RPG Forums

Go Back   RPG Forums > Role Playing Game Section > Twilight 2000 Forum

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 07-14-2009, 09:38 PM
RN7 RN7 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 1,257
Default Norway

Hi to all,

This is my first post on the Twilight 2000 Forum, although I'm not entirely new to the T2K game. I typed up "the few European Countries" orbats found on Bryn Monnery's website about five years ago.

I’ve been looking at Trooper’s list of Norwegian nuclear targets and have a few comments. According to Trooper’s Nordic Sourcebook Norway was targeted by seven nuclear strikes as well as receiving a few tactical nukes up north.

Norwegian Nuclear Targets
Oslo 1 Mt Political and industrial centre
Tromso 100 kt naval base. Town destroyed.
Drammen 100 kt ground burst Petroleum industry. Town destroyed
Harstad 100 kt naval base. Town destroyed.
Bergen 100 kt naval base and harbour
Stavanger 100 kt petroleum industry
Horten 100 kt naval base.
Northern Norway badly damaged from tactical nukes and conventional warfare.

Some points.

Norwegian Energy Production
Almost all of Norway's electricity generation comes from hydroelectric facilities. In 2004 hydropower accounted for 99 percent of total electricity generation. Norway's hydroelectric infrastructure consists of many small plants. The largest has an installed capacity of 1,240 megawatts (MW), or 4 percent of national installed capacity. Norway's reliance on hydropower leaves the country vulnerable to climatic fluctuations which require imports to meet seasonal shortages, but it also opens the possibility of exports during wetter conditions. Norway has the potential to increase hydro-generated power through refurbishing existing facilities, as well as constructing new hydropower plants. But most of Norway’s waterways have been developed and any new facilities would likely consist of small developments. Norway has also actively looked into conventional gas fired power plants and wind power to supplement its hydro electrical capacity.

Oil & Gas Reserves:
All of Norway’s oil and gas reserves are located offshore on the Norwegian Continental Shelf (NCS), which is divided into three sections: the North Sea, the Norwegian Sea and the Barents Sea. The bulk of Norway's oil production occurs in the North Sea, with smaller amounts in the Norwegian Sea. There is no current production and little exploration activity in the Barents Sea, although it is believed that the Barents Sea could contain sizable oil and gas reserves. As of 2005 there are about 60 oil and natural gas discoveries that are still undeveloped in the North Sea. Because Norway shares the North Sea region with the UK, both nations coordinate efforts when dealing with reserves that straddle the division of each countries' respective zone.

Norwegian oil & gas fields in North Sea
Albuskjell oilfield (decommissioned)
Asgard gasfield
Balder oilfield
Brage oil field,
Bream oilfield
Brisling oilfield
Cod oilfield (decommissioned)
Eldfisk oilfield
Ekofisk oilfield (Major)
Embla oilfield
Frigg gasfield (Major)
Grane oil & gas field (Major)
Gullfaks oilfield (Major)
Gyda oilfield
Heidrun oilfield (Major)
Heimdal gasfield
Hild gasfield
Hod oilfield
Murchison oilfield
Oseberg oil & gas field (Major)
Sleipner oil & gas field
Snorre oilfield
Statfjord oil & gasfield (Major)
Troll oil & gasfield (Major)
Tor oilfield
Ula oilfield
Valhall oilfield

Oil Pipelines & Refineries
There is an extensive network of subsea oil and gas pipelines linking Norwegian offshore platforms with onshore terminals. The vast majority of Norwegian oil is brought onshore through the Grane, Oseberg and Troll pipelines with terminals at Mongstad and Stura, while the remaining offshore production is brought ashore via shuttle tankers through the ports of Karsto, Tjeldbergodden and Kollsnes. In addition the Norpipe connects the Ekokisk oil field system to an oil terminal in Teesside England. Norway has oil refineries at Mongstad and Tjeldbergodden. Both refineries and the oil pipeline terminal at Mongstad were noticeable missed by Soviet nuclear strikes in Trooper’s Nordic sourcebook.

Therefore Norway is almost self sufficient in electricity production and most of Norway’s oil infrastructure has survived the nuclear attack. Although I’m under no doubt that Soviet forces tried to destroy or sabotage Norwegian oil production facilities in the aftermath of the nuclear strikes, the possibility exists that some or even most of it remains fully functional. We know that the British are covertly operating a few oil platforms in the North Sea even with much of their infrastructure destroyed. If Norway is largely self sufficient in electrical power and is operating its oil industry at 10-20% of pre-war levels, then there is a strong base for the establishment of military power in the region and for the long term economic recovery of Scandinavia and Northern Europe without French help.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 07-14-2009, 10:00 PM
kato13's Avatar
kato13 kato13 is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Chicago, Il USA
Posts: 3,355
Send a message via ICQ to kato13
Default

Hey welcome aboard and thanks for the input, some of that will be really useful for my maps.

