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  #61  
Old 10-31-2013, 08:22 PM
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I had a few thoughts....

One has anyone ever seen the show hoarders? Now most of these people on the show hoard garbage and junk not fit to be around but some of them hoard things like Books and tools. My old boss legitimately was a firearms, ammunition and accessories hoarder. Some people hoard canned food and batteries and household goods useful things to the end of world traveler. My moms house is a mixture of all the above!

The second thought was Liberty tool shed and captain Tinkhams.....two real places here in Maine that have nothing but antique tools and farm equipment!!!!

I read that John Denver was a gas hoarder in the 1970's had several underground tanks full of gasoline/petrol on his property.

Perhaps these are all easy ideas and there could be something more bizzare but also useful.....

what about a place with functioning hot water? Say a farm house with a wood boiler and gravity feed water tank (not that uncommon here in the north east)

ill think of more soon
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  #62  
Old 10-31-2013, 09:06 PM
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Hoarding books...I'm guilty.

My mother calls me a hoarder, but I don't think I'm that far gone. But perhaps my biggest aspect of hoarding is computer parts and files. I have some old RAM in my closet that wouldn't fit in any computer made for quite some time now. And I have files that I wrote on my first computer in 1991 (just converted into something readable by today's programs), and some of the JPGs have been on one of my computers since the beginning.

A lot of time, these things become useful. It's not hoarding -- I know where to look for everything.
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  #63  
Old 11-09-2013, 04:32 PM
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My mother tends to hoard. Its irrational. She keeps unopened bank statements from like 15 years ago, receipts that are decades old, etc. Not very useful in a T2K sense. Aside from a nice source of paper to start a fire with.
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  #64  
Old 06-03-2016, 12:09 AM
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Default Functional uses for "useless" items

While not a "private" stash, there are a few things mentioned in passing in the Allegheny Uprising strategic reserve that might actually turn out more valuable than at first glance.
--Crates of DoD and tax forms; lots of paper, which, if densely compressed, will slow down projectiles if the reserve's location becomes a combat zone. Also useful with moderate treatment (soaked with water and dried) as toilet paper. Not great but better than leaves, brother. Perhaps also useful if soaked in water, rolled tightly and bound into 11-inch-long "logs", dried, then soaked in waste fat/oil for erszatz firewood. And finally, as a source of information about the addresses of small businesses that might have hidden/abandoned resources nearby that could be used in the recovery efforts.
--Crates of oil pipeline xrays, which are negatives. Which contain lots and lots of recoverable _silver_. Also, the filmstock itself might come in handy to water proof small items, or as sunglass lenses.
More as they occur to me.
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  #65  
Old 06-03-2016, 12:28 PM
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I think that might be where they filmed Dawn of the Dead - certainly a facility something like that.
No. Dawn of the Dead was filmed at the Monroeville Mall. They even refer to it (the zombies swarm the mall due to some bearly-remembered instinct for shopping).

I (along with a dozen friends, awake at stupid o'clock in the morning on different Sat nights/Sunday mornings) was one of the extras, but near as I can see I ended up on the cutting room floor.

Uncle Ted
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  #66  
Old 06-03-2016, 01:00 PM
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Coke requires kola beans which do not grow in non-tropical environments, generally; however, some are cultivated in northern italy or southern germany, according to this map:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...lanutYield.png

Also note a crapton are grown in central southern California, but well enough away from LA that they might not be fallout contaminated.

What was the yield of weapons used on and around that region?

We can use nukemap to maybe determine what the crops would be like...

Also: I had a character (didn't get to play, unfortunately) among his treasures was a 12 pack of canned coke.
Are you pushing for actual Cola Wars?

Picture a mad-eyed senior officer....

"Dammit, major! My men will need to have heart to push those dammned Mexicans out of California! They'll need the promise of Coke! Served by cute American girls in short shorts! Your battalion WILL take that area this week, and secure the area until the harvest is complete!."

Uncle Ted
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  #67  
Old 06-03-2016, 01:43 PM
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Default Iron Mountain

I used to work for Iron Mountain about 12 years ago.

In addition to tons of paper records (government & corporate), there are private physical storage areas, with anything from photo albums to sets of china (these are rare, because access is difficult and the storage is expensive - but then, what is there is probabaly of value - or was of value before TDM and nuclear war.

