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Old 12-10-2018, 12:55 PM
tsofian tsofian is offline
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Default The shape of prime base

The the little base I proposed, and some of the others being talked about the recently I think a series of rings, with different functions in the rings will suffice. each ring is 1600 feet in diameter, as that is the turning radius of a Tunnel Boring Machine.

For some manned bases, particularly Prime Base this will lead to far too much separation. Even if a tram system is used having such distances between sides of a level can eat up a lot of time.

The towers in the original module are unworkable as designed. They are fixed to the living rock and would be placed under far too much stress to survive. I am beginning to wonder if towers are not the way to go though, or some other sort of vertical structures. Elevators are much easier to engineer and operate than trains or trams.
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Old 12-10-2018, 01:26 PM
dragoon500ly dragoon500ly is offline
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And therein is the problem.

But, perhaps, a combination of towers and tunnels might do the trick. If we use the tunnel boring machines to carve out two of these rings, to be used for stores of raw material/finished goods. Then connecting tunnels with bays that will contain the various labs and production facilities and storage vaults and connecting in a central chamber, housing the command center and it's supporting functions, the living, recreation and training facilities, etc.. Then it may be possible to build blocks housing these facilities. It would even possible set aside one of two of the connecting tunnels for additional living quarters, hospital and possibly a school.
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Old 12-10-2018, 04:32 PM
tsofian tsofian is offline
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I'm chewing on this. I do see towers and tunnels (are there trolls as well?)
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Old 12-10-2018, 04:57 PM
dragoon500ly dragoon500ly is offline
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Tried some sketches to see how it looked.

First problem is the number of personnel assigned. How many singles? Married? Will there be space for teams in transit? Dependents?

How many months of supplies will be needed? What type of production facilities?

Aviation support? Transport support? How about naval?

How many beds in the hospital? What scale of care? Medical labs? Morgue?

Space for a gym, classrooms, firing ranges?

Lots and lots of concerns!
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Old 12-10-2018, 06:38 PM
mmartin798 mmartin798 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tsofian View Post
The the little base I proposed, and some of the others being talked about the recently I think a series of rings, with different functions in the rings will suffice. each ring is 1600 feet in diameter, as that is the turning radius of a Tunnel Boring Machine.
I am just wondering where you got your 1600 foot turning radius. I have seem specs on Robbins TBMs and they can turn much tighter than that. One that I have read the report on has a 4.62m (15ft) boring diameter has a 105m (344') turning radius. A similar CTS TBM that has a 4.58m (15ft) tunnel diameter has a turning radius of 61m (200ft). Even if the turning radius grow faster than the diameter of the tunnel, I have a hard time envisioning the turning radius being 5 time greater when the tunnel diameter is just doubled.
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Old 12-10-2018, 07:48 PM
mmartin798 mmartin798 is offline
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I think I answered my own question. I found a patent application for improving the calculations for turning radius of TBMs. It seems it is dependent upon the desired tunneling speed, the cutting pressure, and the strength of the material being bored. So I guess 1600' tunnel diameter could be as correct as any other number.
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Old 12-11-2018, 06:37 AM
tsofian tsofian is offline
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I was looking at a 26 foot bore.
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Old 12-11-2018, 07:13 AM
dragoon500ly dragoon500ly is offline
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I was looking at a 26 foot bore.
For the regular use tunnels, workable. for a storage tunnel, and just thinking of the fun of maneuvering a 20-foot long cargo container in and out, you are more likely looking at a pair of tunnels drilled side-by-side for say a 50-foot diameter?
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Old 12-12-2018, 08:17 AM
tsofian tsofian is offline
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That would be a huge tunnel. Plus 26 feet wide would be plenty wide enough for moving tractor trailers and loads
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