: 650 - undisclosed number in service
Yemen: 30 operational
Vietnam: 45 in service as a trainer
It's much more likely for small arms to be available from bygone eras than artillery, armor, etc. It's just way too costly to maintain a fleet of reserve tanks or ships or airplanes. A rifle is easy - coat in grease, wrap in oilskin, and pack away.

The Boneyard in AZ or the reserve fleet in Philly are examples of wishful thinking, for example - to maintain hardware, you either have to spend the time and effort to maintain it ready-to-go (in which case why bother if you have a front-line set of kit but no guard or reserve troops to use and maintain the old kit) or you have to do so much layup to prepare it for long term storage that it'll take months (or longer) to make it serviceable.

I think that is the key - in order to have antiquated weaponry that isn't a true museum display piece that can actually be used, having reservists or guardsmen type troops to continue using it is necessary.
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Old 06-03-2021, 05:40 PM
Olefin Olefin is offline
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Originally Posted by 3catcircus View Post
It's much more likely for small arms to be available from bygone eras than artillery, armor, etc. It's just way too costly to maintain a fleet of reserve tanks or ships or airplanes. A rifle is easy - coat in grease, wrap in oilskin, and pack away.

The Boneyard in AZ or the reserve fleet in Philly are examples of wishful thinking, for example - to maintain hardware, you either have to spend the time and effort to maintain it ready-to-go (in which case why bother if you have a front-line set of kit but no guard or reserve troops to use and maintain the old kit) or you have to do so much layup to prepare it for long term storage that it'll take months (or longer) to make it serviceable.
Oh the rifles and other small arms will be in great profusion - the armor/artillery/armored cars etc. are more to show, as per Raellus question, what kind of obsolescent vehicles will be seen in the T2K timeline.

I.e. what might get pulled out of reserve, etc.. and find itself fighting on the battlefields as modern armor gets short

I recommend an excellent book you might like - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Te...aeli_War:_1999 - very relevant to the topic - shows the US having to use old Lee, Sherman and Stuart tanks when the modern armor they had broke down

And I disagree with you on maintaining hardware - many of the older tanks are still in operation precisely because they are so easy to maintain. That guy in my town who owned the Sherman kept it going with a backyard garage and tools he bought from Sears and spare parts that in some cases he improvised from old service manuals he had.

Compared to the marvels of modern tech we operate now they may still be going long after the Twilight War ends due to their simplicity and still be fighting on battlefields when the last M1A1 has finally broken down for the last time.
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Old 06-03-2021, 06:34 PM
3catcircus 3catcircus is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Olefin View Post
Oh the rifles and other small arms will be in great profusion - the armor/artillery/armored cars etc. are more to show, as per Raellus question, what kind of obsolescent vehicles will be seen in the T2K timeline.

I.e. what might get pulled out of reserve, etc.. and find itself fighting on the battlefields as modern armor gets short

I recommend an excellent book you might like - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Te...aeli_War:_1999 - very relevant to the topic - shows the US having to use old Lee, Sherman and Stuart tanks when the modern armor they had broke down

And I disagree with you on maintaining hardware - many of the older tanks are still in operation precisely because they are so easy to maintain. That guy in my town who owned the Sherman kept it going with a backyard garage and tools he bought from Sears and spare parts that in some cases he improvised from old service manuals he had.

Compared to the marvels of modern tech we operate now they may still be going long after the Twilight War ends due to their simplicity and still be fighting on battlefields when the last M1A1 has finally broken down for the last time.
It's not that they may be easier to maintain, technology-wise. It's that they require so much more of it the older they get. It's easy to troubleshoot and replace an LRU on new kit. When you have to half-step down to the circuit card or the mechanical subassembly and then physically repair it, it is infinitely more difficult and time-consuming, even if the equipment is easier to understand and repairs can be done with a screwdriver and wrench but takes 4 hrs instead of 15 minutes - when you have a fleet of vehicles you are maintaining.
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Old 06-04-2021, 12:56 PM
mpipes mpipes is offline
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Forgot to mention that the Soviets stored THOUSANDS of captured German weapons at least through the 1990s. A friend was shown one salt mine in the Ukraine in the mid 90s storing WWII captured weapons. He personally saw and inspected crates of Lugers, P38s, G43s, K98s, MP-40s, and MG34s and 42s. All of them were in extremely good condition and fully functional. The Russians also had all the Thompson SMGs received with their lend lease Sherman tanks in storage, and many of those parts kits after the receivers were demilled were imported in the 90s and early 00s.
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Old 06-07-2021, 07:33 AM
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Articles about the Vietnam War but may interest:
https://wwiiafterwwii.wordpress.com/...e-vietnam-war/
https://www.warhistoryonline.com/ins...s-vietnam.html
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