There (is) also a (very) large data center, designed to hold corporate (and government) electronic data. While the data may be of limited value, you will get a large functioning data center in a place specifically designed NOT to be damaged by natural and unnatural disasters, including nuclear attack, and is not near a specific target. The computers, of course, can be re-purposed, and corporate finance and operations records for a few hundred randomly selected US Fortune 5000 corporations deleted (heck, its available on back-up anyway).

Uncle Ted
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  #68  
Old 06-03-2016, 02:54 PM
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Just for entertainment...Try surfing some of the survival food web sites, the claims and counterclaims can be amusing. Although the five gallon plastic buckets holding four weeks of food for one person are intriguing...
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  #69  
Old 06-07-2016, 02:22 PM
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Default Ugly Sweaters

A trunkful (or suitcase or storage box) of particularly ugly sweaters, part of collection of that which should not be worn: bright, clashing colors, peculiar shades, decorated with elves, trees, moose, reindeer, big red hearts, badly rendered ice skaters, large silvery stars, etc.

There could be matching socks in the bottom.

Found in an attic or basement in November in a northern climate. (Last folk passing through in summer did not need or want them them).

You can provide a clue by having a shredded sweater on the stairs leading to the rest. "Is that a smurf?"

Uncle Ted
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  #70  
Old 06-07-2016, 02:55 PM
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Have the team exploring an abandoned house, and finding a hatch in the backyard. Exploring the hatch leads to a bomb shelter...packed of U.S. Civil Defence supplies, nothing like 50-year old canned water and enriched crackers for dinner. Would that be a +5 for the upchoke roll!
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  #71  
Old 06-09-2016, 05:28 PM
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Slightly off the road, your PCs find a set of trailers, slightly weathered.

On further examination, these are carnival rides, abandoned by the trucks that towed them a years or two back. Some rides have been plundered, in that seats or some decorations are missing.

With some persistence (if the ride is opened up), some of the rides have their own generator or engine - each with 0-50L of gasoline (2D6-2 x 5) that can be siphoned out.

Uncle Ted
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  #72  
Old 06-13-2016, 12:04 PM
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<Snip>
On further examination, these are carnival rides, abandoned by the trucks that towed them a years or two back. Some rides have been plundered, in that seats or some decorations are missing.

With some persistence (if the ride is opened up), some of the rides have their own generator or engine - each with 0-50L of gasoline (2D6-2 x 5) that can be siphoned out.

Uncle Ted
Some of them also have hydraulics, from which might be siphoned the fluid. That is if you're not going to salvage the systems themselves.
You never know when you might need an MG/periscope on an extension arm.
Might also be handy equipped with a rake or hook attachment to try to remove objects without getting too close (AP mines).
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  #73  
Old 06-13-2016, 12:56 PM
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Visiting a friends house, who runs the local civil war living history unit, and his arms room got me thinking...a 12pdr Napoleon, a dozen Springfield and Enfield rifle muskets, Spencer rifles and carbine, Colt and Remington cap and ball revolvers, sabers, bayonets, enough to field a company.

