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Old 01-30-2009, 01:28 AM
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Talking T2K Cuisine - Food in the aftermath

What would people eat? I guess it's all up to GM on how heavy the apoc. has been and how long ago it has happened.

I'd guess in the big (formerly big) cities rat-o-van (rat run over by a van) and the like would be possible ....or maybe the PCs will see the following sign?

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Old 01-30-2009, 02:37 AM
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In the NYC part of my current campaign Rat-On-A-Stick has proved to be a very popular dish with the locals. The funny thing is my group are mostly former Harnmaster players so we are all fully accustomed to that sort of urban snack from our Harnmaster PCs having partaken of it innumerable times.
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Old 01-30-2009, 04:57 AM
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Originally Posted by Targan
In the NYC part of my current campaign Rat-On-A-Stick has proved to be a very popular dish with the locals. The funny thing is my group are mostly former Harnmaster players so we are all fully accustomed to that sort of urban snack from our Harnmaster PCs having partaken of it innumerable times.
Before we nuked Manila in HQs Campaign we experienced the rat-on-a-stick
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Old 01-30-2009, 05:19 AM
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Default heheh

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Before we nuked Manila in HQs Campaign we experienced the rat-on-a-stick

..and you will again..

..if you are LUCKY!!
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Old 01-30-2009, 08:26 AM
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..and you will again..

..if you are LUCKY!!
hmmm...seems we have to go back to canibalism....

and in case I'm right - here is some inspiration

http://www.indiefilm.com/cookbook/en...yclopedia.html
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Old 01-30-2009, 10:12 AM
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I advise you to watch this french movie if you can find it: "Delicatessen". It's a nice idea that is perfectly relevant to canibalism in a post-apoc setting (a rare type of movie in France).

Here is the link to the english wiki on it.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delicatessen_(film)

Last edited by Mohoender; 01-30-2009 at 10:21 AM.
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Old 02-02-2009, 07:13 AM
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..and you will again..

..if you are LUCKY!!

really...we can nuke manila again.....
.aaaarghlhglglh (homer simpson sound)
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Old 05-28-2010, 02:35 PM
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Default cooking

I was wondering if anyone on the boards had tried to cookin a pit - a hole lined with stones that you fire with wood for a few hours ,and then place a parcel of meat etc in and cover with dirt to cook on the residual heat .

I hear some also place pots with lids secured inside and dig over with dirt .

Other ways of cooking outdoors or with archaic methods are also of interest.

Any information would be useful to me - I actually want to try it out for fun .
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Old 05-28-2010, 07:48 PM
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Originally Posted by headquarters View Post
I was wondering if anyone on the boards had tried to cookin a pit - a hole lined with stones that you fire with wood for a few hours ,and then place a parcel of meat etc in and cover with dirt to cook on the residual heat .

I hear some also place pots with lids secured inside and dig over with dirt .

Other ways of cooking outdoors or with archaic methods are also of interest.

Any information would be useful to me - I actually want to try it out for fun .

Yes, there are several ways. One can use a "dutch over" or similiar cast iron vessels, this is also done with hot coals. Some scout masters with a troop i work with can even bake with this method.

A person can also use crockery for cooking.

And of course using tin foil which is common, wet burlap or banana leaves.

And then of course you calso use flat stones to cook on as well.

I have had pig, fish, clams, oysters, chicken, potatoes, onions, carrots and corn cooked in this manner.

My grandfather also had a method of cooking birds, wrap them in mud/clay and cook until it drys and wait then serve. I think he picked it up durring his travels in China in the 30s.

Really alot of it is like cooking in a slow cooker, long slow low heat.
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Old 05-28-2010, 09:39 PM
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Yes, there are several ways. One can use a "dutch over" or similiar cast iron vessels, this is also done with hot coals. Some scout masters with a troop i work with can even bake with this method.

A person can also use crockery for cooking.

And of course using tin foil which is common, wet burlap or banana leaves.

And then of course you calso use flat stones to cook on as well.

I have had pig, fish, clams, oysters, chicken, potatoes, onions, carrots and corn cooked in this manner.

My grandfather also had a method of cooking birds, wrap them in mud/clay and cook until it drys and wait then serve. I think he picked it up durring his travels in China in the 30s.

