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Old 07-10-2009, 05:43 AM
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Default Burma in T2K

After seeing episode 2 of The Philantropist (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1217208/)(prettygood series I must say)..It got me thinking about how States like Burma would cope with the fall of civilization...since they allmost have lost it allready...with all the forced labour in ruby-mines and whatnot....

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burma

Burma's Foreign relations and Military:
The country's foreign relations, particularly with Western nations, have been strained. The United States has placed a ban on new investments by U.S. firms, an import ban, and an arms embargo on the Union of Myanmar, as well as frozen military assets in the United States because of the military regime's ongoing human rights abuses, the ongoing detention of Nobel Peace Prize recipient Aung San Suu Kyi, and refusal to honor the election results of the 1990 People's Assembly election.[96] Similarly, the European Union has placed sanctions on Burma, including an arms embargo, cessation of trade preferences, and suspension of all aid with the exception of humanitarian aid.[97] U.S. and European government sanctions against the military government, coupled with boycotts and other direct pressure on corporations by western supporters of the democracy movement, have resulted in the withdrawal from the country of most U.S. and many European companies. However, several Western companies remain due to loopholes in the sanctions.

Despite Western isolation, Asian corporations have generally remained willing to continue investing in the country and to initiate new investments, particularly in natural resource extraction. The country has close relations with neighboring India and China with several Indian and Chinese companies operating in the country. There remains active debate as to the extent to which the American-led sanctions have had adverse effects on the civilian population or on the military rulers.[98][99] Burma has also received extensive military aid from India and China in the past.[100] According to some estimates, Burma has received more than US$200 million in military aid from India.[101] Under India's Look East policy, fields of cooperation between India and Burma include remote sensing,[102] oil and gas exploration,(possible nuke targets)[103] information technology,[104] hydro power[105] and construction of ports and buildings.[106] In 2008, India suspended military aid to Burma over the issue of human rights abuses by the ruling junta, although it has preserved extensive commercial ties which provide the regime with much needed revenue.[107]

The country's armed forces are known as the Tatmadaw, which numbers 488,000. The Tatmadaw comprises the Army, the Navy, and the Air Force. The country ranked twelfth in the world for its number of active troops in service.[15] The military is very influential in the country, with top cabinet and ministry posts held by military officers. Official figures for military spending are not available. Estimates vary widely because of uncertain exchange rates, but military spending is very high.[108] The country imports most of its weapons from Russia, Ukraine, China and India.

The country is building a research nuclear reactor near May Myo (Pyin Oo Lwin) with help from Russia. It is one of the signatories of the nuclear non-proliferation pact since 1992 and a member of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) since 1957. The military junta had informed the IAEA in September 2000 of its intention to construct the reactor. The research reactor outbuilding frame was built by ELE steel industries limited of Yangon and water from Anisakhan/BE water fall will be used for the reactor cavity cooling system.

ASEAN will not defend the country in any international forum following the military regime's refusal to restore democracy. In April 2007, the Malaysian Foreign Ministry parliamentary secretary Ahmad Shabery Cheek said Malaysia and other ASEAN members had decided not to defend Burma if the country's issue was raised for discussion at any international conference. "Now Myanmar has to defend itself if it is bombarded in any international forum," he said when winding up a debate at committee stage for the Foreign Ministry. He was replying to queries from opposition leader Lim Kit Siang on the next course of action to be taken by Malaysia and ASEAN with the military junta. Lim had said Malaysia must play a proactive role in pursuing regional initiatives to bring about a change in Burma and support efforts to bring the situation in Burma to the UN Security Council's attention.[109] In November 2008, Burma's political situation with neighboring Bangladesh became tense as they began searching for natural gas in a disputed block of the Bay of Bengal.[110]

Until 2005, the United Nations General Assembly annually adopted a detailed resolution about the situation in Burma by consensus.[111][111][112][113][114] But in 2006 a divided United Nations General Assembly voted through a resolution that strongly called upon the government of Burma to end its systematic violations of human rights.[115] In January 2007, Russia and China vetoed a draft resolution before the United Nations Security Council[116] calling on the government of Myanmar to respect human rights and begin a democratic transition. South Africa also voted against the resolution.[117]

The country is a corner of the Golden Triangle of opium production. In 1996 the United States Embassy in Rangoon released a "Country Commercial Guide", which states "Exports of opiates alone appear to be worth about as much as all legal exports." It goes on to say that investments in infrastructure and hotels are coming from major opiate-growing and opiate-exporting organizations and from those with close ties to these organizations.[118] A four-year investigation concluded that Burma's national company Myanma Oil and Gas Enterprise (MOGE) was "the main channel for laundering the revenues of heroin produced and exported under the control of the Burmese army." The main player in the country's drug market is the United Wa State Army, ethnic fighters who control areas along the country's eastern border with Thailand, part of the infamous Golden Triangle. The Wa army, an ally of Burma's ruling military junta, was once the militant arm of the Beijing-backed Burmese Communist Party. Burma has been a significant cog in the transnational drug trade since World War II.[119][120] The number of hectares used to grow the crops increased 29% in 2007. A United Nations report cites corruption, poverty and a lack of government control as causes for the jump.[121]