Amazing what one can find in the Deep South!
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  #74  
Old 06-13-2016, 04:27 PM
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Originally Posted by dragoon500ly View Post
Visiting a friends house, who runs the local civil war living history unit, and his arms room got me thinking...a 12pdr Napoleon, a dozen Springfield and Enfield rifle muskets, Spencer rifles and carbine, Colt and Remington cap and ball revolvers, sabers, bayonets, enough to field a company.
The Napoleon is the prize here, followed by the rifles and revolvers. The Spencers are going to have the same problem faced by the Southerners who captured them--once the rimfire ammo's gone, it's a fancy club.
The Napoleon, though, could take out soft-skinned vehicles and make a APC think twice. IIRC some ACW artillerists live-fire their weapons with appropriately-diametered food cans filled with cement. One wonders what would happen if a nice hardened steel spike is centered along the long axis of the projectile?
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  #75  
Old 06-13-2016, 04:41 PM
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The Napoleon is the prize here, followed by the rifles and revolvers. The Spencers are going to have the same problem faced by the Southerners who captured them--once the rimfire ammo's gone, it's a fancy club.
The Napoleon, though, could take out soft-skinned vehicles and make a APC think twice. IIRC some ACW artillerists live-fire their weapons with appropriately-diametered food cans filled with cement. One wonders what would happen if a nice hardened steel spike is centered along the long axis of the projectile?
While I generally agree with you on the cannon, I think the black powder pistols and rifles will be more useful and the caps are a pretty easy fix. The better (more useful?) use for those food cans is to fill them with stones or scrap metal fragments and just bend the top back down. They fragment wonderfully upon impact.
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  #76  
Old 06-13-2016, 04:51 PM
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The Napoleon is the prize here, followed by the rifles and revolvers. The Spencers are going to have the same problem faced by the Southerners who captured them--once the rimfire ammo's gone, it's a fancy club.
The Napoleon, though, could take out soft-skinned vehicles and make a APC think twice. IIRC some ACW artillerists live-fire their weapons with appropriately-diametered food cans filled with cement. One wonders what would happen if a nice hardened steel spike is centered along the long axis of the projectile?
I do know that this has been used to fire grapeshot and canister as well as solid shot as part of an archeological research project, copies of artillery manuals from the Civil War showing to make shells and fuses, and several members claim they can manufacture the same, so I can see certain possibilities. This is part a battery in lower Mississippi and eastern Louisiana and they have access to another Napoleon, a 12pdr mountain howitizer, a 6pdr field gun and a 12pdr Cohorn mortar. So enough guns to defend a small town.
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  #77  
Old 06-13-2016, 04:59 PM
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Also, note that the carriage on that Napoleon can be removed and the gun placed on a more "modern" mount. There would be no problem mounting that on the back of a 5-ton flatbed using the parts of a light truck suspension to mount the gun without damaging the truck or the gun. In fact, I'm willing to bet there's a "Technical" out there with just such an arrangement.
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  #78  
Old 06-13-2016, 06:30 PM
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Also, note that the carriage on that Napoleon can be removed and the gun placed on a more "modern" mount. There would be no problem mounting that on the back of a 5-ton flatbed using the parts of a light truck suspension to mount the gun without damaging the truck or the gun. In fact, I'm willing to bet there's a "Technical" out there with just such an arrangement.
One wonders how much more beneficial a recoil mechanism would be for accuracy. Of course a soup can packed with 6d nails or heavy staples (heh,heh), or even barbs clipped from barbed wire (suitably rusty, of course), would most definitely have a beneficially adverse effect on enemy morale.
Hmmmm....soup can with razor wire coiled inside it....?
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Old 06-13-2016, 07:39 PM
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[QUOTE=WallShadow;71287]One wonders how much more beneficial a recoil mechanism would be for accuracy. Of course a soup can packed with 6d nails or heavy staples (heh,heh), or even barbs clipped from barbed wire (suitably rusty, of course), would most definitely have a beneficially adverse effect on enemy morale.
Hmmmm....soup can with razor wire coiled inside

Soup cans are a tad small in a diameter, coffee cans are normally used, stuff one full of musket balls and you have canister, pour concrete and let one set, you have solid shot.

The artillery manuals also all kinds of useful info like how to make illumination and incendiary rounds as well.
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  #80  
Old 06-14-2016, 04:21 AM
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Not an odd treasure trove, more an odd place to find certain things...

In regards to finding firearms for scenarios set in the United Kingdom (and for almost anywhere else really), there is one source of civilian firearms that doesn't get much attention... zoos/wildlife parks.

In many countries, operators of these facilities have an obligation to protect the public should a dangerous animal escape and for some, one option is to deploy their own armed response teams.
Zoos/wildlife parks are by no means very common but aside from people going there to kill the animals for food or find vehicles, construction supplies etc. etc., how many people would raid a zoo thinking it has firearms locked away somewhere?

For some more info, The Firearms Blog has this page,
http://www.thefirearmblog.com/blog/2...irearm+Blog%29
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  #81  
Old 06-14-2016, 10:38 AM
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[QUOTE=dragoon500ly;71289]
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One wonders how much more beneficial a recoil mechanism would be for accuracy. Of course a soup can packed with 6d nails or heavy staples (heh,heh), or even barbs clipped from barbed wire (suitably rusty, of course), would most definitely have a beneficially adverse effect on enemy morale.
Hmmmm....soup can with razor wire coiled inside

Soup cans are a tad small in a diameter, coffee cans are normally used, stuff one full of musket balls and you have canister, pour concrete and let one set, you have solid shot.