Really alot of it is like cooking in a slow cooker, long slow low heat.
When I was a Scout Master I did a lot of cooking of various items packed in clay. There really is not much that you cannot cook in this way. It is especially great for baked potatoes.
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Old 05-28-2010, 09:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by headquarters View Post
I was wondering if anyone on the boards had tried to cookin a pit - a hole lined with stones that you fire with wood for a few hours ,and then place a parcel of meat etc in and cover with dirt to cook on the residual heat .

I hear some also place pots with lids secured inside and dig over with dirt .

Other ways of cooking outdoors or with archaic methods are also of interest.

Any information would be useful to me - I actually want to try it out for fun .
Look for a book called "Jack-knife Cookery" by James Austin Wilder, written by a "white kanaka" who grew up in Hawaii, was a Sea Scout, travelled the world on merchant ships, learned umpteen different ways to cook with little or no cookware--often just a knife, the food and whatever else nature had provided--leaves, sticks, seaweed, hot stones, tree bark, whatever.

My wife and I used several of the concepts cooking during various time periods of reenactments we've attended. Our favorite method was a "keyhole firepit". This is a rectangular shallow trench for the crossbar/spit, with an extension of the pit from one end where a cylindrical hole, just a bit larger than the diameter of our 6-quart cast iron 3-legged kettle. Make a good bed of coals while you're cooking on the spit or hanging pots from the bar, then scrape some coals into the hole, insert the covered kettle (filled with whatever you were going to cook), scrape some more coals on top, reinsert sod plug over the kettle. My wife made some killer potatoes (with onions and turmeric) overnight that were perfect for breakfast the next morning. You'll always find new "friends" on hand when your food starts perfuming the campsite.

We've cooked bread on sticks, baked potatoes in hot ashes, made apple cobbler out of dry stores and dehydrated apples. I've made impromptu cookpots out of coffee cans and heavy iron wire for bails. I love cooking over a campfire! It's a great way to teach kids about responsibility and economy--when you're hauling and cutting your own firewood that has to last for your entire stay, you learn not to waste it with huge conflagrations, and you learn that the fire gets taken care of before anyone goes off to play.
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Old 05-28-2010, 11:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by headquarters View Post
I was wondering if anyone on the boards had tried to cookin a pit - a hole lined with stones that you fire with wood for a few hours ,and then place a parcel of meat etc in and cover with dirt to cook on the residual heat.
Absolutely I have! I'm a New Zealander. The Maori people of New Zealand cook using a method known as the Hangi. Rather than try to describe how it is done I'll direct you to this site: http://www.wikihow.com/Put-Down-a-Hangi . It has a pretty good description of how it is done. Take it from me, food cooked this way tastes great!
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Old 05-29-2010, 01:42 PM
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Default great info !

thanks guys - I am going to try some of these out when we go up north in September for our "week of manly living outdoors and acting like we dont sit in front of computers for a living -week".

Cant wait to go .
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Old 05-29-2010, 06:00 PM
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You could check the various Bushcrafting web sites and web forums. Most of them have information about various forms of low tech/low equipment demand sorts of cooking.
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Old 05-30-2010, 04:15 PM
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thanks guys - I am going to try some of these out when we go up north in September for our "week of manly living outdoors and acting like we dont sit in front of computers for a living -week".

Cant wait to go .
Check out Wood Gasification Stoves. They are wood burning backpacking stoves. You can buy commercial ones like the Bush Buddy or make your own. I have the Bush Buddy and it is an absolutely fantastic little stove, and at 6 oz. in weight it is certainly something I can see a Twilight 2000 soldier carrying around in their pack.
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Old 05-31-2010, 01:37 AM
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Default Great kit

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Check out Wood Gasification Stoves. They are wood burning backpacking stoves. You can buy commercial ones like the Bush Buddy or make your own. I have the Bush Buddy and it is an absolutely fantastic little stove, and at 6 oz. in weight it is certainly something I can see a Twilight 2000 soldier carrying around in their pack.
Love the look and tech of this one - I have like 7 stoves already , but not one that runs on plain wood .

Come pay day I am going to get one I think .

I have also ben considering a " Kelly Kettle"

http://www.kellykettle.com/

But my budget is already blown on boots,ventile smocks etc etc ( bit of a gear head ).

Cheers for the god tip.
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