For a long time I have been mulling the damage done to refineries by saboteurs, conventional explosives, accidents and general wear and tear. Given the powder keg that most refineries are, I think that a GM can say that anywhere from 15-75% of capacity could be taken out without nukes.

I have always thought that Spetsnaz units in the continental US (and throughout the Allied world) would have focused on ports, rail lines, and refineries.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 07-15-2009, 12:21 AM
General Pain's Avatar
General Pain General Pain is offline
...not exactly open casket material
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Tiger City
Posts: 1,953
Send a message via MSN to General Pain
Default Welcome

Welcome to the board.

I like the way you say "the Twilight 2000 forum".....like it's the only one...

It is the best IMHO.....

anyway good input..
__________________
The Big Book of War - Twilight 2000 Filedump Site
Guns don't kill people,apes with guns do.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 07-15-2009, 12:39 AM
Legbreaker's Avatar
Legbreaker Legbreaker is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Tasmania, Australia
Posts: 4,775
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by General Pain
I like the way you say "the Twilight 2000 forum".....like it's the only one...
There's others?

__________________
If it moves, shoot it, if not push it, if it still doesn't move, use explosives.

Nothing happens in isolation - it's called "the butterfly effect"

Mors ante pudorem
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 07-15-2009, 08:29 AM
Trooper's Avatar
Trooper Trooper is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Helsinki, Finland
Posts: 98
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by RN7
Norwegian Energy Production
Almost all of Norway's electricity generation comes from hydroelectric facilities. In 2004 hydropower accounted for 99 percent of total electricity generation. Norway's hydroelectric infrastructure consists of many small plants. The largest has an installed capacity of 1,240 megawatts (MW), or 4 percent of national installed capacity. Norway's reliance on hydropower leaves the country vulnerable to climatic fluctuations which require imports to meet seasonal shortages, but it also opens the possibility of exports during wetter conditions. Norway has the potential to increase hydro-generated power through refurbishing existing facilities, as well as constructing new hydropower plants. But most of Norway’s waterways have been developed and any new facilities would likely consist of small developments. Norway has also actively looked into conventional gas fired power plants and wind power to supplement its hydro electrical capacity.
The problem is that EMP has destroyed power transmission electronics. Yes there is still electricity in some parts of southern Norway, but industrial facilities have taken heavy damage in air raids. After all Norway has in war more than four years. Goverment has tried to rebuilt industrial capasity, but in 2001 "industry" is still in workshop system level. Norway can reload cartridges and manufactures mortar rounds & hand granades. And off course they have to make spare parts to vehicles and weapons. Rebuilding petroleum industry is not possible at current situation. The situation in Sweden, Finland and Denmark is similar. Yes there are several nuclear power plants but power transmission is a big problem.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RN7
Oil & Gas Reserves:
All of Norway’s oil and gas reserves are located offshore on the Norwegian Continental Shelf (NCS), which is divided into three sections: the North Sea, the Norwegian Sea and the Barents Sea. The bulk of Norway's oil production occurs in the North Sea, with smaller amounts in the Norwegian Sea. There is no current production and little exploration activity in the Barents Sea, although it is believed that the Barents Sea could contain sizable oil and gas reserves. As of 2005 there are about 60 oil and natural gas discoveries that are still undeveloped in the North Sea. Because Norway shares the North Sea region with the UK, both nations coordinate efforts when dealing with reserves that straddle the division of each countries' respective zone.