The artillery manuals also all kinds of useful info like how to make illumination and incendiary rounds as well.
Two small Campbells soup cans can be loaded into a ("roughly") 120mm bore side by side. You must lightly crimp them but they fit. The coffee can must be lightly crimped as well. However, the coffee can will have a reduced range because of the weight of the shot load (or will require a larger powder charge which can be dangerous). The IDEAL canister round is a Bondo/body putty canister. It fits nicely inside a 12 pounder and is short enough in height to not produce an overweight shot charge.
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  #82  
Old 06-14-2016, 01:32 PM
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[QUOTE=swaghauler;71292]
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Originally Posted by dragoon500ly View Post

Two small Campbells soup cans can be loaded into a ("roughly") 120mm bore side by side. You must lightly crimp them but they fit. The coffee can must be lightly crimped as well. However, the coffee can will have a reduced range because of the weight of the shot load (or will require a larger powder charge which can be dangerous). The IDEAL canister round is a Bondo/body putty canister. It fits nicely inside a 12 pounder and is short enough in height to not produce an overweight shot charge.
Mighty funny how someone would already know this, as if they'd tried it for real....
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  #83  
Old 06-14-2016, 07:19 PM
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[QUOTE=WallShadow;71294]
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Mighty funny how someone would already know this, as if they'd tried it for real....
I try to get my sweaty mitts on every kind of weapon where ever I can (the REASON I joined the artillery...can you find a bigger gun to shoot?). I have been a party to "experiments with muzzle loading cannon" from time to time.

I cannot wait for D-Day Conneaut OH this August. I love the German 88mm, the Russian 76mm, the half dozen 37mm AT guns, and the 3 or 4 US 75mm Pack howitzers. The tanks are cool too but they won't let me play with those guns....
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  #84  
Old 06-15-2016, 01:32 PM
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The Napoleon is the prize here, followed by the rifles and revolvers. The Spencers are going to have the same problem faced by the Southerners who captured them--once the rimfire ammo's gone, it's a fancy club.
The Napoleon, though, could take out soft-skinned vehicles and make a APC think twice. IIRC some ACW artillerists live-fire their weapons with appropriately-diametered food cans filled with cement. One wonders what would happen if a nice hardened steel spike is centered along the long axis of the projectile?
The original AP ammo was called a bolt, and was a solid chunk of cylindrical iron (as opposed to a ball). However, a bolt was usually fired from a rifled gun (ex: Union 20-lb or 30-lb (3"-4' diam approx) Parrott Rifle, as opposed to a smooth-bore Napoleon). The spin kept the bolt end-on to the target, and it decelerated less quickly than a ball. (So a cement-filled can is not as strange a projectile as it might seem.)

With some hardened steel chisels, a blacksmith and a woodshop, you could probably make some crude APDS.

With a little research, you could also make cannister - a cylinder filled with small lead balls (or a collection of 1/4 - 1/2-in nuts and short bolts) that splits apart as it leaves the barrel, making a giant shotgun. Other than only being deployable at close range, it would be effective against infantry. Reload time is kind of slow.

Uncle Ted
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  #85  
Old 06-16-2016, 07:19 AM
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With a little research, you could also make cannister - a cylinder filled with small lead balls (or a collection of 1/4 - 1/2-in nuts and short bolts) that splits apart as it leaves the barrel, making a giant shotgun. Other than only being deployable at close range, it would be effective against infantry. Reload time is kind of slow.

Uncle Ted
As I recall, ships (and even castles) of the gunpowder era where often fitted with swivel guns for pretty much that same purpose - a short range anti-personnel weapon.

For those who haven't heard about them, a swivel gun is basically a small canon on a swiveling mount to allow wide arc of movement, filled with grapeshot to help repel enemies attempting to board the ship (or castle).
Again, reload time is slow but you can mitigate that somewhat by having multiple swivel guns in the same place so that one (or more) are available while the first gun is reloading.
The main point here is that you can get multiple swivel guns for the cost of a single larger cannon and they have a greater range of movement as well as being much faster to move.
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Old 06-16-2016, 03:43 PM
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As I recall, ships (and even castles) of the gunpowder era where often fitted with swivel guns for pretty much that same purpose - a short range anti-personnel weapon.