(from wikipedia)

more on Burma's military here: http://www.burmafund.org/pathfinders...y/Military.htm
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Last edited by kato13; 07-10-2009 at 05:54 AM.
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Old 07-10-2009, 06:01 AM
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Default Depending on when you start the end (nukes fall from the sky)

But in regards to canon this could be helpfull:
http://www.burmafund.org/pathfinders.../Preparing.htm
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Old 07-10-2009, 02:42 PM
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Burma is an interesting subject. I might not have read well all of what you wrote but I have not seen mention of the ongoing conflict there (the most forgotten one in our societies), the oldest in the world (the nobel price you mentioned is one of its leader). Since 1948, an ethnic conflict opposes the government to Karen and Shan.

That should be of some consequences in T2K.
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Old 10-21-2014, 11:56 AM
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Actually Burma could be a very interesting place to explore in T2K - especially considering the fact that you have enough canon information on Thailand to make a basis for a good campaign in the area from the Bangkok module, either using MERC or the regular game.

And considering the absolute collapse of India, Pakistan and China and how far Thailand's military has declined it could become the dominant military power in the area if the junta could hold together. And there is a good chance that their oil refineries could have been left intact.

All three are very small, with the biggest of them only able to handle 26,000 bbl/day, far below the 100,000 bbl/day that was the usual threshold for getting nuked. (Thanlyin Refinery (Myanma Petro-chemical Enterprise), 26,000 bbl/d, Thanbayakan Refinery (Myanma Petro-chemical Enterprise), 25,000 bbl/d and Chauk Refinery (Myanma Petro-chemical Enterprise), 6,000 bbl/d)


Thus you could have the combination of a large although very basically equipped military combined with just enough oil production to let them be dangerous to their neighbors
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Old 08-16-2018, 04:44 PM
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Burma in 1995 had 265,000 men in its Army, organized into ten light infantry divisions (one per regional command). There were a total of 3 armored battalions, 223 infantry battalions, 7 artillery battalions and 1 anti-aircraft battalion. They had 23 Comet tanks, 30 Chinese Type 69-II tanks and 105 Chinese T-63 light tanks as well as several hundred Type 85 APC's.

There were also two paramilitary units the People's Police Force of 50,000 men and the People's Militia of 35,000 men.

The basic maneuver and fighting unit is the battalion (or Tat Yinn in Burmese), with the majority of their troops being light infantry.

A regular infantry battalion will have a headquarters unit, five rifle companies (each with three rifle platoons), an administration company that has medical, transport, logistics and signal units, a heavy weapons company that has mortar, machine gun and recoilless rifle platoons with a total of 27 officers and 723 other ranks per establishment.

A light infantry battalion is much smaller having a total strength of only 500 men (officers and other ranks).
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Old 08-16-2018, 09:49 PM
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And it should be noted that Burma has tried to get some self-sufficiency in small arms production since the end of WW2 and particularly since the 1960s (e.g. a factory was set up later that decade to produce the G3 rifle for the Burmese military). This desire for self sufficiency became even more relevant after the arms embargo against the country in the 1990s.

Other examples; Burma started to produce localized copies of the M79 launcher some time in the 1980s-1990s (near as I can tell without doing some in-depth research) and had made copies of the Uzi as well as producing an Italian designed SMG for a short period (the TZ-45 SMG, known in Burmese service as the BA-52).

They have acquired the licence to produce various weapons but have also been producing some models that possible/probably were made without a licence agreement. For example, a new handgun being made for Burmese military/police use appears to be an unlicenced Glock copy.

Wiki has some reasonable information (I say "reasonable" because some of the articles on Burmese made weapons need some seriously improved research to get even a reasonable quantity of info, let alone quality info)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Myanmar_Army#Weapons

A better source is from the Small Arms Review magazine: -
http://www.smallarmsreview.com/displ...darticles=1154

Plus Burma had been getting technical aid & assistance from China and North Korea along with buying weapons and vehicles made by those countries. There's speculation that Burma was producing chemical weapons sometime in the late 1980s or the early 1990s and there have been accounts of chemical weapons being used against dissenting groups in the region.

Other articles worth reading: -
https://www.irrawaddy.com/opinion/gu...ets-world.html
https://www.irrawaddy.com/news/burma...oil-firms.html
http://www.eastasiaforum.org/2016/06...opium-economy/
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