Norwegian oil & gas fields in North Sea
Albuskjell oilfield (decommissioned)
Asgard gasfield
Balder oilfield
Brage oil field,
Bream oilfield
Brisling oilfield
Cod oilfield (decommissioned)
Eldfisk oilfield
Ekofisk oilfield (Major)
Embla oilfield
Frigg gasfield (Major)
Grane oil & gas field (Major)
Gullfaks oilfield (Major)
Gyda oilfield
Heidrun oilfield (Major)
Heimdal gasfield
Hild gasfield
Hod oilfield
Murchison oilfield
Oseberg oil & gas field (Major)
Sleipner oil & gas field
Snorre oilfield
Statfjord oil & gasfield (Major)
Troll oil & gasfield (Major)
Tor oilfield
Ula oilfield
Valhall oilfield

Oil Pipelines & Refineries
There is an extensive network of subsea oil and gas pipelines linking Norwegian offshore platforms with onshore terminals. The vast majority of Norwegian oil is brought onshore through the Grane, Oseberg and Troll pipelines with terminals at Mongstad and Stura, while the remaining offshore production is brought ashore via shuttle tankers through the ports of Karsto, Tjeldbergodden and Kollsnes. In addition the Norpipe connects the Ekokisk oil field system to an oil terminal in Teesside England. Norway has oil refineries at Mongstad and Tjeldbergodden. Both refineries and the oil pipeline terminal at Mongstad were noticeable missed by Soviet nuclear strikes in Trooper’s Nordic sourcebook.

Therefore Norway is almost self sufficient in electricity production and most of Norway’s oil infrastructure has survived the nuclear attack. Although I’m under no doubt that Soviet forces tried to destroy or sabotage Norwegian oil production facilities in the aftermath of the nuclear strikes, the possibility exists that some or even most of it remains fully functional. We know that the British are covertly operating a few oil platforms in the North Sea even with much of their infrastructure destroyed. If Norway is largely self sufficient in electrical power and is operating its oil industry at 10-20% of pre-war levels, then there is a strong base for the establishment of military power in the region and for the long term economic recovery of Scandinavia and Northern Europe without French help.
Oil and gas platforms are quite good targets to anti-ship missiles. Yes you can protect those platforms but for four years? Norvegians are very lucky even if they have one drillship stored in some fjord. Even if they can produce only lubricants they are rich in post holocaust Europe. After all 75 % of population is dead and large parts of Norway are under soviet occupation. They need weapons from Sweden and grain from Denmark.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 07-15-2009, 12:46 PM
Rainbow Six's Avatar
Rainbow Six Rainbow Six is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Aberdeen, Scotland
Posts: 1,388
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trooper
After all 75 % of population is dead and large parts of Norway are under soviet occupation.
I thought canon had NATO forces pushing the Sovs out of Norway in 97?
__________________
A collection of articles written for the Twilight 2000 Role Playing Game

http://www.twilight2000files.com
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 07-15-2009, 02:06 PM
Trooper's Avatar
Trooper Trooper is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Helsinki, Finland
Posts: 98
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rainbow Six
I thought canon had NATO forces pushing the Sovs out of Norway in 97?
In 2001 soviets will take northern Norway and use the port of Narvik as base for operation Polar Bear. Even if NATO wins the battle of Narvik, norwegian army is so weak that the soviets will once again regroup their units and try take the southern Norway. (Yes THE final battle.) Scandinavia or western Siberia???

There is actually pretty decent material for Norway in the Boomer. Quick glancing even revealed one "extra" nuclear strike to Norwegian soil.

Ramsund ? kt Naval Base
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 07-17-2009, 09:58 PM
RN7 RN7 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 1,257
Default

Quote:
The problem is that EMP has destroyed power transmission electronics. Yes there is still electricity in some parts of southern Norway, but industrial facilities have taken heavy damage in air raids. After all Norway has in war more than four years. Goverment has tried to rebuilt industrial capasity, but in 2001 "industry" is still in workshop system level. Norway can reload cartridges and manufactures mortar rounds & hand granades. And off course they have to make spare parts to vehicles and weapons. Rebuilding petroleum industry is not possible at current situation. The situation in Sweden, Finland and Denmark is similar. Yes there are several nuclear power plants but power transmission is a big problem.

I’d still say that a fair part of the Norwegian power grid is operational or repairable in the south at least, after all by its nature Hydropower stations are generally well dispersed and located away from major population centres. Also if your entire power grid is hydro based there would be a lot of industry devoted to maintaining it, and plenty of parts available. A lot of the smaller southern cities and town in Norway seem to have survived, and with a relatively functional and renewable electricity supply the Norwegians would have a bit of a head start on the rest. Also the Norwegian oil industry and shipping industry is huge considering the relative small size of Norway. A lot of infrastructure must have survived and I think it is possible that Norway has some operational oil platforms in the North Sea. Sweden may also be relevant here, as it survived in better shape than most other countries and there must be a lot of industry still functioning.