For those who haven't heard about them, a swivel gun is basically a small canon on a swiveling mount to allow wide arc of movement, filled with grapeshot to help repel enemies attempting to board the ship (or castle).
Again, reload time is slow but you can mitigate that somewhat by having multiple swivel guns in the same place so that one (or more) are available while the first gun is reloading.
The main point here is that you can get multiple swivel guns for the cost of a single larger cannon and they have a greater range of movement as well as being much faster to move.
Also, keep in mind that swivel guns being black powder and generally of small caliber do not necessarily fall under the guidelines of either the NFA (National Firearms Act of 1934) or under the Gun Control Act of 1968 which makes them very easy to acquire legally. This means that they can still be made (as "replica firearms") unlike larger caliber BP cannon (which are "Destructive Devices" under NFA). That alone would see them "pressed into service" during the Twilight War. Even today, a large number of sailors have small BP swivel guns as "saluting guns" or just for fun on the decks of their ships.
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Old 06-16-2016, 04:16 PM
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Also, keep in mind that swivel guns being black powder and generally of small caliber do not necessarily fall under the guidelines of either the NFA (National Firearms Act of 1934) or under the Gun Control Act of 1968 which makes them very easy to acquire legally. This means that they can still be made (as "replica firearms") unlike larger caliber BP cannon (which are "Destructive Devices" under NFA). That alone would see them "pressed into service" during the Twilight War. Even today, a large number of sailors have small BP swivel guns as "saluting guns" or just for fun on the decks of their ships.
I own two and have "made" several others. We have used all manor of "tubes" from drill rod ( Oil field type) to 20 mm up to 40mm cut offs from decomished tubes. I like them better then some of the cast reproduction guns.
Not hard and as you say very legit.
As to speed, that is another thing I can reload a 24"(long) swivel in less time than it takes for the smoke ta clear. Laugh< which in calm weather is a bit.
I have used them in many rendezvous and ren fair locations and at the Highland games here in Estes park.
we use blank and cast .45 most times and have done the canester and loose loads.
I have made black powder ( some years ago) and it is not [U]too[U] hard but some what dangerious. sic the best carbon being from willow we found.
Oh well my 2 cents once more
harry O
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Old 06-20-2016, 02:29 PM
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Not an odd treasure trove, more an odd place to find certain things...
<SNIP>
Zoos/wildlife parks are by no means very common but aside from people going there to kill the animals for food or find vehicles, construction supplies etc. etc., how many people would raid a zoo thinking it has firearms locked away somewhere? <SNIP>
Having just done a very short search online, an obvious (in retrospect) opportunity to obtain firearms and ammo would be at several of the smaller private military academies . I searched a couple and found references to "rifle range" "rifle team" and photos of cadets in formation, some with '03 Springfields, some with M-14s. A rifle range, especially one located underground, would not be readily recognized, and, since the student were most likely home for the holidays, they would not have necessarily been able to access it. Not to mention the treasure-as-trade-in only-fired-once brass awaiting disposal, and expended lead in the backstops that might be used to produce more ammo.
Orrrrrrr....Assume a cadre of students and instructors remained at, or returned to, the academy, with its dining hall supplies, firing range weapons and ammo, "Taps", anyone?
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Old 06-21-2016, 04:05 PM
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Default Hobby Store "Heavy Weapons" and "Drones."

When considering the manufacture of heavy weapons one cannot forget the radio-controlled planes/cars and model rockets you can find in hobby shops. Explosives-laden radio-controlled vehicles can be used as a "poor man's guided missile."

Model rocket launchers can easily be converted into RPGs. Many model rockets can carry payloads and the explosive "micro charge" in most rocket motors (which is used to deploy a parachute) can be strengthened with flash powder to boost its power for igniting an explosive charge.

The electrical ignition system (using a 9-volt battery) can easily be modified into a launcher by simply attaching it to a steel tube, thus creating a "makeshift RPG-16."
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  #90  
Old 06-22-2016, 08:07 AM
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Originally Posted by WallShadow View Post
"Taps", anyone?
A sadly under-rated movie and while I don't know how much firepower a military academy like the one shown in the movie would be likely to have, it would still be a potential resource for items such as beds, bed linen, books, household cleaning supplies (I'm thinking particularly about bulk supplies of bleach), clothing supplies (even though they may be smaller sizes the material could be reused to make clothes for adults), even toilet paper and possibly bulk fuel for generators, lawn mowers, academy motor vehicles and so on.

Assuming the academy is out of the way and hasn't been cleared out by any government agency of course.
I think a typical high school/academy would have too much "uninteresting" loot for scavengers to bother with but it's the type of stuff that groups looking to rebuild could be interested in. Obviously a military academy is going to be interesting because of the potential for "military loot" but I think that that would result in most raiders leaving items that would be useful for rebuilding - I'd assume they'd be after guns, food and fuel and wouldn't bother with the gear I've mentioned above.
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