Quote:
Oil and gas platforms are quite good targets to anti-ship missiles. Yes you can protect those platforms but for four years? Norvegians are very lucky even if they have one drillship stored in some fjord. Even if they can produce only lubricants they are rich in post holocaust Europe. After all 75 % of population is dead and large parts of Norway are under soviet occupation. They need weapons from Sweden and grain from Denmark.

I’d say Norwegian oil platforms were of secondary importance to the Soviets in the early part of the war given their location, and their location may also have been a factor in their survival. Remember this area is part of the GIUK Gap, which had the most intensive NATO ASW and anti-ship resources in existence. In the earlier part of the war I would say two USN Carrier Battle Groups were roaming these waters, in addition to other US naval and air defence assets stretching across the Atlantic from North America to Norway and Britain. There were also considerable British, German, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch and Canadian naval and air forces in the area which were pretty much tailored to hunt Soviet naval and bomber penetrations into this region. It probably was a slaughterhouse for Soviet naval and air forces in the earlier stages of the war. However this is not to say that oil platforms were not targeted or damaged in the general melee, but it is possible that many survived in functional or repairable condition. We know the British have reactivated a few oil platforms in the North Sea and we know that some British Marines are still in Norway, and I would say British forces are actively cooperating with the Norwegians in reopening as many as they can.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 07-18-2009, 12:13 AM
General Pain's Avatar
General Pain General Pain is offline
...not exactly open casket material
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Tiger City
Posts: 1,953
Send a message via MSN to General Pain
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by RN7 View Post
I’d still say that a fair part of the Norwegian power grid is operational or repairable in the south at least, after all by its nature Hydropower stations are generally well dispersed and located away from major population centres. Also if your entire power grid is hydro based there would be a lot of industry devoted to maintaining it, and plenty of parts available. A lot of the smaller southern cities and town in Norway seem to have survived, and with a relatively functional and renewable electricity supply the Norwegians would have a bit of a head start on the rest. Also the Norwegian oil industry and shipping industry is huge considering the relative small size of Norway. A lot of infrastructure must have survived and I think it is possible that Norway has some operational oil platforms in the North Sea. Sweden may also be relevant here, as it survived in better shape than most other countries and there must be a lot of industry still functioning.







I’d say Norwegian oil platforms were of secondary importance to the Soviets in the early part of the war given their location, and their location may also have been a factor in their survival. Remember this area is part of the GIUK Gap, which had the most intensive NATO ASW and anti-ship resources in existence. In the earlier part of the war I would say two USN Carrier Battle Groups were roaming these waters, in addition to other US naval and air defence assets stretching across the Atlantic from North America to Norway and Britain. There were also considerable British, German, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch and Canadian naval and air forces in the area which were pretty much tailored to hunt Soviet naval and bomber penetrations into this region. It probably was a slaughterhouse for Soviet naval and air forces in the earlier stages of the war. However this is not to say that oil platforms were not targeted or damaged in the general melee, but it is possible that many survived in functional or repairable condition. We know the British have reactivated a few oil platforms in the North Sea and we know that some British Marines are still in Norway, and I would say British forces are actively cooperating with the Norwegians in reopening as many as they can.


This may help

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of..._the_North_Sea
__________________
The Big Book of War - Twilight 2000 Filedump Site
Guns don't kill people,apes with guns do.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 07-18-2009, 08:21 AM
RN7 RN7 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 1,257
Default

Thanks for that list General although I did earlier give a list of Norwegian offshore oil & gas fields.

Most Norwegian oil platforms are in the North Sea/Norwegian Sea which is south of the GIUK naval line, and to an extent are sheilded by it. Considering the intensive NATO naval and air facilities and forces that are spread across the region oil platforms would be at best secondary targets for Soviet forces penetrating this area. NATO AEW, ASW, Anti-Ship and air defence resources would prove a formidable barrier for any sortie into the North/Norwegian Sea and UK Atlantic Margin, and hunting oil platforms may not have been a luxury that the Soviet forces could afford at any period of the war.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
europe, locations, norway, oil


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
OT - DJ-HOVA aka General Pain spinning discs General Pain Twilight 2000 Forum 14 06-29-2010 07:27 AM
FTF sessions in Norway General Pain Twilight 2000 Forum 26 04-15-2010 07:18 AM
Things to do in Norway weswood Twilight 2000 Forum 22 05-07-2009 02:24 AM
Norway in canon? Rainbow Six Twilight 2000 Forum 7 04-21-2009 04:24 PM
Norway in the Twilight War kato13 Twilight 2000 Forum 0 09-10-2008 04:07 AM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:58 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.